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New North American Rescue Plan for Endangered Porpoise

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreOfficials from Canada, the U.S. and Mexico have pledged to support a plan to save an endangered porpoise found in one area of Mexico but considered of concern to the entire continent. The vaquita marina species found in the upper Gulf of California is considered to be “critically endangered”. We are sorry. The content item you requested needs to be replaced since the sydicator has abruptly ended this news service. The Good News Network is committed to finding another version of this news story elsewhere and adding the replacement link by mid-January, 2009. Please check back!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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New Drug Could Offer First Treatment For Irreversible Huntington’s Disease

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA groundbreaking new drug is offering hope for Huntington’s disease: an inherited neurodegenerative disease that currently has no cure.While the average person’s DNA produces healthy huntingtin proteins that nourish brain development, Huntington’s disease is caused by a faulty gene that makes toxic proteins instead. These deadly proteins then poison the nervous system and cause loss of motor control, memory, and speech.While there are therapies that exist to help Huntington’s patient cope with the degenerative symptoms, patients typically die about 10 years after diagnosis.RELATED: Scientists Activate Stem Cells to Make Hair GrowIn a new study released by the University College London, however, 46 patients with Huntington’s Disease were enrolled in the first human trial for an experimental drug called IONIS-HTTRx.The drug, which was administered through the patients’ spinal fluid, was not only shown to be safe and well-tolerated, but it also successfully lowered the level of harmful huntingtin protein in the brain’s nervous system.Professor Tabrizi, Director of the UCL Huntington’s Disease Centre said: “The results of this trial are of ground-breaking importance for Huntington’s disease patients and families. For the first time, a drug has lowered the level of the toxic disease-causing protein in the nervous system, and the drug was safe and well-tolerated.MORE: Two Breakthrough Drugs to Treat Migraines May Soon Hit the Market“The key now is to move quickly to a larger trial to test whether the drug slows disease progression,” she added.Moving forward, the research team will conduct further testing on how drastically the drug can alter the progression of the disease. While they are not yet calling this drug a cure, they say that it is the most groundbreaking development in the disease’s treatment in over 50 years.Patients who have already received the drug will be able to continue taking it as a treatment for their disease in the coming years.Click To Share The Exciting Breakthrough With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Desi Oakley, Bryan Fenkart & More Will Star in the Waitress Tour

first_imgDesi Oakley & Bryan Fenkart Desi Oakley View Comments She’ll be pouring you a cup and saying, “Hello, how ya been?” Desi Oakley (Les Misérables, Evita) will star as Jenna in the national tour of Waitress. The touring production of the hit Broadway musical will launch at the Connor Palace—Playhouse Square in Cleveland on October 17, before making stops—and serving up pies—in cities all across the country.In addition to Oakley, the cast of the Waitress tour will feature Bryan Fenkart as Dr. Pomatter, Lenne Klingaman as Dawn, Nick Bailey as Earl and Ryan G. Dunkin as Cal. They’ll be joined by current Broadway cast members Charity Angél Dawson as Becky, Larry Marshall as Old Joe and Jeremy Morse as Ogie.The ensemble includes Skyler Adams, Law Terrell Dunford, Patrick Dunn, Jim Hogan, David Hughey, Arica Jackson, Kyra Kennedy, Emily Koch, Maiesha McQueen, Gerianne Perez and Grace Stockdale.Directed by Tony winner Diane Paulus and featuring a score by six-time Grammy nominee Sara Bareilles, the musical is based on the 2007 film by the late Adrienne Shelly, and follows Jenna, a waitress and expert pie maker, who dreams of a way out of her small town and loveless marriage. A baking contest in a nearby county and the town’s new doctor may offer her a chance at a fresh start, while her fellow waitresses offer their own recipes for happiness. But Jenna must summon the strength and courage to rebuild her own life. The musical’s score includes such popular songs as “Opening Up,” “What Baking Can Do,” “You Matter to Me” and “She Used to Be Mine.”Waitress made history as the first Broadway musical to feature an all-female creative team; in addition to Bareilles and Paulus, on board are book writer Jessie Nelson and choreographer Lorin Latarro. The Broadway production was nominated for four 2016 Tony Awards, including Best Musical and Best Original Score.To find out when Waitress is headed to your city, click here. Star Fileslast_img read more

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UVM Medical Center opens genome lab

first_imgThe University of Vermont Medical Center,Vermont Business Magazine The University of Vermont Medical Center has opened a Genomic Medicine laboratory to expand its use of advanced genetic testing that doctors can use to develop treatments tailored to individual patients. By pinpointing genetic variations related to a patient’s disease or disease risk, genomic testing leads to a more accurate diagnosis which may allow providers to choose a therapy targeted at the underlying cause of a specific patient’s illness.  Since early 2016, patients of the UVM Health Network with solid cancers – such as lung, colon and melanoma – have benefitted from genomic testing, which is only available at a limited number of academic medical centers in the U.S.  The new lab will allow testing of blood cancers, cardiovascular disease and neurological conditions, among other illnesses. Highlights:Genomic testing allows for “personalized medicine”.  Testing will expand from cancer to other conditions.Availability of genomic testing is limited nationally.“What was once thought of as lung cancer is now known to be many types of a disease that reacts differently to varying treatments,” said Debra Leonard, MD, PhD, chair of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the UVM Health Network and Robert Larner, MD College of Medicine. “With the precision treatments made possible by genome sequencing, some of our patients have had their tumors decrease in size.”“Genomic medicine provides the fundamental medical information we need to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment, which is critically important as we move to a health care model that emphasizes keeping people healthy,” said John Brumsted, MD, president and CEO of the UVM Health Network and CEO of the UVM Medical Center.  “This is a great advance for the UVM Health Network and the patients and families we serve.”“I want to congratulate Dr. Leonard and her team for successfully pursuing the goal of offering our patients leading-edge genomic testing,” said Eileen Whalen, MHA, RN, president and chief operating officer of the UVM Medical Center.  “It’s this kind of dedication to improving patient care that has made us one of the top academic medical centers in the nation.”“In addition to its expected benefits for patients, the establishment of this laboratory also provides an unparalleled opportunity for health care services research, including whether accessing genomic information leads to better outcomes for patients and more cost-effective care,” said Frederick Morin, MD, dean of the Larner College of Medicine. “The way we are bringing genome sequencing into clinical medicine should make UVM a model system for others to emulate.””Our sincerest thanks to everyone at the UVM Medical Center and UVM Medical Group who supported our vision to take this exciting step in the development of our Genomic Medicine program,” said Nikoletta Sidiropoulos, MD, the program’s medical director.  “Personalized therapy and prevention informed by genomics will become a significant part of medical care in the coming years, and we are determined that our patients will fully benefit from the promise of Genomic Medicine,” she added. The 5,000 square foot facility consolidates UVM Medical Center’s genomic testing into one clinical laboratory space specifically designed for this purpose.  The different steps of genomic testing will be performed across three separate specially designed rooms to meet regulatory requirements.About the University of Vermont Medical CenterThe University of Vermont Medical Center (link is external) is a 447 bed tertiary care regional referral center providing advanced care to approximately 1 million residents in Vermont and northern New York.  Together with our partners at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, we are Vermont’s academic medical center. The University of Vermont Medical Center also serves as a community hospital for approximately 150,000 residents in Chittenden and Grand Isle counties. The University of Vermont Medical Center is a member of The University of Vermont Health Network(link is external), a five-hospital system established to deliver high quality academic medicine to every community we serve.Source: UVMMC. 1.27.2017. For more information on Genomic Medicine at the UVM Medical Center, visit the website(link is external).For more information visit www.UVMHealth.org/MedCenter(link is external) or visit our Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and blog sites at www.UVMHealth.org/MedCenterSocialMedia(link is external)last_img read more

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UVM ranked #4 on Princeton Review’s list of top Green Colleges

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,UVM Sophomore environmental studies major Alysa Kelly, one of 20 EcoReps at the university, helps manage a Weigh the Waste event at a UVM dining hall. The idea? “We want students to realize that, even though they’re putting food in the compost bin, it’s still waste,” says fellow student EcoRep Lucy McGrew. (Photo: Brian Jenkins)Vermont Business Magazine The University of Vermont is ranked #4 in Princeton Review’s recently released Guide to 375 Green Colleges, 2017. The guide highlights the top colleges and universities among 2,000 schools the Princeton Review considered. UVM ranked first this year among institutions with larger populations. Five of the top ten colleges have 10,000 or more students.“UVM’s commitment to the environment, both in academics and in our sustainable practices, is a core part of the university’s identity and a key element of our appeal for current and prospective students,” said UVM president Tom Sullivan. “We’re pleased and proud that the Princeton Review has recognized UVM’s commitment by ranking us near the top of an elite list of the greenest schools in the country.”According to the more than 10,000 high school students and their parents who participated in the Princeton Review’s 2017 College Hopes & Worries Survey, 64 percent said that having information about a school’s commitment to the environment would influence their decision to apply to or attend the college.The Princeton Review ranks schools based on its “Green Rating” score, tallied from institutional data the publication obtained from school administrators and from surveys emailed to students at colleges across the country on issues such as how sustainability issues influenced their education and life on campus; administration and student support for environmental awareness and conservation efforts; the visibility and impact of student environmental groups; whether students have a quality of life on campus that is both healthy and sustainable; how well a school is preparing students for employment in an increasingly green economy; and how environmentally responsible a school’s policies are.UVM scored 98 of a possible 99 total points.This year’s high ranking in Princeton Review’s Green Colleges guide shows the effects of “a virtuous cycle,” says Gioia Thompson, director of UVM’s Office of Sustainability. “Students are attracted to UVM for the commitments they see to social justice and environmental responsibility,” she said. “Then they come to campus, get involved in this community and make their own commitments to living more sustainably. Some take on special projects and leadership roles, investing their time in helping the university itself make further progress. Faculty and staff working on sustainability topics often collaborate with students as they seek to understand problems, explain options and bring about change.”Earlier this year the University of Vermont received a STARS Gold rating(link is external) for its sustainability efforts from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. The university’s score of 70.87 placed it among the top 12 percent of all 770 institutions. Key to UVM’s success are its university-wide general education requirement for undergraduates; its strong policy record on climate action, diversity and equity; and its early adoption of best practices in planning and campus operations.Source: UVM 10.18.2017last_img read more

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GlobalFoundries Vermont wins environmental award

first_imgGlobalFoundries,Vermont Business Magazine National Pollution Prevention Roundtable board member Rick Reibstein traveled from Boston to Vermont this week and visited GLOBALFOUNDRIES to recognize the company for winning the 2017 Most Valuable Pollution Prevention ( MVP2 ) award. All GF employees receiving the award work at the GF Vermont facility. They included: Dan Wildermuth, Eric Lemire, Ruma Kohli, Jonathan Grohs, Randy Austin, Jim Densmore, Christopher Magg, Dan Hill, Louis Kindt and Shaun Crawford.GF’s winning project is “Elimination of Legacy Wet Chromium Etch Processing in Photomask Manufacturing” and is from the Mask House organization at the Essex Junction site. This project brought about significant savings and reductions and also resulted in improved operator safety and productivity.The following results were achieved:5,268 gallons of hazardous chemicals were eliminated from the manufacturing process, resulting in over $88,000 of chemical savings per year.  In addition, removing  the tools from the manufacturing process helped GF save 6.5M gallons of water; 352,414 kWH of electricity; and 6.5M gallons of waste; resulting in over $71,000 in annual savings.  This process change also resulted in improved operator safety and productivity (over 800 man-hours of operator time), increased process yields, and improved equipment and floor space utilization.Upon presenting the NPPR award to the team, Reibstein said, “It is gratifying to see at this facility, the good sense an environmentalist like me would want to see a business exhibit. It is the same intelligence and quality a smart manager, investor or customer would want to see. This company does not just make product it makes sense.”GF Mask House winning team: Dan Wildermuth, Christopher Magg, Louis Kidnt, Jim Densmore, Ruma Kohli, Shaun Crawford, Rick Reibstein (NPPR), Eric Lemire and Randy Austin. Photo courtesy GF.GLOBALFOUNDRIES is the world’s first full-service semiconductor foundry with a truly global footprint. Launched in March 2009, the company has quickly achieved scale as one of the largest foundries in the world, providing a unique combination of advanced technology and manufacturing to more than 250 customers. With operations in Singapore, Germany and the United States, GF is the only foundry that offers the flexibility and security of manufacturing centers spanning three continents. The company’s 300mm fabs and 200mm fabs provide the full range of process technologies from mainstream to the leading edge. This global manufacturing footprint is supported by major facilities for research, development and design enablement located near hubs of semiconductor activity in the United States, Europe and Asia. GF is owned by Mubadala Development Company. For more information, visit http://www.globalfoundries.com(link is external).  Source: GF 3.8.2018last_img read more

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Matija played Arsen in the crowded Dvor

first_imgProminent jazz pianist Matija Dedić performed the program last night, July 26, at the 67th Dubrovnik Summer Festival in the crowded atrium of the Rector’s Palace – Matija plays Arsena, as a musical hommage to his late father, top musician and class chansonnier Arsen Dedić.Jazz reading topics from The Glembays i In the registry, as well as Moderate Cantabile i House by the sea which have also been turned into exemplary examples of piano jazz and songs like Your tender years i Everything you know about me they found their place on the album as well as at the concert at the Palace. The album is actually much more than that homage Matija to his father, he represents the exclamation of the soul of one great artist to another, which especially touched the festival audience at a very emotional concert at the Rector’s Palace – in the same place where Arsen Dedić performed at the 65th Dubrovnik Summer Festival and performed some of these eternal compositions .Matija Dedić started playing the piano at the age of five. He graduated from the Jazz Academy in Graz in 1997 in the class of Professor Harald Neuwirth. Growing up in a family of artists, surrounded by pop but also classical musicians, at an early age he began to listen to different musical styles and soon began to write music for television and theater, and occasionally perform with famous Croatian musicians. He received an award for the album from the Croatian Society of Composers Octopussy in the category of the best young Croatian composer and author in the last 10 years.last_img read more

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Unloved Glasgow mall sells at 5.5% yield

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Crisis? what crisis?

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£340bn Government Property up for grabs

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Criminal justice system ‘institutionally sexist’

first_img The legal profession – Fawcett Society recommendations:Equal pay audits should be conducted by all top-tier law firms. Maternity leave or career breaks should not impact on career progression. Flexible working practices should be implemented and promoted among female and male employees.The Queen’s Counsel Appointments Selection Committee should work with the Judicial Appointments Commission to share best practice and methods for increasing the pool of women applicants.Equality and diversity training should be made compulsory for all barristers as part of their continuing professional development requirements. A mentoring policy, particularly for women who take maternity leave or career breaks, should be adopted by all barristers’ chambers and relevant employers.For more information see: www.fawcettsociety.org.uk Women suffer widespread discrimination at all levels of the criminal justice system, including in the legal profession and judiciary, according to a report launched at the Law Society today by equality campaigners the Fawcett Society. Following a five-year investigation by its Commission on Women and the Criminal Justice System, the charity has concluded that the criminal justice system is ‘institutionally sexist’. Its recommendations include allowing government lawyers to apply for the judiciary to help widen the pool of women applicants. The society also wants to see UK law firms increase their proportion of female partners by 50% by 2020. The society’s report, Engendering Justice – from policy to practice , identifies inequality for female victims, offenders and those who work within the criminal justice system, in the police, legal profession, judiciary, prison and probation service. It outlines a ‘vision for a gender-responsive criminal justice system’. The 110-page report said the lack of diversity in the judiciary ‘has remained a major concern’. It wants to see part-time working available at all levels. Within government legal departments, women make up a high proportion of senior lawyers because a greater emphasis is placed on flexibility, it points out. The society wants to see UK law firms, ‘particularly those in the top 10’, increase their proportion of female partners by 50% by 2020. The report said ‘the numbers of women markedly decrease in senior positions’ within the legal profession. Women make up 19.6% of partners in the top-100 firms. This is a slight increase on 2006, when 19% of partners were women. The report adds: ‘This percentage further decreases within the top-tier firms. In 2008, just over 14% of partners in the top four firms were female and 15.9% of partners in the UK’s 10 largest firms were women.’last_img read more

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New PC charges to benefit in-house lawyers

first_imgChanges to the practising certificate (PC) fee charging system will see around £16m transferred onto private practice solicitors, to the benefit of in-house and local government lawyers, under plans due to be unveiled by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Under the new charging regime, 40% of the PC costs will be paid through an individual PC fee, and 60% through a firm-based fee. This will mean less money is recouped from solicitors in the employed sector, as they will not pay the firm-based fee. This cost, which represents about 15% of total PC income, will instead be borne by lawyers in private practice. SRA consultant Alison Crawley said that lawyers in commerce and industry (C&I) and local government cost considerably less to regulate. She said: ‘The 40/60 split between the individual and firm-based fee means that 15% of the budget that is now covered by C&I and local government solicitors will be moved onto the private profession. If it’s not 40/60, we will have irate local government and in-house lawyers, who make up about 25% of the profession.’ The paper will propose that the firm-based fee is calculated according to gross turnover, with a banded approach similar to income tax. The SRA notes that there will be ‘winners and losers’ under the new rules. Sole practitioners with turnover below £30,000 will pay less, while sole practitioners who have large numbers of non-qualified staff and turnover of more than £1m will be ‘significant losers’. Richard Barnett, senior partner at volume conveyancing firm Barnetts, said the move to charge firms based on turnover could drive some firms to other regulators, potentially lowering income for the Law Society, and might be unfair on firms that had to pay out large amounts in referral fees. He said: ‘Is now the right time to do this, when alternative business structures are on the way and there might also be other regulators which might throw their hat into the ring?’ Former C&I Group chairwoman Carol Williams said the proposals were ‘excellent news’ for in-house lawyers. She said: ‘If you look at the risk to the profession of in-house solicitors, we are very low risk and very low maintenance, and that ought to be reflected.’ Law Society chief executive Des Hudson said: ‘I am confident the SRA will ensure that this consultation is as extensive and thorough as possible. These are potentially significant changes and that is why it is vital that the entire profession, from local authority solicitors, to sole practitioners and those in the commercial sector, engage with the SRA to give their views. We will be making representations to the SRA on the basis of our own consultation and examination of the proposals. A fairer fee policy for all was highlighted as a priority in the recent Hunt report of regulation of law firms. The SRA needs a full response to the consultation if it is to deliver on that.’last_img read more

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Government cannot afford to ignore £1.3bn in uncollected fines

first_imgAmid the last fortnight’s coverage of the government’s planned legal aid cuts, one potential alternative area of savings didn’t get any column inches: the millions of pounds that remain uncollected by the courts system every year. Some £1.33bn currently floats in this pool of outstanding fines, confiscation orders, compensation orders and legal costs, compared with £920m in 2005/06. Indeed, the matter either seems to have escaped justice minister Jonathan Djanogly, or at least, finding a way to open this treasure chest isn’t on the top of his to-do list. Take this interesting exchange in the House of Commons on Tuesday: Kris Hopkins (Con, Keighley) to Djanogly: ‘What recent progress [has] his department has made in recouping outstanding financial penalties that remain uncollected by HM Courts Service?’ Djanogly: ‘We have published impact assessments and equality impact assessments alongside the legal aid consultation, and these set out in detail what we think the effects of the proposals might be. ‘We must face up to tough choices, and our proposals focus resources on those who need help most for the most serious cases in which legal advice and representation are justified.’ Hopkins: ‘I think that was the wrong answer to my question. I hope the secretary of state has made progress in collecting the money that criminals have been fined, and may I ask that once we have collected some of the money and we have made a contribution to reducing the deficit, we increase our prison capacity?’ [Shouts heard in the chamber] Speaker: ‘Order. The minister delivered his answer with admirable force and self-confidence, but I think it suffered from being the wrong answer, as he was, perhaps, not expecting to be responding to this question. If he can provide us with the right answer to the question now, we will be very grateful.’ Djanogly: ‘I think the appropriate answer in the circumstances, Mr Speaker, is that we will look into this issue and get back to the house.’ When, and whether, Hopkins gets his answer, is a moot point. But regardless, the government has known for years that the pool of unpaid penalties has been getting deeper. The £1.3bn figure appeared in a National Audit Office report in July last year, accompanied by harsh criticism of financial management at the MoJ. The Magistrates’ Association said at the time that the failure to secure such a large amount of potential income, at a time of financial constraint, bordered on negligence. Figures in the billions often look better when written in full: £1,300,000,000. This is a lot of money. Even if only half can be recovered, it would go some way to plugging the gap left by the imminent legal aid cuts. And if the MoJ can really push HMCS to get better at recovering these debts, then there would be millions more flowing into the justice system – and potentially the legal aid budget – every year.last_img read more

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Getting to know you

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Friend or foe?

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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My favourites …

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more