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The Disco Biscuits Open Up New Year’s Run at Best Buy

first_imgLast night, The Disco Biscuits opened up their 5-night New Year’s run with the first of four shows at The Best Buy Theater, which will culminate with a fifth and final night at The Theater at Madison Garden.  From the first notes of an unfinished “Abraxas” into an early taste of an unfinished “Hot Air Balloon”, everyone in attendance could tell that this run was going to be started off properly.  It was like having all your family that you haven’t seen in awhile under the same roof again; people were getting down, with smiles from ear to ear.  A dyslexic “Digital Buddha” brought the crowd to a frenzied state as hands were raised high while singing along, before finishing the set with a “Triumph>Rock Candy”.Finishing “Digital Buddha” to begin the second set, the Biscuits jammed into a well received “Pilin’ It Higher”.  They tore through the second set with an unfinished “Portal to an Empty Head”, and finished the show on a high note with a delectable sandwich of “Robots>(inv)Crickets>Robots”.  At some point in the second set, if sounded as if a “Gamma Goblins” jam was thrown in there, but that is unconfirmed.  There was no encore, which left some in the crowd puzzled, but that may have been due to the fact that the second set went a bit over, and the band may have just kept on going instead of taking a break.Tickets to the remaining four shows are still available here, and if last night was any indication of what the rest of the run will bring, we recommend that you get on it, and quickly at that.Set List1. Abraxas (unf) > Hot Air Balloon (unf) > Gangster > Digital Buddha (dys), Triumph > Rock Candy (end)2. Digital Buddha (dys) > Pilin It High > Portal To An Empty Head (unf) > Pilin It High, Save The Robots (beg) > Crickets (inv end/beg/mid) > Save The Robots (mid/end)last_img read more

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Forest Policies in Rwanda, US and Gambia Win UN-backed Awards

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreRwanda won a United Nations-backed gold award for its forest promotion policies, an event that former US track and field star Carl Lewis, a nine-time Olympic gold winner, called more important than any athletic medals he garnered.Policies from the US and Gambia were runners-up, beating out entries from 20 countries to win joint silvers in the Future Policy Awards for forestry, announced this week by the World Future Council.Despite continuing population and land pressures, Rwanda has achieved a major reversal of its trend of declining forest cover and is on course to reach its goal of increasing forests to 30% of total land area.Forest cover has already increased by 37% since 1990. Massive reforestation and planting activities to promote indigenous species and involve the local population were undertaken, along with new agro-forestry and forest management education.“Exemplary policy solutions do exist. The Future Policy Award celebrates the best of them,” says Alexandra Wandel, Director of the World Future Council. “Rwanda has sought not only to make its forests a national priority, but has also used them as a platform to revolutionise its stances on women’s rights and creating a healthy environment,” says Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Honorary World Future member and Founder of the Green Belt Movement.Rwanda has also taken a lead in bio-diversity conservation, ecotourism and green jobs. The country of 11.4 million people has also been a pioneer in banning plastic bags: in 2008 a bill was introduced to prohibit the manufacture, import, use and sale of polythene bags in the country.The first Silver Award went to The Gambia’s Community Forest Policy, which has achieved sustainable forest management and poverty alleviation by handing control of forests to the communities that use them.“The success of the Gambia’s Community Forest Policy proves that even in the world’s poorest countries, with the right policies and legal framework in place, rural populations can benefit economically from forests and significantly improve their food security and environment,” said an official of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.The second Silver Award went to the US Lacey Act amendment of 2008 which prohibits all trade in wood and plant products that are knowingly illegally sourced from a US state or any foreign country.The World Future Council is a group of 50 respected leaders from all five continents representing governments, parliaments, the arts, civil society, science and business world.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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‘Dymphna’ explores themes of mental health and history

first_imgSenior FTT major Zoë Usowski will present the original theatrical production “Dymphna,” which tells the story of a 1930s mental ward nurse struggling with issues of morality, for the first time Friday evening in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center as part of her senior thesis.Usowski said she first proposed the idea behind “Dymphna” because she wanted to call attention to issues of mental health and its treatment throughout history.“I really wanted to highlight things I felt were missing in theater,” Usowski said.Usowski began working on “Dymphna” in February of last year while in a playwriting class taught by associate professor of Film, Television and Theatre Anne García-Romero, who later became her spring thesis advisor. Usowski said she found the playwriting process intense but rewarding.“We spent two months just talking about characters and what I wanted from them, and their voices and how they exist in the world,” Usowski said. “I think I wrote the entire first act in one day. I just sat in Starbucks and typed.”Usowski said she also made a deliberate choice to have “young, college-aged women at the forefront of the play,” feeling it important to create female characters who deal with issues other than romantic relationships.Senior Teagan Earley, the actress who plays the protagonist, said she appreciated the complexity of her character.“She is young, only 21, and new to the psych ward, and she wants so badly to make a difference in these people’s lives,” Earley said.Earley’s character also deals with personal issues outside the psych ward, struggling to establish herself as a successful nurse to avoid being forced to quit once she gets married.While the project is labeled a creative thesis, Usowski said the research component actually took up most of her time.“I wanted it to be grounded in realism, so that meant I needed to do research,” Usowski said. “I found handbooks in the library that were given to asylum workers in the early 1940s, and I read over those to see the language they used. They used terms like ‘moron’ that we no longer use in defining their patients. I had a whole stack of books in my room.”“The challenge in writing a play based on a particular time period is balancing research with writing,” García-Romero echoed.Usowski was in charge of all the writing, directing and design for the play. The cast and crew is small — the performance will feature five character actors and a sixth actor reading stage directions, she said. “Dymphna” will also feature visual elements inspired by Usowksi’s research.“At the performance, there will be boards featuring photos taken at asylums at the time,” Usowski said. “It’s really saddening to look at them — they’re really cramped situations, often alone.”Despite the play’s challenging subject, Earley said she found the process of acting and rehearsing enjoyable.“The cast and creatives were incredible to work with,” Earley said. “It’s so exciting knowing you get to be part of telling an important story for the first time.”Overall, Usowski said she hopes the project promotes awareness of mental health issues at Notre Dame.“Mental health care at ND can be pushed farther than its current iteration, so I just wanted to really humanize it — to make it present at the forefront of people’s minds,” Usowski said.García-Romero agreed with Usowski and she said she hopes Notre Dame students will attend the performance to learn about the issues Usowski hopes to highlight.“Mental health awareness is an issue that is crucial for our campus and our country,” García-Romero said.“Dymphna” will premiere Friday at 7:00 p.m. in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC). Tickets can be purchased either at the box office in DPAC or at performingarts.nd.eduTags: Department of Film Television and Theatre, Mental health, Playwrightlast_img read more

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Mark Evans, Ann Harada, Nikki M. James Set for I Married an Angel at Encores!

first_img View Comments Mark Evans Star Filescenter_img Casting is complete for the upcoming City Center Encores! staging of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart’s 1938 musical I Married an Angel. The previously announced production will run from March 20-24 at New York City Center.Newly announced cast members include Mark Evans (The Play That Goes Wrong) as Count Willy Palaffi, Ann Harada (Pacific Overtures) as Duchess of Holstein-Kuloff, Tony winner Nikki M. James (The Book of Mormon) as Countess Peggy Palaffi, Phillip Attmore (Hello, Dolly!) as Peter Mueller, Max Baker (1984) as General Lucash, Hayley Podschun (Something Rotten!) as Anna Murphy and Tom Robbins (Head Over Heels) as Harry Mischka Szigetti.They join the previously announced New York City Ballet principal dancer Sara Mearns as the Angel.The ensemble includes Rachel Coloff, Barton Cowperthwaite, Jōvan Dansberry, Alexa De Barr, Christine DiGiallonardo, Erica Dorfler, Kellie Drobnick, Julia Estrada, Ta’Nika Gibson, Stephen Hanna, Andrea Jones-Sojola, Naomi Kakuk, Francis Lawrence, Cory Linger, Robin Masella, Gia Mongell, Lindsey O’Neil, Michelle Mercedes Russell, Ryan Steele, Christian Tworzyanski and Kathy Voytko.With a book and score by Rodgers and Hart adapted from the play by Janos Vaszary, I Married an Angel centers on an angel (Mearns) who descends from heaven to save an unhappy and unscrupulous banker (Evans) from his sins. The Encores! production will be directed and choreographed by Tony nominee Joshua Bergasse.last_img read more

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IRONMAN UK gets altitude with Altium i10

first_imgImproving oxygen uptake is key to boost cardiovascular fitness. The Altium i10 device measures and reduces the oxygen concentration that the athlete breathes in. Over an initial period of 28 days, with an athlete using the device for one hour a day, every other day, the body adapts to improve oxygen flow to the muscles.Based in Glasgow and officially launched in September 2015, at the Cycle Show in Birmingham, UK, Altium i10 has been making waves across the endurance sport community in recent months. The Altium i10 is currently being used by keen amateur athletes competing at age-group level, along with elite cyclists, runners and triathletes aiming for the Olympic Games and the pinnacle of their chosen international sport.Brand ambassadors include: Rio qualifiers Callum & Derek Hawkins (marathon) and Hannah Miley (swimming); elite athletes Matty Hynes (running), Charline Joiner (cycling) & Grant Sheldon (triathlon); and amateur age group triathlon team the Hartree JETS.Altium i10 is billed as ‘the performance edge you have been searching for’… ‘It offers a way of physically stressing the body to simulate altitude without overloading the body; and it is a convenient and alternative method to deliver the endurance benefits of being at altitude.’www.altium-i10.comwww.ironmanuk.com Specialist altitude simulator brand Altium i10 has announced its partnership with the iconic IRONMAN UK event, which takes place in Bolton, North West England, on 17 July 2016.As part of its partnership with the event, Altium i10 will have a stand at the IRONMAN UK expo at the Macron Stadium in Bolton – and members of Team Altium will be on hand to explain the benefits of Altium i10 for long course triathlon racing.Katie Reid, Manager, Global Partnerships – UK at IRONMAN said, “It’s great to have the guys from Altium i10 at IRONMAN UK this year – explaining the benefits of their new altitude simulator device.“IRONMAN UK presents a tough, challenging course – and it’s interesting to see how Altium i10 can help athletes boost power on the bike, and then have enough in the tank to beat a personal best.”IRONMAN UK is the largest and most prestigious long course triathlon in the UK. Around 2,000 athletes face a gruelling bike course in the scenic Lancashire countryside before finishing with a run on the crowd-lined streets of historic Bolton. A crucial qualifier for the IRONMAN World Championships in Kona, Hawai’i, the event attracts leading pros, triathlon stars and celebrities from all around the world.Alan Montgomery, founder and director at Altium i10 said, “We’re really looking forward to chatting to the athletes at IRONMAN UK and talking through the benefits that our altitude simulator device delivers. We recognise that this face-to-face dialogue with athletes is so important, particularly for a new brand such as ours.“So, all athletes and visitors to the IRONMAN UK expo should pop by our stand, meet our expert team and fire away with any questions they have!”Montgomery explained Altium i10’s benefits: “By controlling and reducing the amount of oxygen athletes experience at high altitude, the Altium i10 device triggers the body to improve oxygen efficiency – and, in turn, boosts endurance.“In other words, it gives a boost to the ‘engine’ of the athlete; and we continue to see more and more individuals beating their best using our device.”Unlike altitude tents or other simulators that can be priced in the thousands, Altium i10 has an RRP of £499. This includes the device and cartridges for the main 28-day altitude simulation phase. Cartridges typically last two to three sessions and can be bought separately at £10 per unit. A free iPhone app works with the device to analyze and track progress. Relatedlast_img read more

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The Dangers of Talking to Your Car

first_imgInc.:Just because you can talk to your car doesn’t mean you should. Two new studies have found that voice-activated smartphones and dashboard infotainment systems may be making the distracted-driving problem worse instead of better.The systems let drivers do things like tune the radio, send a text message, or make a phone call while keeping their eyes on the road and their hands on the wheel, but many of these systems are so error-prone or complex that they require more concentration from drivers rather than less, according to studies released Tuesday by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety and the University of Utah.One study examined infotainment systems in some of the most common auto brands on the road: Chevrolet, Chrysler, Ford, Hyundai and Mercedes. The second study tested the Apple iPhone’s Siri voice system to navigate, send texts, make Facebook and Twitter posts, and use the calendar without handling or looking at the phone. Apple and Google are working with automakers to mesh smartphones with infotainment systems so that drivers can bring their apps, navigation and music files into their cars.Read the whole story: Inc. More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Active ingredient in magic mushrooms reduces anxiety and depression in cancer patients

first_imgShare on Facebook Share Share on Twitter Email A single dose of psilocybin, the major hallucinogenic component in magic mushrooms, induces long-lasting decreases in anxiety and depression in patients diagnosed with life-threatening cancer according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.Patients who receive a cancer diagnosis often develop debilitating symptoms of anxiety and depression. Reports from the 1960s and 1970s suggest that hallucinogenic drugs such as LSD may alleviate such symptoms in cancer patients, but the clinical value of hallucinogenic drugs for the treatment of mood disturbances in cancer patients remains unclear.In this new study, Roland Griffiths and colleagues from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine investigated the effects of psilocybin on symptoms of anxiety and depression in individuals diagnosed with life-threatening cancer.center_img LinkedIn Five weeks after receiving a dose of psilocybin sufficiently high to induce changes in perception and mystical-type experiences, patients reported significantly lower levels of anxiety and depression compared with patients that received a low dose of the drug. The positive effects on mood persisted in the patients at 6 month follow-up.The authors suggest that a single dose of psilocybin may be sufficient to produce enduring decreases in negative mood in patients with a life-threatening cancer. Pinterestlast_img read more

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Letter To The Editor: Fate Of Our Recyclables?

first_imgBy GRAHAM MARKLos AlamosWhat happens to the stuff that we put in our recycle bins? How much is actually recycled?Even if recycling is something of a sham (“It’s OK to be wasteful—Just recycle!”), it is broken in many parts of the US (Sierra Magazine July/August 2019).What is the state of our local recycling? Does all of our correctly sorted recyclable stuff really get recycled? What happens to the plastic shopping bags that Smith’s collects?Thank you.last_img

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Blood Needed For Possible COVID-19 Treatment

first_imgStony Brook Medicine, the umbrella company under which Stony Brook University hospitals and clinics operate, is asking for blood donations from survivors of COVID-19, as part of a federally-approved research project to see if blood plasma from survivors can be used to treat patients with serious or immediately life-threatening COVID-19 infections.Kali Chan, a spokesperson for Stony Brook Medicine, said in a press release April 9 that “researchers are collecting the convalescent serum to use in an experimental treatment strategy for those battling the disease.”Doctor Elliott Bennett-Guerrero is leading a study for Stony Brook Medicine that could save many. Independent/Courtesy Stony Brook Medicine“Plasma, the liquid portion of blood, which helps with clotting and supporting immunity, contains antibodies that can potentially be used to kill the virus,” she said.On April 2, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Stony Brook University Hospital’s application to offer the treatment to its patients through a randomized, controlled study and is expected to enroll up to 500 patients from the Long Island area.The study is being run by Dr. Elliott Bennett-Guerrero, medical director of perioperative quality and patient safety and professor and vice chair of clinical research and innovation for the Renaissance School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology.As in all studies, some patients will receive the potentially lifesaving serum, while others will receive plasma without the antibodies. This is done to ensure scientists can confirm the efficacy of using a new drug or serum being tested. Given the dire need for the novel coronavirus treatment now, however, instead of a random 50-50 distribution split between serum and placebo, 80 percent of the patients participating will be given the serum.“We are fast-tracking this large-scale clinical trial,” Dr. Bennett-Guerrero said, “as every second counts when seeking lifesaving treatment for these critically ill patients.”The use of serum rich with antibodies to help cure disease goes back over 100 years to the influenza pandemic of 1918, and was used most recently during the outbreak of Ebola in 2014.For the study to work, blood donations from survivors is vital.Those interested can go to www.stonybrookmedicine.edu/COVID_donateplasma. After filling out a survey, those potentially eligible will be asked to participate in a screening visit at a Stony Brook Medicine facility. The screening visit will take approximately 30 minutes, Chan said. “You do not need to be a Stony Brook University Hospital patient to participate, but you must meet required criteria for plasma donation and have high levels of antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19,” she said.Stony Brook Medicine is collaborating with Chembio Diagnostic Systems, a public company based on Long Island, to conduct testing.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Plug Power announces growth

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Ethane trade mission now in progress

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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New Gas and Condensate Discovery for Statoil

first_imgOperator Statoil and its PL146/PL333 partner Total E&P Norge have made a gas and condensate discovery in the Julius prospect in the King Lear area in the North Sea.The discovery well 2/4-23S, drilled by Maersk Gallant, proved gas and condensate in the Ula formation. Statoil estimates the volumes in Julius to be between 15 and 75 million barrels of recoverable oil equivalent.The well 2/4-23S aimed also to appraise the King Lear gas and condensate discovery made by the PL146/PL333 partnership in 2012.The well provided important information on reservoir distribution and reservoir communication in the King Lear discovery. The acquired data will now be further analysed.It is expected that the King Lear volumes will stay within the previously communicated range of 70-200 million barrels of recoverable oil equivalent.“The King Lear and Julius discoveries are located in one of the most mature parts of the Norwegian continental shelf – just 20 kilometres north of Ekofisk, the first commercial NCS discovery made 45 years ago. The discoveries confirm Statoil’s view that even such mature areas of the NCS still have an interesting exploration potential,” says May-Liss Hauknes, Statoil vice president for exploration in the North Sea.“Since the King Lear discovery, the main focus of the licence partnership has been to clarify the resource basis within PL146/PL333. Following the positive results of the Julius well, the partnership will start working on an optimal plan for a timely development of the discovered resources. The Julius discovery will be included in the resource base for a future PL146/PL333 development decision,” says Edward Prestholm, acting head of early phase field development on the NCS in Statoil.last_img read more

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ESS Orders New Carousel Design from Ardmore Craig

first_imgEcosse Subsea Systems (ESS) has awarded Ardmore Craig with a contract for the design of a carousel and associated spooling spread destined for cable storage activities.The order has been earmarked by a utility company for 40-year storage of a number of spare cable lengths.The carousel will be designed for capacities in excess of 1,500 tonnes and is the second upgradeable unit which Ardmore Craig has worked on with ESS.ESS Managing Director Mike Wilson said: “We have a long running and mutually beneficial working relationship with Ardmore Craig with its team supporting our project engineering and operational activities. This latest carousel contract demonstrates how companies within the supply chain can work together to offer leading blue chip businesses safe, simple and robust engineering solutions.”The latest award follows on from Ardmore Craig’s 150th contract and a busy summer supporting renewable projects around Europe.last_img read more

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In safe hands

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Footing the bill

first_imgWilliam Clark Partnership was employed to undertake QS and project management services for a developer called Dock Street in respect of a site which included a new build primary health care centre. Not only did the project run £730,000 over budget but William Clark and the developer had a serious falling out. Dock Street refused to pay the consultant’s final fee instalment, arguing that the service provided was inadequate and that its mistakes had contributed to the cost overrun. William Clark sued for its fees and the case ended up being heard in the Technology and Construction Court last year. For case report, see William Clark Partnership Ltd vs Dock St PCT Ltd in the TCC.One of the developer’s gripes was that the consultant had instructed unnecessary and costly variations which had pushed the scheme over budget. For example, the original plan had involved an external paved courtyard which was then changed part way through the project to introduce a “boulder and decorative stone design”. The developer identified seven such changes to the scope, costing in total an extra £215,000, which it argued were unnecessary and had provided no increased value or benefit for the development. It claimed the right to deduct the cost of all these items of work from the fees otherwise due to the consultant.The court judgment analysed, in turn, each of the seven variations and concluded that the consultant could not be blamed for some of them. In particular, some of the variations were only required because the original scope was inadequate, such that the changes implemented were unavoidable. However, the court found that some of the changes, including the external landscaping, were unnecessary and because the budget was tight, the consultant should not have instructed them. The developer remained liable for part of the consultant’s final fee but subject to a substantial reduction because of these “unnecessary” variations.The case is a timely reminder that consultants can be liable for the cost of the variations they instruct. In particular, attention needs to be paid to the appointment with the client and what it says about the consultant’s authority to instruct changes and obtain prior approval.The case is a timely reminder that consultants can be liable for the cost of the variations they instructMost construction contracts will give the consultant a very wide power, as the named contract administrator, to instruct any type of additional work, with practically no proviso or limitation. In this role the consultant acts as the commercial agent of the employer and has extensive powers to bind the employer to pay the contractor additional money for extra work. The variation mechanism under a construction contract operates such that the contractor can rely on the consultant’s instruction without having to worry about getting authorisation direct from the employer. The contractor will therefore always have a right to be paid for the instructed change even if the employer knows nothing about the variation.Precisely because the consultant has this largely unfettered power to bind the employer to pay for variations means it needs to be exercised with extreme caution.While the variation power under the construction contract will typically contain very few provisos, the consultant’s own appointment with the employer will often place very strict limits on its discretion to instruct changes. For example, the RICS Standard Form of Consultant’s Appointment, clause 11, states that the consultant may not change the scope unless it has the prior written approval of the employer. If the consultant fails to get such approval it will be in breach of contract, potentially making itself liable for the cost of the additional, unapproved, work.Consultants need to act with utmost caution because they will be in day-to-day email exchanges with the contractor concerning the ongoing project and the details of the scope. Any such email could amount to a variation instruction authorising a variation under the contract. After all, most construction contracts do not impose rigorous formal procedures for instructing change. Provided that the communication directing the change to the scope is “in writing” then a contract variation will have been instructed and the employer will be liable to pay the contractor.If the consultant’s appointment is anything like the RICS standard form then unless the employer has given prior written consent, the consultant could well end up on the hook for the cost.Michael Sergeant is a partner in the construction team at Holman Fenwick Willan and the co-author of Construction Contract Variationslast_img read more