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Taxpayer wins first Stamp Duty Land Tax scheme appeal

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Appelhof’s Intimate Portrait Of Lee Krasner

first_img On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof (left) who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee and Me: An Intimate Portrait of Lee Krasner.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison (right), director of the Pollock-Krasner House. Independent/Richard Lewin“Angry, outrageous, defiant, and courageous,” are some of the words author Ruth Appelhof uses to describe the American Abstract Expressionist artist Lee Krasner (1908-1984) — the subject of a memoir inspired by Appelhof’s 1974 summer stay with Krasner in East Hampton, “Lee and Me: An Intimate Portrait of Lee Krasner.”While perhaps best remembered by many as Jackson Pollock’s widow, she is regarded more by insiders as the producer of a major body of work that influenced the evolution of contemporary art — in particular, art made by women in the 20th and 21st centuries.Appelhof is widely known to the Hamptons community for her almost two decades spent as executive director of Guild Hall. Her long list of accomplishments there includes programming efforts that drew a record-breaking 50,000 visitors a year. She also initiated the much-needed Guild Hall renovation by Robert A.M. Stern, planning and successfully leading a $17-million fundraising effort. After stepping down in 2016, she began writing the book she vowed to write while still in college: “Lee and Me: An Intimate Portrait Of Lee Krasner.”“I was a 34-year-old graduate student doing research on Krasner when she invited me to stay at her house on Springs-Fireplace Road for the summer. I was getting my masters in art history at Syracuse University, and she had agreed to let me interview her. I drove my bright orange Ford Pinto to New York City to pick her up. She was horrified by my car, but she did not own a car herself. I realized right then and there that she wasn’t really interested in my interviewing her, she just needed a chauffeur. In fact, even her knowledge of how to get to the Hamptons seemed sketchy, at best.” Describing her Hamptons stay, Appelhof said, “At that time, Krasner was painting in the barn of Jackson Pollock’s old studio. I lived in a tiny bedroom upstairs in the house that’s now the Pollock-Krasner Museum. I’d interview her in the afternoon and type everything up at night. I’d bring down my notes in the morning and she’d take a Magic Marker and cross out all the good stuff. I thought I could get along with almost anybody, but Lee was difficult, to say the least. Re-listening to those tapes has been very difficult for me.”Appelhof said, “I struggled with decades of self-loathing, internalizing Krasner’s behavior and blaming myself.” But with the help of Helen Harrison of Pollock-Krasner House, the author located and reached out to many of Krasner’s other summer sitters. “When quite a few shared experiences similar to mine, I was able to let go of that pain,” she related.As a scholar and the friend to Krasner that she eventually became, Appelhof re-examines Krasner’s contributions in light of the intellectual and emotional experiences that Krasner so candidly shared with her in weeks of interviews. In her book, Appelhof explores Krasner’s relationships with others: friends, art-world luminaries, artists allowed into her private world. Those recollections offer a window into the artist’s intense and idiosyncratic personal life as well as into her contributions through the groundbreaking work she produced over the course of more than six decades.Appelhof notes that “for all her cruelty, she also had a large circle of deeply loyal and supportive friends and allies who helped her achieve her greatest goal: getting the recognition she deserved for her life’s work.”Among those, key was Barbara Rose, an art historian and critic who was pivotal in arranging a show for Krasner that began in Texas and concluded at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, where Krasner would be one of a very small group of female artists to have a show dedicated to her work. It was a stunning pinnacle to the artist’s career.But in keeping with a life filled with so many hurdles, challenges, and disappointments, Krasner died before the show ever reached New York.Hers was a life both glorious and tragic. The story Appelhof tells is riveting.karen@karenfredericks.com On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. Share On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. last_img read more

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Praxair to expand nitrogen capacity

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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World rail freight news round-up

first_imgSrbija Kargo has taken delivery of the first two of a total of 16 Siemens Vectron locomotives it has ordered in two batches, supported with financing from the European Bank for Reconstruction & Development.TasRail has awarded CRRC Qishuyan a contract to supply 1 067 mm gauge cement hopper wagons. The Chinese company has previously supplied the Australian operator with container and open wagons. Finland’s national railway VR Group is to establish a Russian subsidiary to handle timber traffic. It plans to begin timber imports from Russia to Finland for Metsä Group at the end of 2019, and to purchase 300 wagons in 2019-21.RZD Logistics and Belintertrans have begun weekly services transporting Geely car kits from Chengdu in China to the BelGee factory at Zhodino in Belarus via Mongolia and Russia in around 14 days. RZD Logistics is looking at the opportunities for similar services to Belarus from other Geely factories in China.last_img read more

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NOW TV to open an American Pie pop-up shop in London

first_imgTo celebrate the 20th anniversary of cult comedy American Pie, TV streaming service NOW TV is opening an all-American retro pop-up pie-shop. The shop will pay homage to the iconic ‘incident’ that became a world-wide sensation in the 1999 film.Open for one day only on Tuesday 30th July, fans of the film in London’s Soho will be able to relive the scene you might not want to watch with your parents – as every ‘warm apple pie’ served comes ready-made with a cheeky hole in the middle. Pies are free and come with a free NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass – which you can only get by visiting the store.Fill that sticky hole! 👇🥧 Come and eat a free pie to celebrate 20 years of #AmericanPie at our pop-up shop in Soho!Did we mention @JENCOOLIDGE will be there a.k.a Stifler’s Mum? 😍 #20yearsofpie More info at: https://t.co/FPTJlJ02MD pic.twitter.com/IpYiqzC9v4— NOW TV (@NOWTV) July 19, 2019Jennifer Coolidge, who starred as ‘Stifler’s Mom’ in the raunchy comedy series, will be opening the NOW TV Pie Shop doors and entertaining from behind the counter. The first lot of fans through the doors will get a chance to catch a snap with the film’s most recognisable star.WHERE: 48 Poland Street, Soho, London, W1F 7ND (Nearest Tube: Oxford Circus)WHEN: 12pm – 6pm Tuesday 30th July 2019COST: FREEEnjoy American Pie and over 1,000 movies on demand with a NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass.What’s more? To add to the celebrations, new customers can get a NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass for just £4.99 – the same price you would have paid for a cinema ticket in 1999. Available from Tuesday 30th July to Sunday 4th August 2019 via the NOW TV American Pie websiteWith a new premiere every day including the latest blockbusters and hundreds of classics, there is a movie for every occasion on NOW TV. Sign-up for a free trial of NOW TV!last_img read more

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Gov’t & DSC in talks to offer classes to inmates

first_img 113 Views   2 comments Sharing is caring! Share Share The Dominica government and the State College are currently in discussions for modules to be offered to inmates of the Dominica State Prison. This was revealed by Minister for Justice, Immigration and National Security, Rayburn Blackmoore during his presentation in Parliament on Wednesday 24 May 2017 regarding supplementary appropriation for the period ending July 2016 to April 2017.“We have started the process of negotiation with the state college so that we can develop modules in vocational skills so that the young men, having left the prison setting, would have gotten a skill to help them to make a contribution towards mainstream society,” Minister Blackmoore informed the House. He commended the management of the prison and the Ministry of Social Services for the accomplishment where inmates of the prison sat a Caribbean Examination Council’s examinations. On Tuesday 9 May 2017 fourteen inmates, whose age ranges from 18-25, were transported to the Dominica State College to sit the English exam. “Throughout my studies, every halfway house I went to in Canada or prison setting, every study will show that at least thirty percent of any prison population those persons are not hardcore criminals, so therefore we have to place more emphasis on correction and rehabilitation.”Moreover, Minister Blackmoore informed that money is being provided to the prison to enhance the security block “because prisoners have their rights too and in 2017 we have to ensure that the prison setting is at least humane”.Money is also being made available for a buffer zone on the compound, Blackmoore said.center_img EducationLocalNewsTertiary Gov’t & DSC in talks to offer classes to inmates by: Dominica Vibes News – May 25, 2017 Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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3 Open Minutes with Richard Fordyce

first_imgIn June, the USDA announced the enrollment period for the 2021 Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program will be held Oct. 12 – Dec. 11, 2020, through Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices. Progressive Dairy checked in with FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce to see if there were any changes to the enrollment process or program administration for next year.advertisementadvertisementRichard FordyceFarm Service Agency AdministratorUSDA – Farm Service AgencyAre there any changes to how the enrollment period will be administered?FORDYCE: We expect the 2021 DMC enrollment to be administered similarly to the 2019 and 2020 enrollments.During this enrollment period, can producers enroll in DMC through 2023, or is enrollment limited to 2021 participation?FORDYCE: Only new producers who began commercially marketing milk (started production in the prior 90 days) can lock in coverages until 2023. All other DMC participants will enroll annually, including those dairy operations with lock-in contracts.advertisementIf they can enroll for more than one year, are there any adjustments to premiums for producers who enroll through 2023?FORDYCE: Any new dairy operation (started production in the prior 90 days) enrolling in lock-in coverage will be eligible for the discounted premium rate.What do producers who enrolled (last year) through 2023 have to do this fall?FORDYCE: Producers will need to certify to commercially marketing milk, pay the $100 administrative fee and sign the DMC contract. The administrative fee can be waived for eligible limited resource, socially disadvantaged, veteran or beginning farmers.For any first-time enrollees, what do they need to know and do?FORDYCE: Those producers will need to establish a production history with FSA and, depending on when they started commercially marketing milk, some production information may be required. In some cases, the milk marketing statements for an applicable time period provide the production history information. However, if a dairy operation has an established production history, enrolling is simply a matter of contacting FSA to complete a DMC contract.advertisementWe don’t know about the potential of a second wave of COVID-19. Are there provisions considered to complete any or all paperwork online if FSA offices must continue to restrict face-to-face meetings?FORDYCE: The DMC enrollment process requires:Selection of a coverage level for Tier 1Possibly a selection for Tier 2 coverageSelection of coverage percentageFSA county office staff provide support for each of these steps. Through our current operating status, the agency has adopted electronic and online options for producers to be able to complete applications. Please contact your local office when sign-up begins this fall to learn about the best methods to complete the required steps.Any changes to how the program will be administered in 2021? For example, any changes to how production history is determined?FORDYCE: There are no changes to the administration of the program for 2021 enrollment.With COVID-19, school closures or unemployment, we’re hearing about next-generation or other family members coming back to the farm instead of attending school or pursuing other off-farm opportunities, potentially on a permanent basis. Any provisions for dairy operations that may have added a partner or brought a new family member into the operation and expanded?FORDYCE: Because changes to farm and ranch operations or business structure occur frequently for all FSA program areas, these are a normal farm record maintenance function for FSA county offices and should be easily addressed.Early 2020 was a difficult time economically. For producers who enrolled in DMC but exited dairying this year, are there any ramifications?FORDYCE: DMC operations dissolving during 2020 are responsible for the premium cost for the days they were commercially marketing milk.From a USDA standpoint, are there any learnings you’ve gleaned in the first year of the new DMC? Anything that will carry over into next year and beyond?FORDYCE: From a risk management perspective, 2020 has been a very volatile year for dairy and commodity markets, making the case for operations to have revenue protection plans in place.Looking at dairy producer stability, we can’t predict the future and other unforeseen so-called ‘black swan’ events such as COVID-19. However, as we reach a higher threshold of dairy producer participation in government-supported risk management programs, is that preferred to frequent ‘disaster assistance’ programs in terms of both concept and budget?FORDYCE: Farm bill programs like Dairy Margin Coverage are intended to provide long-term, reliable management assistance and support to America’s farmers and ranchers and our nation’s food supply.The fact that DMC and recent programs have targeted dairy producers expands FSA’s customer base, which will enable more efficient implementation of future ad hoc programs generated by times of dramatic natural or economic disruptions.In addition to the steps identified above (direct payments, government purchases), earlier this year there were calls for the reopening of DMC enrollment for 2020. However, Secretary Perdue (and others) expressed opposition to that, noting (paraphrasing) ‘that we had to let insurance work like insurance is supposed to work.’ Now, a month or two later, it seems like ‘insurance’ is working. Any thoughts or comments?FORDYCE: Long term, risk management through products like DMC will provide stability to the dairy industry just as they have to producers of other agricultural commodities. [The] USDA is committed to working with producers and other providers of risk management tools to improve these tools for the long term.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairyEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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Aeroflex Adds 26.5 GHz Capability to the 7700 Integrated Microwave Test System

first_imgAeroflex has introduced a 26.5 GHz high-frequency extension for the 7700 Integrated Microwave Test System. The 7700 frequency extension increases the frequency coverage of its test system from 6 GHz to 26.5 GHz, which will address the growing need for a compact, economical, high-frequency bench-top microwave test system. Its unique synthetic architecture and modular building-block design allows for a faster measurement throughput over conventional instrument-based systems while also providing improved flexibility and enhanced configuration options.The 7700 also comes with several standard built-in measurements, test executive software, and reporting tools to accelerate automated test development. The new product capability provides customers with a higher frequency range as well as the Aeroflex measurement quality. With the addition of the frequency extension, the 7700 has become a more powerful and complete bench-top test system available on the market today.last_img read more

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Compact SAW-Less Transmitter for 3G, 4G and 5G Systems

first_imgImec and Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) have demonstrated a 0.22mm sq. CMOS resistive charge-based direct launch digital transmitter with -159 dBc/Hz out-of-band noise. The achievement paves the way to small form-factor SAW-less transmitter implementations – which cab enable advanced wireless communication systems including all the cellular standards 3G, 4G and future 5G.Analog transmitters are less suitable for integration in advanced CMOS nodes. Digital transmitters are more compact and more robust to transistor imperfections and mismatches compared to analog transmitters, but they typically fall short with respect to high-end performance requirements such as out-of-band noise and spurious emission. Imec and VUB overcome this with a new transmitter architecture that combines the best of both worlds. The incremental-charge-based digital-to-analog (QDAC) conversion, allows full direct digital control of the transmitted signal, while at the same time enables intrinsic noise filtering that reduces out-of-band noise and alias components to state-of-the-art levels.The presented prototype features resistor-based QDACs that deliver the required RF power efficiently direct to the 50 ohm output load, omitting the need for a power-hungry PA driver. A peak output power of 3.5dBm and a phase noise of -159 dBc/Hz at 45 MHz offset from both 900 MHz and 2.4 GHz modulated carriers is achieved, with an Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) performance of -36dB for a 64-QAM modulated signal. With an active area of only 0.22 mm sq. this architecture is extremely suitable for integration in nanoscale RF CMOS SoCs.These breakthrough results were achieved in the framework of imec’s industrial affiliation program on reconfigurable radio technologies, including industrial partners such as HiSilicon, Panasonic, Murata, Sony and Cadence. The research also received funding through the Flemish HERCULES project VeRONICa.last_img read more

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New Line of Millimeter-Wave Removable End Launch Connectors from Pasternack

first_imgPasternack has released a new line of high-speed end launch connectors. These new removable end launch connectors are perfect for signal integrity measurements, coplanar waveguides, chip evaluations, SERDES, substrate characterization, 25 GbE and test fixture applications.Pasternack’s new series of high-speed end launch connectors is comprised of four models that provide a VSWR as low as 1.10:1 and a maximum operating frequency of 40 to 110 GHz. Connector options include 1.0mm end launch (110 GHz), 1.85mm end launch (67 GHz), 2.92mm end launch (40 GHz) and 2.4mm end launch (50 GHz). These high-performance end launch connectors don’t require soldering, are reusable and have a compact profile with a 0.350-inch mounting width. They feature an outer conductor made of stainless steel and a gold-plated beryllium copper center contact. These high-speed end launch connectors are ideally suited for high-speed digital and mmWave system development.Pasternack’s new high-speed end launch connectors are in stock and ready for immediate shipment with no minimum order quantity. For detailed information on these products, click here.last_img read more

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West Florida Men’s Tennis Falls in Season Opener to Top Ranked NAIA Team

first_img Share West Florida Men’s Tennis Falls in Season Opener to Top Ranked NAIA Team Feb. 16, 2008 MONTGOMERY, Ala. – Opening the spring season at Montgomery, Ala., the West Florida Men’s Tennis team (0-1) fell short against the NAIA’s top ranked Auburn-Montgomery (5-0) team on Friday afternoon. The Argonauts earned a single point in the 8-1 loss to the Senators. West Florida opened the spring season ranked fourth in the NCAA Division II poll; however the first ranked Senators were superior this time. In doubles play, the Argonauts earned a win, but couldn’t pull out any singles wins. Eduardo Cavasotti (Florianopolis, Brazil) and Luis Arboleda (Medellin, Colombia) defeated the top doubles team from Auburn-Montgomery, formed by Sanakai Papi and Plasa, 8-6. However, the Argonauts fell short in the other two doubles spots. In the second spot, the Argonauts came close to earning one more point, when the team formed by Nicolas Barrientos (Cali, Colombia) and Patrick Bateman (Apopka, Fla.) lost 8-6. In the third position Luiz Bernardi (Campinas, Brazil) and Jose Ycaza (Guayaquil, Equador) were not able to stop Auburn-Montgomery’s doubles team, falling 8-2. In singles play, the Senators were just a notch better than the Argonauts, earning every single point. In the first singles position, Luis Arboleda fell to the Senators top player 6-4, 6-1. In the second position, 23rd ranked in the NCAA Division II rankings, Eduardo Cavasotti had a close first set, but was not able to keep up in the second, falling 7-5, 6-1. In the third position, 17th ranked in the NCAA Division II rankings, Nicolas Barrientos started slow and couldn’t recover, losing 6-0, 6-4. Jose Ycaza played in the fourth position, and fell to the Senators fourth player 6-2, 6-0. Playing in the fifth position, Luiz Bernardi fell short with a 6-2, 7-6 loss. Making his debut with an Argonaut shirt, freshman Carlos Zamora was not able to earn his first victory in his first try, by losing his match 6-2, 6-3. The Argonauts returned to action on Saturday, 16th in Columbus, Ga., against Georgia College, to be played at 1 p.m. ET. The Argonauts will open at home on March 13th, and expect a strong season despite the opening season lost. #1 Victor Sanakai Papi (AUM) def. Luis Arboleda (UWF); 6-4, 6-1 #2 Daniel Plasa (AUM) def. Eduardo Cavasotti (UWF); 7-5, 6-1 #3 Alberto Gonzales (AUM) def. Nicolas Barrientos (UWF); 6-0, 6-4 #4 Michael Tucker (AUM) def. Jose Ycaza (UWF); 6-2, 6-0 #5 Francisco Redondo (AUM) def. Luiz Bernardi (UWF); 6-2, 7-6 #6 Tim Mudrick (AUM) def. Carlos Zamora (UWF); 6-2, 6-3 #1 Arboleda/Cavasotti (UWF) def. Sanakai Papi/Plasa (AUM); 8-6 #2 Redondo/Gonzales (AUM) def. Barrientos/Patrick Bateman (UWF); 8-6 #3 Nikola Miskovia/Tucker (AUM) def. Bernardi/Ycaza (UWF); 8-2 SinglesDoublesPrint Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Div. Forestry Asks Hunters To Be Cautious With Fires

first_imgThere’s been plenty of rain in recent weeks and days are growing shorter and cooler, but the Divisions says it will only take a few hot, dry days to create the perfect conditions for a potential wildfire. The Division also asks hunters to ensure spark arrestors on ATVs, chainsaws and other equipment are working properly before heading into the field. Govoni: “If you’re going to have a fire, like a campfire, keep your fire small, make sure you have your area cleaned out around it so it can’t catch into the grasses or spruce trees, monitor the fire at all times, have water and hand tools available. Then when you’re done, make sure it’s completely out and when we say completely out, to the point where you can stick your hand into what was there and it would be cool to the touch.” Dan Govoni in charge of Wildfire Prevention and Investigation with the state of Alaska Division of Forestry… FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享With hunting season underway, the Alaska Division of Forestry and Bureau of Land Management are asking hunters to be careful with anything that could cause a wildfire.last_img read more

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Good4U announce new partnership with Bristol Sport

first_imgBristol Sport’s commitment to the community through their various foundations and initiatives is matched by Good4U’s passion for making healthy living easy with an ever-expanding range of no-fuss superfood products that are tasty and nutritious snacking options.Good4U, an award-winning, family run business based in Sligo on Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way have products which are currently available in an impressive nine countries and are set to enter four new markets in 2019. They continue to be one of the North West of Ireland’s most successful food companies and thrive on the fact that they are providing employment in the area, supporting local businesses and getting ever closer to their vision of becoming the World’s most loved and trusted health food brand.Commentating on the new partnership Karol Butler, Co-Founder of Good4U said:“We are thrilled to announce our partnership with Bristol Sport. From the outset it was apparent that Bristol Sport were a great fit for our brand. Their all-encompassing ethos and inclusive approach is well-aligned with our mission to empower people to live healthier happier lives. Together we believe great things can be achieved”last_img read more

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Nashville judge throws out athletes’ ‘pay for play’ case

first_imgU.S. District Court Judge Kevin Sharp dismissed a lawsuit on Thursday that alleged college sports’ biggest conferences and broadcast partners exploited the images of 10 former athletes.U.S. District Court Judge Kevin Sharp dismissed a lawsuit on Thursday that alleged college sports’ biggest conferences and broadcast partners exploited the images of 10 former athletes.A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by 10 former college football and basketball players who alleged their images were improperly used without their permission by broadcast networks and eight NCAA conferences.Chief District Judge Kevin H. Sharp ruled in Nashville on Thursday that the players’ claims that they were entitled to monetary compensation because they played in televised games do not represent a sufficient case.The ruling is a win for the networks and conferences in a battle over the billions of dollars earned in college sports. It opposes a judge’s ruling in a similar California case and ensures publicity law — and payments — for college players will be tested in multiple appeals courts.Sharp dismissed the plaintiffs’ arguments that were based in publicity law, trademark statute and antitrust law, throwing out claims that television networks, NCAA conferences and their licensees were conspiring to exploit rules forbidding student-athletes from making money.The lawsuit, filed in October, named ESPN, CBS, NBC, ABC and Fox as defendants, as well as eight conferences, including the SEC.Former Vanderbilt, Tennessee players sue over use of imagesIn a memorandum of law attached to the dismissal, Sharp acknowledged that college basketball and football are “big business.”“Many believe that ‘amateur’ when applied to college athletes today is a misnomer — an artificial label and anathema, placed on players, like Plaintiffs, whose efforts on the court and field lead to untold riches for others, such as (the TV networks and conferences),” Sharp wrote. “Cogent arguments have been raised that it is time student-athletes share in the bounty, above and beyond any scholarships they may receive.”But, Sharp continued, the issue of player payment isn’t for the court to decide.Instead, it must determine whether sufficient evidence has been put forth to establish the plaintiffs are entitled to compensation for performing in televised games. Sharp ruled the group of former players failed to do so.Nine of the athletes who filed the suit have ties to Tennessee. The group includes three former Vanderbilt football players — Javon Marshall, Eric Samuels and Steven Clarke — as well as ex-Tennessee football players Rod Wilks, Byron Moore and Marlon Walls.“I agreed to be a plaintiff in this lawsuit because ESPN doesn’t own my image — I do,” Marshall, a native of Nashville, said in a press release at the time the suit was filed. “While TV networks and college sports leagues make billions of dollars off the images of college athletes like me, college athletes get no compensation. Nowhere else in America do the creators of a multibillion-dollar enterprise go unpaid for their effort.”Former Chattanooga football player Chaz Moore and former Tennessee State basketball player Patrick Miller were also plaintiffs in the suit, as was Nashville native and former University of Maryland Eastern Shore basketball player Chris Conner.All 10 of the plaintiffs participated in college sports between 2008 and 2013.A similar case heard in California is being contested before the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals after a judge last year issued an injunction to stop the NCAA from restricting players from licensing their names and images. In doing so, the judge ruled that players could be compensated beyond the value of their scholarships and said that money should be held in a trust payable when the player leaves school.That case, brought by players including former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon, made some of the same arguments as the Tennessee case. It was an initial ruling in favor of the players in an arena that few courts have considered.When it went before the federal appeals court in San Francisco for argument in March, the judges did not seem impressed by the NCAA’s contention that federal case law allows the NCAA to preserve its amateurism system without being subject to antitrust law.However, they did signal that they have questions about whether the players have shown they are being harmed by the NCAA’s refusal to allow athletes to be compensated for the use of their names, images and likenesses in live television broadcasts.Contributing: USA TODAYReach Stacey Barchenger at sbarchenger@tennessean.com and on Twitter @sbarchenger. Reach Matt Slovin at mslovin@tennessean.com and on Twitter @MattSlovin.last_img read more

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CCSD and JPD make a Monday morning house call

first_imgJELLICO, TN (WLAF) – At about 10 am this morning, the Campbell County Sheriff’s Office Special Weapons and Tactics Team along with Jellico Police executed a narcotics search warrant at the home of David Lee Williams at Jellico. (TOP PHOTO IS WILLIAMS HOME)According to the CCSO, narcotics investigators had previously made numerous buys of a schedule II controlled substance (oxycodone) at the home of the 48-year old Williams prior to the execution of the warrant.Williams is facing several charges including the sell and delivery of a schedule II controlled substance, drug paraphernalia, evidence to facilitate the sell of narcotics as well as the sell of a schedule II controlled substance in a school zone.  Williams case will likely be presented to the Campbell County Grand Jury.Since there were small children at Williams 812 Perkins Street home, a Department of Children Services referral was initiated. (WLAF NEWS PUBLISHED – 06/24/2019-2:30PM-PHOTOS COURTESY OF CCSO PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER JUSTIN LETNER)Share this:FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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Chelsea Under-18s see off Arsenal

first_img Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebook Striker Martell Taylor-Crossdale scored a hat-trick as Chelsea beat Arsenal 4-2 in the Under-18 Premier League.Harvey St Clair also scored for the Blues at their Cobham training ground, where two of Taylor-Crossdale’s goals were penalties.Taylor-Crossdale rounded the keeper to score after two minutes and then doubled the home side’s lead with a spot-kick after Jacob Maddox had been fouled in the box.AdChoices广告Jordi Osei-Tutu pulled a goal back for Arsenal and St Clair made it 3-1 early in the second half with a close-range finish after being set up by George McEachran.England Under-17 international Taylor Crossdale then scored from the penalty spot again – his eighth goal in just four appearances for Chelsea’s Under-18s.Josh Benson scored the second goal for Arsenal, who were unbeaten this season. See also:New Chelsea youngsters make winning start against FulhamChelsea youngsters beaten by Southampton despite fine goalChelsea youngsters thrash LiverpoolChelsea youngsters demolish Swansea, QPR thrash IpswichChelsea youngsters beaten by SwindonChelsea’s Kiwomya suffers injury playing for CreweReading comeback means Chelsea youngsters suffer first defeatlast_img read more