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Watch Queen, Adam Lambert, Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Perform “Fat Bottom Girls” [Pro-Shot]

first_imgOn Tuesday night, Queen and vocalist/frontman Adam Lambert offered up a performance at Dallas, TX’s American Airlines Center as part of their 2019 summer tour. The band was joined by the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders for a special rendition of “Fat Bottom Girls” towards the end of their one-set show.Queen and Lambert worked through a 29-song career-spanning setlist of fan-favorites including “Killer Queen”, “Another One Bites The Dust”, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love”, and “Under Pressure”. Following “Tie Your Mother Down”, the band rolled into “Fat Bottom Girls”, off of Queen’s 1978 Jazz album. Midway through the song, the local NFL cheerleaders emerged from behind the stage as they ran through a choreographed dance in-sync with “Fat Bottom Girls”. Guitarist Brian May stepped front and center and took a soaring solo surrounded by the cheerleaders. Queen and Lambert brought the set to a close with “Bohemian Rhapsody” before offering up a two-song encore of “We Will Rock You” and “We Are The Champions”.Watch pro-shot video of Queen and Adam Lambert’s performance of “Fat Bottom Girls” with the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders below:Queen + Adam Lambert ft. the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders – “Fat Bottom Girls”[Video: Queen Official]Setlist: Queen + Aadam Lambert | American Airlines Center | Dallas, TX | 7/23/2019Set: Now I’m Here, Seven Seas of Rhye, Keep Yourself Alive, Hammer to Fall, Killer Queen, Don’t Stop Me Now, In the Lap of the Gods… Revisited, Somebody to Love, The Show Must Go On, I’m in Love With My Car, Bicycle Race, Another One Bites the Dust, Machines (Or ‘Back to Humans’), I Want It All, Love of My Life, ’39, Doing All Right, Crazy Little Thing Called Love, Under Pressure, I Want to Break Free, You Take My Breath Away, Who Wants to Live Forever, Last Horizon, Guitar Solo (Largo from Dvorak’s New World Symphony (#9)), Tie Your Mother Down, Fat Bottomed Girls (with Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders), Radio Ga Ga, Bohemian RhapsodyEncore: We Will Rock You, We Are the Champions[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

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Gardeners Team Up to Grow 60,000 Pounds of Produce for New Mexico Food Pantries

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIn 2008 Leslie Davis suggested to her mother, a Master Gardener in New Mexico, that in addition to cultivating flowers for worthy causes, she might try growing fresh produce for the community, especially since the recent recession had left so many people unemployed and so many food pantries overburdened.That discussion five years ago grew like a seed into a thriving bounty of volunteers who harvest thousands of pounds of produce, sometimes in a singe weekend, for people in need.Led by Penny Davis and dozens of Sandoval County Master Gardeners, the happy band of do-gooders labor to feed their neighbors under the non-profit banner Seed2Need. (Watch a video at the bottom) 80 of them recently gave up their Saturday in the town of Corrales, near Albuquerque, to sit in the dirt planting the seedlings that would grow to fill two lush acres with tomatoes, green chiles, cucumbers, melons, green beans, carrots and zucchini. The project originally started with a small plot of land donated in the nieghbor’s horse corral but now the group works in a large irrigated field where boy scouts, families and retired folks together can plant and cover 2000 tomato plants in just over two hours. Two weeks later 3500 green chile plants were also dug in.“It was a demonstration of the power of teamwork,” said Penny, who last year saw their labor of love generate a whopping 65,200 pounds of fruit and vegetables, with an estimated market value of $82,000. All of it was was donated fresh off the vine to fifteen food assistance programs in Sandoval and Bernalillo Counties.“It’s so fresh that dirt is still clinging to the tomatoes,” says Leslie Davis who moved back to the state after leaving her old job. The social camaraderie and sense of helping others has sparked a passion in the younger Davis.She recounted with pride the story of a local man who owned an orchard. Last fall he offered 80 pristine trees to Seed2Need for the picking. A group of high school students had to go back three times to finish collecting the 11,000 pounds of flawless apples. Participating food pantries were overwhelmed with apples in the first week. There were so many that the central food bank of New Mexico was called in to distribute to other regional pantries.“Two to three hours and all of a sudden you have 4000 pounds,” Leslie Davis told the Good News Network. “They had to send a huge truck.”To keep down the costs and control quality the Master Gardeners grow their own seedlings in a greenhouse that, of course, was built and assembled by volunteers. With the tending of their skilled hands, the healthy organic plants thrive.“Little cub scouts are hidden by these bushes picking from tomato plants that are 5-and-a-half-feet tall,” recalls Leslie, who has noticed over the years of volunteering, the little boys growing up, too.Seed2Need also provides an easy drop point for residents and farmers in late summer looking to unload their excess harvest. Tons of produce were collected this way last year both at the Corrales farmers market and from individual donations.With the ongoing drought in the Southwest, the cost of produce is likely to climb, making projects like these crucial to those facing food insecurity.If you would like more information, or would like to help, please visit their website at www.Seed2Need.us or visit the Seed2Need Facebook page.Photo credits: Seed2NeedAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Legacy campaign raises funds

first_imgNotre Dame’s Class of 2013 will make a collective donation back to the University through the annual Senior Legacy Campaign. The Senior Legacy 2013 aims to give the class the “opportunity to bridge the gap between [their] experience as students and [their] plan to give back to the University after graduation,” according to the campaign’s website. Senior Mia Genereux, campaign co-chair, said student appreciation lies at the heart of the effort. “It is our way of showing gratitude for our time here, as well as stepping into our new role as Notre Dame alumni,” Genereux said. The campaign this year will donate its collections toward financial aid scholarships for University students, Genereux said. “Through establishing the Class of 2013 needs-based scholarship fund, we will be supporting future students for whom a Notre Dame education would otherwise be financially out of reach,” she said. Genereux said the senior class participation and amount of collected donations have been lower than usual, likely because students were only asked to make a one-time donation via a mass mailing system. Genereux said she hopes the implementation of a “three-year pledge” will engage greater participation from future alumni. “We want to improve senior class participation as well as young alumni participation rates through a revamped campaign, which includes a three-year pledge and a peer outreach system,” Genereux said. “Seniors can pledge to give back in the next three years at various levels of giving.” Senior Daniel Leicht, the other campaign co-chair, said he also believes this long-term plan will facilitate participation and donations. “We are confident that this pledge system will help seniors develop a long-term plan to give back to the University, keeping them engaged over a number of years rather than just the year that they graduate,” Leicht said. Additionally, the 2013 campaign hopes a peer invitation structure will help increase senior participation, Leicht said. “Each senior will be contacted by a fellow member of the class of 2013 to discuss the Senior Legacy and invite them to participate with a three-year pledge,” he said.   Genereux and Leicht said the goal is to have 75 percent of the senior class participate in the campaign this year. If they achieve at least 60 percent participation by the end of the school year, Leicht said the group will host a basketball tournament with “surprise celebrity emcees.” Leicht said he hopes interest and excitement for the scholarship fund will further encourage senior involvement. “[Through the scholarship fund], our class can provide the same opportunities to potential students that we have enjoyed in our time as students at this great University,” Leicht said. Contact Carolina Wilson at cwilso16@nd.edulast_img read more

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MEN’S BASKETBALL: Bearkats mark start of Cards’ homestand

first_img The Bearkats (11-8, 5-1 SLC) are officially in a three-way tie for second, just a half game back of Nicholls State for the overall lead. SHSU is currently two games up on Big Red in the league chase.Since dropping their Southland opener at Abilene Christian on Dec. 30, the Bearkats have rattled off five-straight wins. Sam Houston is coming off an impressive victory over Northwestern State on Wednesday in Huntsville, but road games have been a different story for the Bearkats this season.While the Bearkats have posted a near perfect record at home 2017-18, they have struggled away from Huntsville. The Bearkats enter the weekend matchup with a 2-5 (.286) road record. The Cardinals have been very strong at the Montagne Center, but have lost their past two contests and are 6-3 (.667) on the season.The Cardinals trail the all-time series to SHSU, 30-34 (.469), and have struggled in the series lately. The Cardinals have dropped nine of the past 10 meetings but are coming off a four-point overtime victory over SHSU last season in Beaumont. The Cardinals are 20-13 (.606) all-time in games played in Beaumont. Lamar sports informationBEAUMONT – Lamar will have another opportunity to climb a rung of Southland Conference ladder Saturday when it faces Sam Houston State.After putting an end to a three-game skid – which saw the Cardinals (11-8, 3-3 Southland) fall from the top of the league standings to the outside looking in (in terms of the SLC postseason tournament) – the Cardinals will look to take another step forward on Saturday.Big Red moved into a tie for eighth place in the league standings with its road victory at Incarnate Word on Wednesday. The victory not only put an end to a three-game slide, but was the team’s first over UIW in San Antonio in school history. Not the Cardinals turn their focus to a Sam Houston squad that is one of four teams tied atop the Southland standings with only one league loss. The Cardinals are averaging nearly 77 points per game from an offense that is led by three players in double figures, and four players averaging 9.7 points or better. Senior Colton Weisbrod ranks among the league leaders in scoring and rebounds for a second consecutive season and is coming off a 26-point, nine-rebound effort at UIW on Wednesday. As a team the Cards rank among the league leaders in scoring defense (68.26 ppg).SHSU is averaging 70.4 points per game led by Chris Galbreath’s 14.7 points per game. The Bearkats hang their hat on defense and lead the Southland surrendering less than 66 points per game to their opponents.Saturday’s contest will tip off at 4:30 p.m. from the Montagne Center. It can be heard live on Newstalk 560 KLVI and seen live on ESPN3.last_img read more

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Friday Roundup – Bicycle Bits and Pieces

first_imgRapha Cycle Club San Francisco is now open through July 31, and they’re hosting live screenings of the final days of the 2011 giro d’Italia this weekend starting at 6:30am Saturday. They’ve also got some great Gentleman’s and Ladies’ rides starting this weekend.Found: Google Books scans of Mountain Bike magazine from 2008 and earlier, and they’re searchable. Click here to see what was cool three or four years ago.London school children got to name four sections of the Olympic mountain bike course in Essex following a schools competition. The features on the three mile (5km) course in Hadleigh will be known as Rabbit Hole, Leap of Faith, Deanes Drop and The Breathtaker. Article here.Richard Schwin is lined up to present “Schwinn Paramount – Handmade Legend” at the Heartland Velo Show in Madison, WI, this August 27-28. Framebuilding teacher Doug Fattic will host a live brazing demonstration, too, showing dreamers and newbies alike how to build a bicycle.Think you’re a pro behind the lens? The Pinkbike Deep Summer Wildcard Search is giving you the chance to compete against five professional action sports photographers at this year’s Kokanee Crankworx in Whistler, BC. Based on a submission of three photos, one photographer will be chosen to compete.  Submit your photo entries here by midnight, June 3, 2011.Help a kid in need and add to your valuable BMX collection with the Mike Buff I Ride For Tyler Blick eBay Benefit Auctions. Tyler is the son of Steve Blick of Oakley, who is 5 years old and has been diagnosed withLeukemia. Old school BMXer Mike Buff is putting on the auctions starting today and all proceeds will go to help Tyler. Almost all the items are cool old BMX memorabilia that has been signed by guys like Mike Buff, Stu Thomson, Bob Osborn, Bob Haro, Jeff Kosmala, etc.The USA Pro Cycling Challenge is inviting sports and cycling fans to create the national and host city commemorative posters for the inaugural international cycling competition August 22-28.  Entrants can submit their artwork through the event’s Facebook page now until June 19, 2011.  The winners will be announced on July 19, 2011. Click on the Facebook page link for more information and contest rules.The second lucky pair of cyclists to be chosen for the Just Be. In Holland. 10-City Bike Tour are well underway on their 10-city tour of Holland. Follow their daily postings on the Holland and KLM FB pages to win daily prizes and a possible grand prize of tickets for 2 to Amsterdam and 3 nights at a hotel. We could all use a free vacation, right!?last_img read more

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Ben Platt Lends Vocal Power to ‘Older’ on The Late Late Show

first_img Ben Platt We’ve been spending the past week listening to Ben Platt’s debut album Sing to Me Instead. The tome of original songs performed by the Tony-winning original star of Dear Evan Hansen blend smooth vocals with moving instrumentals. Platt paid a visit to The Late Late Show with James Corden on April 2 to sample the new tune “Older,” sung with joy and urgency. Watch the star below and pick up your copy of Sing to Me Instead today. Ben Platt(Photo: Terence Patrick/CBS) Star Files View Commentslast_img read more

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Grinold: Economic development is about people and communities

first_imgby Adam Grinold, Executive Director, Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation I lead an organization that is working to build a vibrant regional economy. The dry language of economic development does little justice to the way our work touches real people and real communities. A sample of our activities from just the past few weeks illustrates the range of challenges and triumphs, and what our daily work entails:We brought 50 people together at our Southern Vermont housing summit.We helped a startup identify a location for their new facility.Our Southern Vermont Young Professionals partnered with BF3F (Bellows Falls 3rd Friday) on a February “Night Out” event.Our workforce team met with 100 employees impacted by a recent round of layoffs to create a rapid response plan.We made two micro entrepreneur loans, helping Hermit Thrush brewers keep growing and helping a new startup enterprise to launch here.We continued work with several firms to plan and implement expansion projects in Windham.150 college students met with our internship director at 5 different college career fairs to learn about local positions.We collected the last of 400 signatures to get on Town Meeting warnings (yes, January was a very cold time to do this!)Wilmington Works partnered with us to deliver a small business succession planning workshop.We completed installing teleconferencing equipment for 3 regional towns, creating virtual connections to one another and beyond.That’s typical. We produce great programs, and great results continuously…and it’s never enough.Our programs are all a means to an end, a way to reach a set of clear objectives to improve the regional economy. We are inventing best practices for innovative rural regional economic development every day, because we looked around for a manual but couldn’t find one. So a decade ago the BDCC & SeVEDS started writing our own.Southeastern Vermont Economic Development Strategies (SeVEDS) is an affiliate of the BDCC that grew from 2008 grassroots efforts, initiated by the BDCC, to reverse the region’s economic decline. In 2011 the SeVEDS Board was formed, and the BDCC established a Post Vermont Yankee Task Force which issued the Post-VY report(link is external). Based on those findings regional partners testified to the Vermont Legislature on VY’s economic impacts and the resources needed to mitigate closure losses. These lessons were incorporated into the creation of our region’s first strategic economic plan the 2014 Windham Region CEDS(link is external) (Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy) built over two years with 55 public meetings. The implementation of projects and programs is all about reaching a set of goals for healthy economic growth, which is why our CEDS received a 2016 award(link is external) for implementation from the International Economic Development Council.Since 2014 BDCC has invested over $600,000 of its own private sector resources and secured millions in additional funding to implement the SeVEDS strategic priorities. The reach of this small organization is as wide and deep as the relationships and partnerships we build. Our programs and projects are built on collaboration, our planning and capacity-building based on grassroots engagement. We stay focused by (a) sticking to our strategies, (b) being efficient and outcome-driven, (c) working hard to build buy-in and understanding, expecting the most, and knowing it’s never enough.And sometimes we need to take risks – remember there is no rural economic development guidebook! We innovate, which means operating on research, discernment and courage when we have to operate without precedent. We have also taken risks to find innovative ways to grow the economy  – whether getting into business “incubators” decades before startups were a hot topic when we acquired the Cotton mill (which has helped hundreds of businesses start and grow), or helping realign workforce efforts here so we can aggressively foster a new generation of students and working Vermonters. We go where our economy needs help and then find resources to do the work, rather than chasing trends.How do people get help from us? We field hundreds of calls and referrals each year from people new to the area, non-profits and towns, employers with a problem, individuals with an idea. If we don’t have a solution, we make a connection with someone who does. Our work has many names like INSTIG8, Fast Tracks, SOVT YP, SVEP, Startup Lab, CDBG-DR, NMT, but it adds up to outcomes that matter to real people and communities. We help people create new businesses, jobs and opportunities. We connect people with opportunity. We connect towns, non-profits and businesses with the resources they need to grow. We help great initiatives and organizations grow here. We help employers find and develop they talent they need to succeed. You can find more on our programs and impacts in our BDCC & SEVEDS Annual Report(link is external).Why do we do this work?It’s personal. This is where we live. All of our staff are committed to this region, many of us grew up here, half are under 40 and building their own lives here.It’s serious. In 2016 private sector wages dropped $50 million with the VY closure, companies struggling to hire as labor force shrinks, and a shrinking and aging population.It can change. That sounds bold but yes, we can make a difference if we are strategic, entrepreneurial, and work together. Before the VY closure our focus on job and wage growth was having discernible impact. We are on track to close that gap by replacing lost jobs and earnings by growing businesses and employment.We do it all to fulfill the BDCC & SeVEDS mission, to make Windham a thriving place with great opportunities, as well as great quality of life. Here’s what I can promise you; we will always look forward and take on the next challenge in order to build a vibrant regional economy. But to do this we need your support so we can continue to act boldly, act strategically, and act regionally.This is part 2 of 2-part series about the BDCC & SeVEDS regional approach to reversing economic decline, and overcoming losses related to the closure of Vermont Yankee.About BDCC and SeVEDS:The Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation is a private, nonprofit economic development organization that serves as a catalyst for industrial and commercial growth throughout Southeastern Vermont, including Windham County and the towns of Readsboro, Searsburg, and Weston. BDCC serves as the State of Vermont’s certified Regional Development Corporation (RDC) for the greater Windham County area. BDCC is one of 12 RDCs throughout Vermont.For more information visit: https://brattleborodevelopment.com/(link is external)Southeastern Vermont Economic Development Strategies (SeVEDS) is an affiliate of BDCC that grew from a 2008 grassroots effort, initiated by BDCC, to reverse the economic decline of the Windham Region and plan for the economic impacts from the closure of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. In 2014, after multiple years of regional input, education and data gathering, SeVEDS submitted the Windham Region’s federally recognized S.M.A.R.T. Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for federal approval.For more information visit: www.seveds.com(link is external)last_img read more

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US$100,000 IRONMAN Foundation humanitarian relief rebuilds homes in Florida

first_imgThe IRONMAN Foundation will provide a US$100,000 humanitarian relief effort grant to the city of Panama City Community Development in Florida. This will help solve the housing shortage created by Hurricane Michael.Specifically, the grant will help to fund new technology using 3D concrete robot printers that will build affordable and durable concrete homes. In addition to the grant funding, the IRONMAN Foundation, in partnership with FLO Cycling, will host a ‘Bike for a Kid’ pop-up service project in the IRONMAN Village at IRONMAN 70.3 Gulf Coast on Thursday, May 9 and Friday, May 10.IRONMAN 70.3 Gulf Coast athletes, along with their families and friends, are invited to visit the IRONMAN Foundation booth to assemble a bike for local kids in need. A total of 300 bikes will be built and distributed to children within the region in conjunction with IRONMAN 70.3 Gulf Coast on May 11 and IRONMAN Florida on November 2.“We are extremely grateful to the IRONMAN Foundation for their revolutionary efforts to solve Bay County’s housing shortage created by Hurricane Michael,” said President and CEO of Visit Panama City Beach Dan Rowe. “We look forward to welcoming IRONMAN back to our destination this year and thank all the athletes, friends and families who are committed to race to help rebuild.”When the Category 5 hurricane made landfall in October 2018, Hurricane Michael was one of the strongest storms to ever hit the Florida Panhandle. In the wake of its devastation, IRONMAN and local partners concluded that it would not be feasible to host the 20th edition of the IRONMAN Florida triathlon in its usual location of Panama City Beach, Florida, prompting the relocation to Haines City, the home of IRONMAN 70.3 Florida.The IRONMAN Foundation, along with support from HOKA ONE ONE, the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation and the IRONMAN community around the world, raised over US$200,000 in Humanitarian Relief to support the region’s needs, which will include a large-scale community rebuilding project on Sunday, November 3.“As we return to Panama City Beach and Bay County for the upcoming IRONMAN 70.3 Gulf Coast and November’s IRONMAN Florida, we are grateful for the opportunity to partner with Panama City to create cutting-edge, sustainable housing solutions and bring more families home,” said Sarah Hartmann, Executive Director for the IRONMAN Foundation.“We invite our community of IRONMAN athletes, their families and friends to join us to race and help rebuild the community.”“Bay County has a desperate need for safe and affordable housing as a result of the devastation caused by Hurricane Michael on October 10, 2018,” said Michael Johnson, Director of Community Development/CRA. “In the immediate aftermath of major disasters like Michael, the need for affordable housing to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people becomes more acute.“The innovative 3D smart homes we are planning need to be developed in well-designed communities to replace the housing shortages created by the recent storm. With the IRONMAN Foundation’s generous donation of US$100,000, we will be the first in the area to apply this type of new, innovative technology. Thank you IRONMAN Foundation!”The grant award was presented on Friday, May 10 at 11:30 local time at the Edgewater Convention Center in Panama City Beach, Florida.www.ironmanfoundation.org/reliefwww.ironmanfoundation.org/floridawww.ironman.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Taxpayer wins first Stamp Duty Land Tax scheme appeal

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Appelhof’s Intimate Portrait Of Lee Krasner

first_img On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof (left) who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee and Me: An Intimate Portrait of Lee Krasner.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison (right), director of the Pollock-Krasner House. Independent/Richard Lewin“Angry, outrageous, defiant, and courageous,” are some of the words author Ruth Appelhof uses to describe the American Abstract Expressionist artist Lee Krasner (1908-1984) — the subject of a memoir inspired by Appelhof’s 1974 summer stay with Krasner in East Hampton, “Lee and Me: An Intimate Portrait of Lee Krasner.”While perhaps best remembered by many as Jackson Pollock’s widow, she is regarded more by insiders as the producer of a major body of work that influenced the evolution of contemporary art — in particular, art made by women in the 20th and 21st centuries.Appelhof is widely known to the Hamptons community for her almost two decades spent as executive director of Guild Hall. Her long list of accomplishments there includes programming efforts that drew a record-breaking 50,000 visitors a year. She also initiated the much-needed Guild Hall renovation by Robert A.M. Stern, planning and successfully leading a $17-million fundraising effort. After stepping down in 2016, she began writing the book she vowed to write while still in college: “Lee and Me: An Intimate Portrait Of Lee Krasner.”“I was a 34-year-old graduate student doing research on Krasner when she invited me to stay at her house on Springs-Fireplace Road for the summer. I was getting my masters in art history at Syracuse University, and she had agreed to let me interview her. I drove my bright orange Ford Pinto to New York City to pick her up. She was horrified by my car, but she did not own a car herself. I realized right then and there that she wasn’t really interested in my interviewing her, she just needed a chauffeur. In fact, even her knowledge of how to get to the Hamptons seemed sketchy, at best.” Describing her Hamptons stay, Appelhof said, “At that time, Krasner was painting in the barn of Jackson Pollock’s old studio. I lived in a tiny bedroom upstairs in the house that’s now the Pollock-Krasner Museum. I’d interview her in the afternoon and type everything up at night. I’d bring down my notes in the morning and she’d take a Magic Marker and cross out all the good stuff. I thought I could get along with almost anybody, but Lee was difficult, to say the least. Re-listening to those tapes has been very difficult for me.”Appelhof said, “I struggled with decades of self-loathing, internalizing Krasner’s behavior and blaming myself.” But with the help of Helen Harrison of Pollock-Krasner House, the author located and reached out to many of Krasner’s other summer sitters. “When quite a few shared experiences similar to mine, I was able to let go of that pain,” she related.As a scholar and the friend to Krasner that she eventually became, Appelhof re-examines Krasner’s contributions in light of the intellectual and emotional experiences that Krasner so candidly shared with her in weeks of interviews. In her book, Appelhof explores Krasner’s relationships with others: friends, art-world luminaries, artists allowed into her private world. Those recollections offer a window into the artist’s intense and idiosyncratic personal life as well as into her contributions through the groundbreaking work she produced over the course of more than six decades.Appelhof notes that “for all her cruelty, she also had a large circle of deeply loyal and supportive friends and allies who helped her achieve her greatest goal: getting the recognition she deserved for her life’s work.”Among those, key was Barbara Rose, an art historian and critic who was pivotal in arranging a show for Krasner that began in Texas and concluded at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, where Krasner would be one of a very small group of female artists to have a show dedicated to her work. It was a stunning pinnacle to the artist’s career.But in keeping with a life filled with so many hurdles, challenges, and disappointments, Krasner died before the show ever reached New York.Hers was a life both glorious and tragic. The story Appelhof tells is riveting.karen@karenfredericks.com On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. Share On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. On Monday, March 9, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society of East Hampton hosted Ruth Appelhof who discussed aspects of her upcoming book “Lee & Me.” She was interviewed by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House. last_img read more

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Praxair to expand nitrogen capacity

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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World rail freight news round-up

first_imgSrbija Kargo has taken delivery of the first two of a total of 16 Siemens Vectron locomotives it has ordered in two batches, supported with financing from the European Bank for Reconstruction & Development.TasRail has awarded CRRC Qishuyan a contract to supply 1 067 mm gauge cement hopper wagons. The Chinese company has previously supplied the Australian operator with container and open wagons. Finland’s national railway VR Group is to establish a Russian subsidiary to handle timber traffic. It plans to begin timber imports from Russia to Finland for Metsä Group at the end of 2019, and to purchase 300 wagons in 2019-21.RZD Logistics and Belintertrans have begun weekly services transporting Geely car kits from Chengdu in China to the BelGee factory at Zhodino in Belarus via Mongolia and Russia in around 14 days. RZD Logistics is looking at the opportunities for similar services to Belarus from other Geely factories in China.last_img read more

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NOW TV to open an American Pie pop-up shop in London

first_imgTo celebrate the 20th anniversary of cult comedy American Pie, TV streaming service NOW TV is opening an all-American retro pop-up pie-shop. The shop will pay homage to the iconic ‘incident’ that became a world-wide sensation in the 1999 film.Open for one day only on Tuesday 30th July, fans of the film in London’s Soho will be able to relive the scene you might not want to watch with your parents – as every ‘warm apple pie’ served comes ready-made with a cheeky hole in the middle. Pies are free and come with a free NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass – which you can only get by visiting the store.Fill that sticky hole! 👇🥧 Come and eat a free pie to celebrate 20 years of #AmericanPie at our pop-up shop in Soho!Did we mention @JENCOOLIDGE will be there a.k.a Stifler’s Mum? 😍 #20yearsofpie More info at: https://t.co/FPTJlJ02MD pic.twitter.com/IpYiqzC9v4— NOW TV (@NOWTV) July 19, 2019Jennifer Coolidge, who starred as ‘Stifler’s Mom’ in the raunchy comedy series, will be opening the NOW TV Pie Shop doors and entertaining from behind the counter. The first lot of fans through the doors will get a chance to catch a snap with the film’s most recognisable star.WHERE: 48 Poland Street, Soho, London, W1F 7ND (Nearest Tube: Oxford Circus)WHEN: 12pm – 6pm Tuesday 30th July 2019COST: FREEEnjoy American Pie and over 1,000 movies on demand with a NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass.What’s more? To add to the celebrations, new customers can get a NOW TV Sky Cinema Pass for just £4.99 – the same price you would have paid for a cinema ticket in 1999. Available from Tuesday 30th July to Sunday 4th August 2019 via the NOW TV American Pie websiteWith a new premiere every day including the latest blockbusters and hundreds of classics, there is a movie for every occasion on NOW TV. Sign-up for a free trial of NOW TV!last_img read more

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Gov’t & DSC in talks to offer classes to inmates

first_img 113 Views   2 comments Sharing is caring! Share Share The Dominica government and the State College are currently in discussions for modules to be offered to inmates of the Dominica State Prison. This was revealed by Minister for Justice, Immigration and National Security, Rayburn Blackmoore during his presentation in Parliament on Wednesday 24 May 2017 regarding supplementary appropriation for the period ending July 2016 to April 2017.“We have started the process of negotiation with the state college so that we can develop modules in vocational skills so that the young men, having left the prison setting, would have gotten a skill to help them to make a contribution towards mainstream society,” Minister Blackmoore informed the House. He commended the management of the prison and the Ministry of Social Services for the accomplishment where inmates of the prison sat a Caribbean Examination Council’s examinations. On Tuesday 9 May 2017 fourteen inmates, whose age ranges from 18-25, were transported to the Dominica State College to sit the English exam. “Throughout my studies, every halfway house I went to in Canada or prison setting, every study will show that at least thirty percent of any prison population those persons are not hardcore criminals, so therefore we have to place more emphasis on correction and rehabilitation.”Moreover, Minister Blackmoore informed that money is being provided to the prison to enhance the security block “because prisoners have their rights too and in 2017 we have to ensure that the prison setting is at least humane”.Money is also being made available for a buffer zone on the compound, Blackmoore said.center_img EducationLocalNewsTertiary Gov’t & DSC in talks to offer classes to inmates by: Dominica Vibes News – May 25, 2017 Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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3 Open Minutes with Richard Fordyce

first_imgIn June, the USDA announced the enrollment period for the 2021 Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program will be held Oct. 12 – Dec. 11, 2020, through Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices. Progressive Dairy checked in with FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce to see if there were any changes to the enrollment process or program administration for next year.advertisementadvertisementRichard FordyceFarm Service Agency AdministratorUSDA – Farm Service AgencyAre there any changes to how the enrollment period will be administered?FORDYCE: We expect the 2021 DMC enrollment to be administered similarly to the 2019 and 2020 enrollments.During this enrollment period, can producers enroll in DMC through 2023, or is enrollment limited to 2021 participation?FORDYCE: Only new producers who began commercially marketing milk (started production in the prior 90 days) can lock in coverages until 2023. All other DMC participants will enroll annually, including those dairy operations with lock-in contracts.advertisementIf they can enroll for more than one year, are there any adjustments to premiums for producers who enroll through 2023?FORDYCE: Any new dairy operation (started production in the prior 90 days) enrolling in lock-in coverage will be eligible for the discounted premium rate.What do producers who enrolled (last year) through 2023 have to do this fall?FORDYCE: Producers will need to certify to commercially marketing milk, pay the $100 administrative fee and sign the DMC contract. The administrative fee can be waived for eligible limited resource, socially disadvantaged, veteran or beginning farmers.For any first-time enrollees, what do they need to know and do?FORDYCE: Those producers will need to establish a production history with FSA and, depending on when they started commercially marketing milk, some production information may be required. In some cases, the milk marketing statements for an applicable time period provide the production history information. However, if a dairy operation has an established production history, enrolling is simply a matter of contacting FSA to complete a DMC contract.advertisementWe don’t know about the potential of a second wave of COVID-19. Are there provisions considered to complete any or all paperwork online if FSA offices must continue to restrict face-to-face meetings?FORDYCE: The DMC enrollment process requires:Selection of a coverage level for Tier 1Possibly a selection for Tier 2 coverageSelection of coverage percentageFSA county office staff provide support for each of these steps. Through our current operating status, the agency has adopted electronic and online options for producers to be able to complete applications. Please contact your local office when sign-up begins this fall to learn about the best methods to complete the required steps.Any changes to how the program will be administered in 2021? For example, any changes to how production history is determined?FORDYCE: There are no changes to the administration of the program for 2021 enrollment.With COVID-19, school closures or unemployment, we’re hearing about next-generation or other family members coming back to the farm instead of attending school or pursuing other off-farm opportunities, potentially on a permanent basis. Any provisions for dairy operations that may have added a partner or brought a new family member into the operation and expanded?FORDYCE: Because changes to farm and ranch operations or business structure occur frequently for all FSA program areas, these are a normal farm record maintenance function for FSA county offices and should be easily addressed.Early 2020 was a difficult time economically. For producers who enrolled in DMC but exited dairying this year, are there any ramifications?FORDYCE: DMC operations dissolving during 2020 are responsible for the premium cost for the days they were commercially marketing milk.From a USDA standpoint, are there any learnings you’ve gleaned in the first year of the new DMC? Anything that will carry over into next year and beyond?FORDYCE: From a risk management perspective, 2020 has been a very volatile year for dairy and commodity markets, making the case for operations to have revenue protection plans in place.Looking at dairy producer stability, we can’t predict the future and other unforeseen so-called ‘black swan’ events such as COVID-19. However, as we reach a higher threshold of dairy producer participation in government-supported risk management programs, is that preferred to frequent ‘disaster assistance’ programs in terms of both concept and budget?FORDYCE: Farm bill programs like Dairy Margin Coverage are intended to provide long-term, reliable management assistance and support to America’s farmers and ranchers and our nation’s food supply.The fact that DMC and recent programs have targeted dairy producers expands FSA’s customer base, which will enable more efficient implementation of future ad hoc programs generated by times of dramatic natural or economic disruptions.In addition to the steps identified above (direct payments, government purchases), earlier this year there were calls for the reopening of DMC enrollment for 2020. However, Secretary Perdue (and others) expressed opposition to that, noting (paraphrasing) ‘that we had to let insurance work like insurance is supposed to work.’ Now, a month or two later, it seems like ‘insurance’ is working. Any thoughts or comments?FORDYCE: Long term, risk management through products like DMC will provide stability to the dairy industry just as they have to producers of other agricultural commodities. [The] USDA is committed to working with producers and other providers of risk management tools to improve these tools for the long term.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairyEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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Aeroflex Adds 26.5 GHz Capability to the 7700 Integrated Microwave Test System

first_imgAeroflex has introduced a 26.5 GHz high-frequency extension for the 7700 Integrated Microwave Test System. The 7700 frequency extension increases the frequency coverage of its test system from 6 GHz to 26.5 GHz, which will address the growing need for a compact, economical, high-frequency bench-top microwave test system. Its unique synthetic architecture and modular building-block design allows for a faster measurement throughput over conventional instrument-based systems while also providing improved flexibility and enhanced configuration options.The 7700 also comes with several standard built-in measurements, test executive software, and reporting tools to accelerate automated test development. The new product capability provides customers with a higher frequency range as well as the Aeroflex measurement quality. With the addition of the frequency extension, the 7700 has become a more powerful and complete bench-top test system available on the market today.last_img read more