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TX Ambulance Transporting Toddler Who Nearly Drowned Involved in Crash

first_imgFile Photo Related The ambulance carrying him to the hospital somehow became involved in a crash with another vehicle. He was taken to the hospital in a different ambulance, where he was listed in critical condition. Efficacy of Statewide Workshops in Implementing Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator in EMS AgenciesPreparing for Pediatric EmergenciesTreating Pediatric Summertime Emergencies A toddler who nearly drowned was in an ambulance that was involvedin a crash on the way to the hospital.center_img Police continue to investigate. Watch the report below. Details on the circumstances surrounding the ambulance crashand the boy being found in the hot tub were not released. The 20-month-old was found floating face down in a hot tub on Monday in the city of Magnolia, about an hour north west of Houston, KTRK-TV reports. A deputy arrived first and performed life-saving measures on the boy until medical personnel showed up.last_img read more

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Coccia reflects on Rhodes Scholarship, Notre Dame years

first_imgBrian Lach I The Observer After a term defined by social inclusion initiatives, Coccia and Joyce were succeeded by Lauren Vidal and Matthew Devine as student body president and vice president last spring.Plans for the futureCoccia said his work at the Department of Health and Human Services has given him broad exposure to public policy and shown him firsthand how public social and economic policies are interwoven.“It’s easy to silo things, but it’s taught me that a holistic framework for government is what’s important in terms of addressing an agenda and what we owe to each other as human beings and citizens,” he said. “I’ve been working on projects that are within my interest areas and that expand my interests.”The comparative social policy program at Oxford appeals to him because “it’s a good balance between theory and the nuts and bolts of how to make policies work,” Coccia said.“Social inclusion as a policy framework is being discussed in the United Kingdom and France, and it’s a stated part of the comparative social policy curriculum [at Oxford],” he said. “I’ve been interested in the theoretical foundations for policy and policymaking, and from what I’ve read, the comparative degree does a great job showing the implications of how we approach public policy and how it gets shaped.”The past few years have given him a “much greater clarity” for his future plans, Coccia said, and he hopes to get involved in public policy at some level in the future. Looking at public policy from a social inclusion perspective is productive because “it’s a holistic and multidimensional account of the policy, and it takes into account all kinds of factors in terms of wellbeing and how policies influence each other,” he said.The leadership strategy he developed at Notre Dame will continue to be part of his future approach, he said. As student body president, he developed a reputation for scheduling nonstop personal meetings with hundreds of students, faculty members and administrators as he worked to develop initiatives.“I’ll still try to meet with as many people as possible,” he said with a laugh. “I will very much look forward to being a student again, but given my nature, I’ll be wanting to be involved in other ways as much as possible too.”Fellowships at Notre DameAt Notre Dame, students who apply for the Rhodes Scholarship or dozens of other national fellowships, including the Fulbright program and the Marshall/Mitchell scholarships, work with the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE).“Alex did what we hope all students will do as undergraduates at Notre Dame,” said Deb Rotman, director of CUSE. “He took his learning experience beyond the classroom and took full advantage of all the resources on campus to discern his path, cultivate his gifts and serve as a transformational leader.”Rotman said students interested in applying for the Rhodes Scholarship or any of the other national fellowships should visit fellows.nd.edu for preliminary information and contact CUSE for more details about the application process.Tags: Alex Coccia, Alumni, public policy, Rhodes, social inclusion, Student government MICHAEL YU | The Observer Nancy Joyce, Alex Coccia and Fr. Pete McCormick lead a prayer service Sept. 22, 2013, in response to a sexual assault report. Coccia, a 2014 graduate,  is one of  32 Rhodes Scholars from the U.S. this year and will begin studying at the University of Oxford in October 2015.Coccia is one of 32 Rhodes Scholars from the U.S. this year and will begin a two-year Masters in Comparative Social Policy program at the University of Oxford in October.Rhodes ScholarshipsAccording to the Rhodes Trust website, 80 scholars from across the world are selected annually according to criteria outlined by the will of Cecil Rhodes. The scholarship provides funding for students to enroll in a program of their choice at the University of Oxford in England.The website lists the four criteria from Rhodes’ will as: “literary and scholastic attainments; energy to use one’s talents to the full, as exemplified by fondness for and success in sports; truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship; moral force of character and instincts to lead, and to take an interest in one’s fellow beings.”“What I proposed for my program of study as a Rhodes Scholar was that I really wanted to engage in social and economic policy with a framework of social inclusion,” Coccia said. “I applied for Rhodes last year as well as this year, and both years have just felt like there was an immense team supporting me.“I had faculty mentors who took time out of their schedules to prep me or write recommendation letters and my fellow students who helped me articulate what I wanted to do with the scholarship, so it feels like it’s really been a team effort.”Formative time at Notre DameCoccia said his interest in social policy is “a natural trajectory” from his work at Notre Dame, which focused on inclusion in many forms.“My academic experience in Africana Studies and Peace Studies helped me begin to ask the right questions that I could apply to my work in the [Progressive Student Alliance] or in student government,” he said.Nancy Joyce, a 2014 graduate and student body vice president for 2013-14, said she witnessed firsthand how Coccia embodies the Rhodes criteria.“During the time that Alex and I worked together, it was always very clear to me that Alex was – and is – motivated by the stories and experiences of those without a voice, and is willing to take up the fight for those individuals and groups,” she said. “Whether working for the establishment of Notre Dame’s first [Gay-Straight Alliance], for the healing of those affected by sexual violence, for the welcoming of undocumented students at Notre Dame or for the support of socioeconomically disadvantaged students on our campus, Alex has always been a champion of those who need one.”Ernesto Verdeja, director of undergraduate studies for the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies said he was “delighted, but not surprised” by the news.“In his time here as a Peace Studies student at the Kroc Institute, he excelled in his studies and became a noted leader on campus,” Verdeja said. “He has distinguished himself as a scholar and a leader, and I wish him all the best at Oxford.”Joyce said watching both of Coccia’s Rhodes application processes makes her “genuinely thrilled and incredibly excited for him.”“Winning the Rhodes is such a well-deserved opportunity and will only serve to better enable Alex to continue championing the causes and people that most need his truth, courage, devotion, leadership and moral force of character,” she said. By the time he graduated in May 2014, Alex Coccia was one of the most recognizable people at Notre Dame.He earned two monograms with the varsity fencing team, which won the 2011 NCAA title when he was a freshman.He majored in Africana Studies and Peace Studies, conducted research in Rwanda, served as a three-year FIRE starter peer educator in the Gender Relations Center and founded the 4 to 5 Movement to educate and empower LGBTQ allies on campus.While serving as the 2013-14 student body president, he led the “One is Too Many” campaign against campus sexual assault, helped change admissions policies so undocumented students could attend Notre Dame and worked to improve the campus climate for LGBTQ students.He earned a Truman-Albright Fellowship and currently works in the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington D.C., addressing issues from climate change to domestic violence prevention.And, as of last weekend, he became Notre Dame’s 15th Rhodes Scholar, the first since 2002.“It’s a big honor, and I’m very thankful,” Coccia said. “I see it as a team effort, though, so I wish I could be celebrating with people on campus.”last_img read more

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EB18: Shiny (and colorful) new 12-speed chains from KMC, Connex & Taya

first_imgThe12-speed versions bring all of the hollow pin, four-corner ramped shaping and other features as their 11s chains. This Ti-Black Gold uses a highly corrosion resistant coating that they’ve proven in industrial settings, but it’s environmentally friendly to produce! Check them out at TayaChain.com.(Update: We originally mistakenly listed the above products as Connex, but they are from Taya and available now)Connex goes greenThe new CKS chain lube if biodegradable and comes with a thin dropper to make application easy and avoid overuse. When it comes time to wash it off, the formula won’t pollute the water supply, either. Now you just have to find an equally clean degreaser…Check them out at ConnexChain.com.2019 KMC 12-speed & eBike chainsKMC has also moved to a 12-speed design, which also gets their top-level “X” plate shaping for crisp, quiet shifts.It’ll come in the gold version shown up top and with DLC-coated inner links and pins in your choice of blue, red, green or yellow. Outer links remain black to keep the color hit subdued, but visible.We’re seeing more and more e-bike specific drivetrain products now that the market is becoming so big and brands are seeing the downsides of using people-powered parts for bikes with motor assistance. KMC is solving the problem by making their first sprockets, available for front and rear, along with a chain specifically for them.What’s unique about them is the width…they use a wider tooth profile and chain, along with much larger diameter pins and rollers, to handle the increased torque. Check them out at KMCchain.com. Taya was showing off colorful new coatings for their 11-speed chains, which adds a bit of variety to the nickel-coated outer links, leaving the stainless steel inner links to contrast the color. Shown above and directly below, the blue Galaxy finish is the top level of their DHT (Diamond Hard Tech) chains that promise extended durability and quiet performance. And, now, 12-speed SRAM Eagle compatibility!last_img read more

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Slave Play Tony Nominee James Cusati-Moyer Tapped for Shonda Rhimes Series

first_img James Cusati-Moyer, who was Tony-nominated for his performance in Jeremy O. Harris’ Slave Play, has landed a recurring role on Shonda Rhimes’ Netflix series Inventing Anna. According to The Wrap, the 10-episode series adapts the New York Magazine article by Jessica Pressler about Anna Sorokin, a.k.a. Anna Delvey, the 28-year-old who faked being a German heiress to swindle New York elite out of more than $200,000. Cusati-Moyer will play Val, a stylist and fashion director who experiences the whiplash of a whirlwind friendship with Anna.David Frankel will direct the cast, which also includes Julia Garner in the title role, Anna Chlumsky, Laverne Cox, Katie Lowes and Alexis Floyd. A production schedule will be announced later.In addition to Slave Play (which he also appeared in off-Broadway), Cusati-Moyer has been seen on Broadway in the Trip Cullman-helmed revival of Six Degrees of Separation. Off-Broadway, he has appeared in Terrence McNally’s Fire and Air and The Devil in The Soldier’s Tale. His screen credits include False Positive, Prodigal Son, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, The Path, Red Oaks, Blue Bloods and Time After Time. View Comments Star Files James Cusati-Moyer(Photo: Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com) James Cusati-Moyerlast_img read more

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Segmentation sparks growth and member loyalty

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Data analysis tailors marketing messages to the most receptive members.Data analytics is a long-term strategy, according to a white paper from The Members Group (TMG), Des Moines, Iowa.Analysis aids segmentation, which has quickly become the magic word in credit card marketing.The goal is to get the right offer to the right cardholder at the right time, in a manner that’s most profitable for the portfolio and creates long-term loyalty among cardholders.Data analytics isn’t reinventing the wheel, but rather reshaping it among credit unions such as $1.7 billion asset Spokane (Wash.) Teachers Credit Union (STCU).Russell Palmer, STCU’s card services manager, became a proponent of business intelligence while working at a national bank. But he entered his new position without an instinct for card management, which made him keener to understand the credit union’s portfolio.“Data analytics was my answer to getting up to speed quickly, and it has worked extremely well,” Palmer says. “We’ve learned more about our cardholders and our portfolio than we’ve ever known.” continue reading »last_img read more

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February 1, 2012 Letters

first_imgFebruary 1, 2012 Letters Letters Foreclosures I am a 45-year member of The Florida Bar. I am now retired, and my only legal work concerns my subprime mortgage investment portfolio. With the collapse of the real estate market, many of the properties are worth half or less than what I have invested in them.Unfortunately, the legal system is not working for foreclosure plaintiffs. I am being told that I must wait up to six months to get a summary judgment hearing for an uncontested matter which will take all of five minutes. During that extended time, I am receiving no return on my investment, and, in many cases, the property is vacant, is deteriorating at a rapid rate, is subject to vandalism, and I am powerless to cut my losses. My assertions that I need an early hearing date to stave off disaster are met with a remarkable level of indifference.The mediation program only serves to further the delay and debit the plaintiff for an additional $750. The fact that the expense can be added to the mortgage amount due is utterly worthless. I read that only about 3.5 percent of the mediations result in an agreement. One hundred percent of the mediations result in greater losses for the plaintiffs.The Florida Bar has publicly taken the view that the defaulting homeowners are victims and that attorneys should provide pro bono work to keep them in homes they cannot pay for by almost any contrivance. Give The Florida Bar an “A” for not protecting the rights of all litigants.I understand that the current practices may work for the court system, but they do not for the plaintiffs. Some of those plaintiffs are struggling to protect their life savings.What state agency should people like me contact to seek compensation for the enormous losses which can be sustained by the mind-numbing delay?I am 70 years old this June. Is it too much that I would like to complete my foreclosure cases before I die?Richard J. Wiley Highland City Lack of Jury Trials Being an expert on all things like the “Modern Major General” of “HMS Pinafore” fame, I shall explain the ugly reasons people avoid trials like colonoscopies.The federal law and order patriots have 18 month go to trial and lose tax that is always levied and with great glee, I might add. Only the demented, desperate, or those who believe mistakenly that innocent until proven guilty means something, roll the loaded dice facing those odds.Just crossing off that tryant`s dream box would triple federal jury trials. If we have a law that says if a state attorney files a first degree murder charge and notifies the adoring public that death is on the line, there should be no turning back. He can`t use our holy death penalty as a hammer to beat out pleas for getaway drivers and crazy teenagers.We would have more trials and fewer farces, like seeking the death peanlty for a woman who kills her child, something that has not happened anywhere in this country for over 100 years. We should have no “ nolo contendre ” pleas for crimes that do not have civil consequences. Allowing some character to deny he broke the law on the courthouse steps after copping a deal would come to an end when he or she had to admit to being a perp or degenerate.One other thing, all these clowns who brag about being trial pros or have had helped 100,000 accident victims should have to go to court for real at least once every five years or pull down their ads.Charles B. Tiffany Kissimmee Death Penalty Five years ago, the ABA released a report developed by a team of Florida-based experts that included an elected state attorney, a former public defender, and a former Supreme Court chief justice, which raised serious concerns about Florida’s death-penalty process.The report neither supports nor opposes capital punishment; it focuses upon improving the administration of justice.But for the Florida Supreme Court’s adoption of the report’s findings and recommendations relating juror confusion in late 2009, with few exceptions, state officials have done little to remedy the problems.The alarming backdrop is that the Death Penalty Information Center, an independent Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, reports that since 1973, Florida has resentenced or exonerated more death-sentenced inmates than any other state.For example, Frank Lee Smith was exonerated posthumously after the actual perpetrator was identified. He died of cancer after languishing on death row for 14 years. Juan Melendez was exonerated after almost 18 years on death row after a taped confession by the real perpetrator was discovered.One of the report’s key findings notes that Florida is the only state that allows capital-case jurors to find an aggravating circumstance and recommend a death sentence by a simple majority vote, e.g., 7-5. All others require some form of unanimity.Writing for the majority in a strongly worded opinion in 2005, then-Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero called upon the Legislature to require unanimity insofar as any jury recommendation of death. Then-Gov. Jeb Bush said the issue was “definitely worth consideration” and cautioned legislators not to ignore the court. To date, the Legislature has been unresponsive.Last summer, U.S. District Judge Jose Martinez declared related aspects of Florida’s capital case sentencing scheme unconstitutional in Evans, a case out of the Southern District that is under appeal by the state.We may have reached a tipping point of sorts.Sen. Thad Altman, R-Melbourne, and Rep. John Patrick Julien D-North Miami Beach, filed a bill in anticipation of the 2012 regular session, incorporating feedback from Cantero, which would require unanimity for both jury recommendations of death, as well as for findings regarding the presence of specific aggravators. It has received considerable editorial board support.Simply put, enactment of their bill would represent a significant step forward in terms of improving the administration of justice. The immediate challenge is to get it calendared.Mark R. Schlakman Tallahassee Advertising With respect to Mr. Forman’s January 1 letter objecting to the ad by the “Small Christian Family Law Firm,” I have to wonder whether he would have been equally offended by a “Muslim Religious Liberties Firm.”More to the point, the Constitution guarantees both free exercise of religion and freedom of association. Therefore, an “association” of “Christians” for any particular legally sanctioned purpose cannot be constitutionally taboo.Mr. Forman objects that this is like “Whites Only.” Christianity is an ideology, not a skin color. Perhaps the firm prefers a particular approach to family law matters which is consistent with that ideology.Finally, Mr. Forman seems to imply that the News’ willingness to run the hiring ad is objectionable because it has a hint of religion to it. At some point, the specter of “establishment of religion” has to be reined in by common sense and reason. The News is not advocating or mandating anything — it is just running a legitimate advertisement in the same neutral fashion that it runs any other hiring ad.Thomas F. Harkins, Jr. Fort Worth, Texas_________________________Your Editor’s Note to Gerald Forman’s letter misses the point. Suppose the ad stated “Small white or male family law firm”? I believe African-American lawyers or women would take umbrage at the ad. The logical conclusion would be that only white lawyers or male lawyers apply. The same could be said for any reference to any implicit but not veiled exclusionary reference.The News need not accept all advertisements simply because they are legal. Rather, basic decency should also be applied in the judgment to accept the lucre from obviously prejudiced lawyers.In my opinion, this matter should be a subject of discussion at the next Florida Bar Board of Governors meeting.Richard N. Friedman Miami Errata A story in the January 15 News gave the wrong number of cases electronically filed with the court system in the past year. The correct number is almost 35,000. February 1, 2012 Letterslast_img
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Simmons opts for the logical approach

first_img October 15, 2016 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Simmons opts for the logical approach The senator often works with Bar sections on their priorities Senior Editor “You can’t let personality keep you from getting to the policy.” Sen. David Simmons, R-Longwood, takes that attitude into the high-visibility, high- pressure world of the Florida Legislature, where he is known for his thorough nuts-and-bolts approach. Some bills are at the center of major policy debates, and others are more pedestrian but necessary for the day-to-day operation of business and the legal system. Perhaps that’s an outgrowth of the rather unusual course this lawyer-legislator took to the legal profession and then public service. Simmons was a physics major at Tennessee Technological University when he read about Abraham Lincoln and “believed that anyone who has done what he has done, well, I wanted to emulate it.” So he changed his major from physics to math, a discipline studiously avoided by many lawyers. “My thinking is it would be more acceptable for someone going to law school,” Simmons said. “The beauty of being a math major or a science major is it teaches logic, and logic is a great thing for the law.” Graduating with top grades from the math department, Simmons attended Vanderbilt University Law School, where he received his law degree in 1977. He moved to Florida the same year and joined The Florida Bar. A few years later, Simmons was a founding partner of de Beaubien, Knight, Simmons, Mantzaris & Neal, where he is now financial managing partner. The firm has grown to 54 lawyers with offices in Orlando, Tampa, and Tallahassee. He is Florida Bar certified in civil trial and business litigation and also certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy. Simmons was elected to the Florida House in 2000 and was term limited out in 2008. In 2010, he was elected to the Senate and was re-elected in 2014 (he was unopposed this year). He cites the same reason for public service as why he became a lawyer: an admiration for Lincoln, who served several terms in the Illinois House. “He stands for everything that I believe a lawyer should be,” he said. During his service, Simmons has become associated with a number of high-profile and lesser publicized issues, often working with Bar sections on their priorities. He helped draft the state’s controversial Stand Your Ground bill and the constitutional amendment requiring future constitutional amendments must win 60 percent voter approval. He pushed bills requiring an ignition- lock device for repeat DUI offenders and another mandating that those who refuse Breathalyzer tests lose their license. He pushed bills for extra funds for low-performing elementary schools and then a bill calling for an extra school hour a day for low-performing elementary schools. “Done right, it has a dramatic impact and has been successful for those students in low-performing schools,” Simmons said. In 2013, he worked with the Business Law Section on an overhaul of the state’s Limited Liability Company laws (the first since 2002), and also pushed a glitch/update bill on those laws last year. This year he teamed with the section to pass a bill on collecting final judgments. “He’s a phenomenal legislator,” said Louis Conti, a former Business Law Section chair who has worked with Simmons on section legislative issues. “He has a real interest in what he is sponsoring. He cares about it. He wants to know the specifics, and he has very specific ideas about changes if he doesn’t like something.” Conti recalled that in the 2013 session, the LLC legislation was hanging in the balance on the last day, when it was questionable whether it would pass in the House before adjournment because of unrelated political tensions between the upper and lower chambers. Simmons crossed the Capitol rotunda and went on the House floor to help the House sponsor. “That’s the kind of influence he has, even as a senator going back to the House and saying, ‘Look, this is important legislation for the state and it should not get held up because of other matters,’” Conti said. “It was the last act approved and voted on in the Legislature in 2013.” “It’s a pleasure to work with him. Sen. Simmons is one of those public servants who has a great deal of integrity and is also extremely smart and extremely knowledgeable,” said Paul Jess, deputy executive director of the Florida Justice Association. “He is a brilliant lawyer, extremely intelligent, and a great draftsman. He is extremely good at drafting legislation. . . that is very clear to the point and understandable. “When he doesn’t agree with me, it’s always for a very sound public policy or legal reason from his point of view.” A favorite Simmons saying, attributed to Martin Luther King, Jr., is “It’s always the right time to do the right thing,” Jess said. He pointed to Simmons’ impassioned speech in 2014 on the Senate Floor for legislation that allowed José Manuel Godinez-Samperio, an undocumented immigrant and honor student, to become a Bar member, adding, “In these particular times, it’s not always the most politically expedient thing for a Republican to support helping an undocumented person. But Sen. Simmons. . . did exactly that.” As Simmons sees it, “I believe that politics and legislation are the art of what can be done rather than trying to get 100 percent of what you want. It’s the art of compromise, and you have to be able to say, ‘I’m satisfied at this point in time to get 60 percent or 70 percent of what I want,’ and not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” He has used that clout to advocate for the profession and the judiciary. “Sometimes, when you’ve got one of the best judiciaries in the world. . . you leave it alone to do what it’s supposed to do,” Simmons said. “What I’ve pushed for is extra funding and the assurance the judiciary is given the proper funding so it can do what it does best, and that is provide justice and do it expeditiously.” He’d also like to see more lawyers in the Legislature. “My legal training has been the mark by which I’ve been able to achieve the things I’ve been able to achieve in the Legislature, particularly in the Senate,” Simmons said. “There have been multiple times that I have sat down, when two or three conflicting sides are trying to work out language or trying to evolve something, and I will draft it right there and send it to bill drafting.” He expects to have plenty of opportunities to put that training to use in the next session or two. Two recent Supreme Court rulings on workers’ compensation (including one saying workers’ lawyers deserve fair fees) will place that issue back before lawmakers, he said. A number of environmental and water quality issues must be addressed, he said, including spending environmental funds earmarked by Amendment 1, passed by voters two years ago. “We’re going to have to deal with the relationship between Florida and the federal government related to Lake Okeechobee and demanding that the Corps of Engineers do what it is supposed to do, which is not only flood protection but protecting our environment, both with respect to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers [which have been fouled by pollution released from the lake],” Simmons said. Another likely issue will be PIP insurance coverage. “It’s a broken system. We tried to fix it three years ago. Go back in history and see how many times we’ve tried to fix PIP since the early 1970s,” he said. While PIP started with $10,000 coverage more than 40 years ago, that would be worth around $35,000 in today’s dollars, Simmons said, but instead compensation has been cut to $2,500 except in emergencies. “It’s no wonder people question the constitutionality of PIP as being an inadequate substitute for a common law cause of action,” he said. Simmons also expects a renewed look at term limits for judges. The House in 2015 passed a constitutional amendment limiting the appellate judiciary to two six-year terms, but the Senate never considered it. Simmons said he opposes judicial term limits.center_img Simmons opts for the logical approachlast_img read more

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Justice Perry set to retire

first_imgJustice Perry set to retire Justice James E.C. Perry will retire from the Florida Supreme Court on December 30, and the court gathered December 7 to honor his service. “After over 16 years of proudly serving the citizens of the state of Florida, first as a circuit judge and currently as a justice of the Florida Supreme Court, I am constitutionally mandated to retire by the end of my current term,’’ Perry wrote in a letter delivered to the governor’s office.Those speaking at the event at the Supreme Court in Tallahassee included former Justices Major Harding and Joseph Hatchett, Bar President Bill Schifino, and Antonya Johnson, president of the Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of the National Bar Association.Gov. Jeb Bush appointed Perry, a trial judge in the state’s 18th Judicial Circuit, which includes Seminole and Brevard counties, in March 2000. Gov. Charlie Crist appointed Perry to the state’s high court in March 2009. Florida’s 85th justice, Perry is the fourth African-American to serve on the Florida Supreme Court. He grew up in the segregated South and decided to become a lawyer the night the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated in 1968. Perry had never even met a lawyer. But that evening, he knew he wanted “to be an instrument of change, to make a difference.” He had a chance to put that philosophy into action not long after graduating from Columbia Law School in 1972 and returning to the South, where he was hired by the Georgia Indigent Legal Services and sat for his bar exam. At the time, Georgia had 38 black attorneys in the state. The state generally passed three black applicants a year — a graduate of the University of Georgia, a graduate of Emory University, and one other graduate. Perry and 49 other black applicants took Georgia’s bar exam in June 1972. None of them passed. Perry, who had passed the multi-state exam but not the Georgia Bar, decided to sue the Georgia Board of Bar Examiners. Sixteen other applicants joined him in the federal lawsuit, which alleged violations of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as well as due process and equal protection. While James E.C. Perry et al. v. Edward S. Sell, Jr., et al., was still in litigation, the February 1973 Georgia bar exam was administered. Perry and 23 other black applicants passed the exam. A few months later, another 24 black applicants passed the exam. In a very short time, the number of black attorneys in Georgia more than doubled. Perry soon moved to Florida, where he began working with the Seminole Employment and Economic Development Corp. in Sanford. He passed the Florida bar exam in 1975 and went into private practice, specializing in civil and business law as a senior partner in Perry & Hicks, P.A. Perry’s appointment to the trial bench in Central Florida in 2000 made him the first African-American judge in Florida’s 18th Judicial Circuit. The judges of the circuit elected him to serve as chief judge of the circuit for a two-year term beginning in July 2003. When he applied for an opening on the Florida Supreme Court nine years later, Perry wrote that his legal career had been more rewarding and fulfilling than he could have imagined and that his commitment to the fundamental principles of the rule of law was stronger than ever. “The United States legal system, though flawed, is arguably the best in the world, and I am proud to be one of its humble servants,’’ he wrote. Perry’s family includes his wife, Adrienne M. Perry, and three grown children, two of whom are lawyers. December 1, 2016 Regular Newscenter_img Justice Perry set to retirelast_img read more

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Guilty Gift-Giving

first_imgThe Washington Post: If it’s the thought that counts when giving gifts, why do so many of us get so stressed during the holidays?It’s because you often feel guilty for not giving more even if you can’t afford it.“There’s a lot of guilt and social comparison in holiday shopping,” psychology professor Susan Krauss Whitbourne of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst told Karen Cheney of Money Magazine.Cheney says: “Want to beat your psychology and that post-holiday hangover? Simply use these strategies to get the names crossed off your list — without crossing into the red.”Read the whole story: The Washington Post More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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News Scan for Jun 05, 2019

first_imgECDC spotlights NDM-producing CRE outbreak in Tuscany region, ItalySince November 2018, hospitals in the Tuscany region of Italy have reported 350 cases of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM)-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reported yesterday in a rapid risk assessment.”Due to its size and the resulting change in the epidemiology of CRE, the reported outbreak is a significant event, despite previous endemicity of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenamase (KPC)-producing CRE in this geographic area,” the ECDC said. “The change in the type of carbapenemase further reduces treatment options because NDM-producing CRE are not susceptible to some of the new beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations such as ceftazidime-avibactam and meropenem-vaborbactam.”The 350 cases were reported by seven Tuscan hospitals from November 2018 through May 2019. Of the infections, 242 are gastrointestinal, 50 bloodstream, 43 urinary tract, and 15 respiratory tract. The isolates are resistant to aminoglycosides but susceptible to fosfomycin and colistin.The ECDC said that sporadic cases of NDM-producing CRE acquired outside of hospitals have been reported in other European countries, but cases have mostly been tied to healthcare settings. “Therefore, the risk of acquisition of NDM-producing CRE related to this outbreak is likely restricted to persons with recent healthcare,” the agency said.Response steps include further epidemiologic analysis of the cases, assessment of active surveillance for CRE carriage at the hospitals, and a meeting with hospital directors in Tuscany to relay information and reinforce infection control measures.Jun 4 ECDC rapid risk assessment Vaccitech announces launch of universal flu vaccine challenge trialVaccitech, a biotechnology company based in Oxford, England, today announced that it has vaccinated the first participants in a phase 2b flu challenge trials of its universal influenza A vaccine MVA-NP+M1 (VTP-100).In a press release, the company said it is conducting the trial in Antwerp, Belgium, among 155 participants who will randomly receive VTP-100 or placebo, of which 134 will be challenged with the A/Belgium/4217/2015 H3N2 influenza virus strain. Results are expected in early 2020.The trial has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Belgium Regulatory Authority. The flu challenge study is partly funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Biomedical Advances Research and Development Authority (BARDA).Also, Vaccitech said its Australian subsidiary has finished vaccinating 2,200 participants in the first year of a phase 2b field trial designed to assess if VTP-100 may provide added protection when given as an adjunct to current licensed quadrivalent seasonal flu vaccines.The company—a University of Oxford spin-off—is developing the VPT-100 both as a prepandemic vaccine and an add-on to a seasonal vaccine, especially in people at high risk for flu complications. The vaccine targets MVA, a replication-deficient pox virus vector that has been shown to prompt a strong immune response against matrix 1 (M1) and nucleoprotein (NP) flu antigens, which are highly conserved among influenza A subtypes.Jun 5 Vaccitech press release FDA approves storage change for Emergent’s oral cholera vaccineEmergent BioSolutions yesterday announced that the FDA has approved a change in storage conditions for Vaxchora, its oral cholera vaccine. The step allows storage of the vaccine to shift from frozen to refrigerated at 2°C to 8°C (35.6°F to 46.4°F).In a statement, the company also said the FDA’s approval allows the transfer of bulk drug substance manufacturing from Emergent’s product development facility in San Diego to its manufacturing facility in Bern, Switzerland. It also covers labeling changes related to the two developments.Vaxchora is the only FDA-licensed vaccine to prevent Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1.Sean Kirk, Emergent’s executive vice president of manufacturing and technical operations, said in the statement, “Emergent is pleased with this FDA approval that enables a more robust supply chain process for our oral cholera vaccine and maximizes capacity utilization of our manufacturing facilities.” He added that the step also better positions the company for a 2020 launch of the vaccine in Europe.Jun 4 Emergent BioSolutions press releaselast_img read more

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The Season Of Giving At Del Norte Credit Union Brings Smiles To Local Communities

first_imgDNCU News:Following the cooperative spirit of People Helping People, DNCU makes the holidays brighter with several initiatives starting on International Credit Union Day and through the month of DecemberSANTA F— Del Norte Credit Union (DNCU), Northern New Mexico’s hometown financial cooperative reinforces their mission of Improving Lives in the last months of the year by calling it their Season of Giving.Although the credit union supports and sponsors initiatives, events, and causes year-round, the last few months of the year are filled with joy and warmth for the DNCU team. It all starts on International Credit Union day, celebrated Oct. 17, DNCU spends the day at their adopted park and gives back to their beloved community of Española. DNCU adopted Valdez Park in 2015 and since then has helped maintain the cleanliness of the park and donated funds to upgrade some of the facilities.“This year, we decided to clean the park on International Credit Union Day to remind our team and our community that our number one goal is to be an active participant in our local communities and to bring a positive impact to those who need it most,” DNCU President/CEO Chuck Valenti said. “As a cooperative, we work together to bring world-class financial services to New Mexico, and we also work together to better our communities.”Following their park clean up DNCU’s Season of Giving included two elementary schools in Los Alamos and White Rock: Aspen Elementary and Chamisa Elementary. Both schools are situated where DNCU’s legacy first began 65 years ago as Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Credit Union. For the past three years, DNCU has helped fund Thanksgiving lunches for both schools. The lunch that is provided serves school faculty and students.“This small gesture of kindness reminds us of our roots, where it all began, and the importance of never forgetting the communities that continue to inspire our credit union to be the best in every way possible,” said AVP of Branch Service Delivery at Los Alamos and White Rock, Matt Waldschmidt. “Seeing those kids faces light-up and tell you how much they love DNCU is a wonderful feeling. We are building relationships that last a lifetime, and that’s what we nurture at our branches.”Nov. 15, DNCU finalized its fifth annual coat drive that supports youth shelters across Northern New Mexico. Five organizations picked up thousands of coats, scarves, gloves, and socks that DNCU members and employees donated.“Every year our coat drive just keeps getting bigger and bigger, we even had members bring monetary donations that we would then take to stores and purchase new coats with,” said Carolyn Agard, AVP of Branch Service Delivery at the Midtown Financial Center in Santa Fe.Nov. 27, DNCU delivered Thanksgiving dinners to area firefighters and first responders that work through the holiday. In total, 17 boxed dinners were delivered that fed about 170 firefighters and their families from Santa Fe City Fire Department, Los Alamos County Fire Department, Española Valley Fire Station, Pecos Fire Station and Ojo Sarco Fire Station.“DNCU learned about the stories of our first responders, and the fact that many of them can’t spend time at home with their loved-ones during the holidays. That’s why DNCU graciously partners up with food markets to provide them with these dinner boxes,” said Cecilia Roybal, AVP of Branch Service Delivery at the DeVargas location in Santa Fe North.And in December, DNCU is surprising families at grocery stores for their annual Grocery Giveaway. A total of 62 DNCU employees have a $100 budget each to surprise any family and help pay for their groceries during the month of December.“Our team loves this initiative and the joy and warmth that it brings you to be able to do this,” said Eric Baldonado, VP of Service Delivery. “We are humbled that DNCU allows us to do this, but we are also proud that our credit union designs creative ways to bring cheer to our community during the holidays—we wouldn’t have it any other way.”To find out more about DNCU’s community development and to find out how easy it is to become a member, visit dncu.orgAbout Del Norte Credit Union   Chartered in 1954, Del Norte Credit Union is a not-for-profit cooperative celebrating 65 years of dedication to helping its members achieve financial success by being a trusted source of unbiased financial advice. Today DNCU serves more than 51,000 members throughout New Mexico.last_img read more

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Jefferies Adds Automotive Aftermarket Investment Banking Team

first_imgSensata’s investment will enable Pitstop to work towards the goal of offering a ‘bumper-to-bumper’ prognostics platform. This collaboration allows both companies to enhance product features, build additional prediction algorithms and create new business models. “At a time when vehicle connectivity is growing at an exponential rate, Pitstop’s predictions are perfectly positioned to extract as much value from the growing complexity of a vehicle” said Shiva Bhardwaj, founder and CEO, Pitstop. “With Sensata as a partner and investor, we are solving a core pillar for the connected car industry and creating a substantial financial impact for the transportation market.”Advertisement Jefferies LLC has hired Rex Green and Jonathan Carey as managing directors and global co-heads of Automotive Aftermarket Investment Banking.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementThey will jointly lead an eight-person team focused on serving automotive aftermarket companies from suppliers and distributors to retailers and professional installers in every niche of the $300 billion global automotive aftermarket. The team is based in the firm’s Boston office.Green and Carey have jointly focused on the automotive aftermarket since 2002, and established BB&T’s Automotive Aftermarket industry practice in 2004.Green has more than 25 years of industry experience and was most recently managing director responsible for a number of investment banking groups at BB&T Capital Markets. Prior to joining BB&T, he was a managing director at Advest Inc., and prior to that, was partner-In-charge of corporate finance for the New England region of KPMG Peat Marwick LLP. Green received his Masters of Business Administration from The Stern School at New York University and his Bachelor of Arts from Brown University.Carey has more than 14 years of industry experience and was most recently managing director and head of the automotive aftermarket investment banking practice at BB&T Capital Markets. Prior to joining BB&T, he was in the investment banking group at Advest Inc. and prior to that he began his career with Ernst & Young LLP. Carey received his Masters of Business Administration from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and Bachelor of Arts from The George Washington University.,Pitstop, an automotive predictive maintenance platform, recently announced a Series A round of funding led by Sensata Technologies, a global industrial technology company and a leading provider of sensor-rich solutions that create insights for customers, with participation from existing investors Ripple Ventures and Hike Ventures. Pitstop will use the funds to expand market reach, enhance product features and build additional prediction algorithms for the automotive industry. The amount of the Series A funding was undisclosed.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Commenting on the announcement, Jason Merszei, VP for Sensata’s Global Safety and Mobility Segment, said, “Our team at Sensata works every day to deliver the solutions that will help drive a smarter, more connected and cleaner world. We are looking forward to sharing knowledge and developing technologies with Pitstop, as we jointly address the Smart & Connected megatrend in the automotive landscape.” center_img Pitstop’s prognostics platform aggregates data to identify vehicle failure before it happens. The comprehensive platform ingests time-series data from vehicle telematics and text-based event data logged by industry experts to classify its models. This data is then pulled into a data engine where machine learning and artificial intelligence is used to create predictions such as component level failures for batteries, engines or brakes weeks before it happens. Pitstop has reduced vehicle downtime by as much as 25 percent, which leads to time and money saved for the supply chain. Pitstop is used by Enterprise, OEMs, fleets and vehicle owners to better understand and organize maintenance needs, allowing them to reduce downtime and lower repair costs.last_img read more

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Red Lion Controls – PAX2C controller

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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GDG Presents Innovative Pile Installation Methods in Edinburgh

first_imgThe annual International Conference on Offshore Wind Substructures was held in Edinburgh last week, where the latest trends in foundation design and innovations in substructure technology were discussed. This two day event facilitated lively discussion among attendees from across the supply chain regarding how foundation engineering may contribute to reducing the levellised cost of energy. All stakeholder classes were represented including developers, contractors and designers.Engineering Consultant, Gavin and Doherty Geosolutions Ltd. (GDG), delivered a presentation on Novel Pile Installation Methods, which covered vibratory piling techniques and the impact of pre-drilling on pile capacity.Vibratory pile installation is gaining traction across the offshore sector due to advantages that can include lower noise levels, reduced installation time, and less discrete marine operations. The benefits of vibratory pile installation are often not fully realised due to uncertainties about their load carrying behaviour.At the Edinburgh conference, Paul Doherty, Managing Director at GDG, presented the preliminary findings from a research study funded by the Deep Foundations Institute in the USA which investigated this topical issue. The outcome of this work suggests that vibratory piles have axial resistances which are typically 25% lower than impact driven piles with the same geometry.This study also highlighted that in the offshore environment, where installation time can be critical and lateral loads often dominate (rather than axial capacity), vibratory installed pile foundations may still offer significant cost savings. It should always be noted that the value of a specific pile installation technique is very site specific and needs to take into account the local ground conditions and geohazards.In ground where shallow bedrock or very hard soils may pose a challenge to traditional pile driving or vibratory pile installation, pre-drilling may prove a cost effective means of optimising the foundation design. By using a pilot drill ahead of the pilot toe to reduce stresses, open ended steel piles may be driven to high tensile resistances despite hard layers that may otherwise cause refusal.The term “Drive-Drill-Drive” has been used to describe this installation technique, which is currently being considered for a wind farm project in the Firth of Forth in Scotland. GDG are currently working with developers Mainstream Renewable Power to develop empirical correlations form a suite of onshore pile tests in representative geological conditions, which will allow further optimisation using the Drive-Drill-Drive installation technique.Image: GDGlast_img read more

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Hanoi plans elevated suburban

first_imgDEVELOPMENT of a high-capacity cross-city suburban railway in Hanoi could be completed by 2010, DSVN confirmed last month, following approval of pre-feasibility studies by the Vietnamese government. Prime Minister Phan Van Khai also indicated that the government would fund between 50% and 60% of the estimated 9200bn dong cost. The Ministry of Transport plans to seek international loans and joint venture funding.According to DSVN Director-General Nguyen Huu Bang, a 25 km section of the existing north-south main line between Ngoc Hoi and Yen Vien, which now runs at street level through the heart of the city, would be rebuilt on an elevated alignment and converted to mixed gauge double track. The Long Bien bridge over the Red River would be rebuilt, and a new bridge will cross the Dong River. Hanoi station would be reconstructed as a bus-rail interchange, topped by a 15 to 21 storey office complex.A frequent standard-gauge suburban service operating at up to 80 km/h will complement the existing metre-gauge main line operations. Suburban services would initially be worked by diesel multiple-units but electrification is envisaged at a later date. Trains would run at 5min intervals at peak times, each carrying up to 450 passengers.Subject to detailed planning and tendering later this year, work is expected to get underway in 2005 with the northern section from Hanoi to Gia Lam and Ngoc Hoi completed by 2009.last_img read more

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South Wales Metro ECI contracts awarded

first_imgUK: Transport for Wales has awarded Balfour Beatty, Alun Griffiths and Siemens Mobility early contractor involvement contracts ahead of procurement for the first stages of the South Wales Metro project.The project which is scheduled to be completed in 2023 covers modernisation, capacity enhancement and electrification works on branch lines around Cardiff and the delivery of a new fleet of Stadler EMUs. The ECI contracts announced on June 21 cover planning and design of the control systems, trackwork, stations and the maintenance depot at Taff’s Well.‘The development of the metro will be a major boost to the local economy of South Wales, creating jobs directly and in the local supply chain’, said TfW Chief Executive James Price. ‘We will work closely with Balfour Beatty, Alun Griffiths and Siemens as they help us develop our vision of a high quality, safe, integrated, affordable and accessible transport network of which the people of South Wales are proud.’last_img read more