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HOPE Pregnancy Providing Remote Services

first_imgHOPE Pregnancy Center News:HOPE Pregnancy Center continues to serve our community through remote parent mentoring, material assistance porch-drops and take-home pregnancy tests.  HOPE’s offices have remained closed since March 16 due to the stay-at-home mandate and to ensure staff and client health and safety and will remain closed until further notice. HOPE’s in-person activities and events are on hold until meeting restrictions due to COVID-19 are lifted and the board and staff agree that the safety of the participants can be reasonably ensured.Even though HOPE’s offices are closed, clients are still receiving remote parent mentoring and check-ins through phone calls and video chats, material assistance through contactless porch-drops, take-home pregnancy tests and referrals to other community resources as needs arise.  The support of the community has ensured that services are still provided and HOPE staff remains employed.“We’re thankful for the support of the Los Alamos community,” HOPE Executive Director Kim Ferguson said. “As the COVID pandemic continues, client needs have increased. HOPE has seen an increase in requests for parent mentoring services since the start of the stay-at-home order, and we’ve been checking in with clients to make sure that they are not completely isolated. We’ve also had an increase in individuals registering for services, including those requesting material assistance. As always, HOPE’s services are free to all, and we’re happy to help in whatever ways we can.”As HOPE continues meeting client needs, some specific material donations are needed:Diapers of all sizes;Baby Wipes;Baby shampoo;Lotion;Diaper rash cream;Sunblock; and Toiletries/consumables.To arrange for HOPE’s services or donate material items, call or text 505.500.4165 or email office@hpcla.org. To learn more about HOPE, visit www.hpcla.org.About HOPEHOPE Pregnancy Center, Inc., is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit agency that upholds the sanctity of human life by providing individuals and families with free spiritual, physical, and emotional support related to reproductive health, parenting and relationships. At HOPE’s core is the understanding that healthy relationships build strong communities and all people need loving, honest support, no matter their age, circumstances or choices. The staff and volunteers at HOPE are committed to walking alongside clients throughout their relationships, pregnancy and parenting.HOPE serves all individuals with respect and compassion, regardless of demographics.last_img read more

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The rebirth of Manchester: GL Hearn forum

first_imgIn the early 1980s, Manchester was in decline, the city’s traditional industries were dying off and the population was falling.Fast-forward to today, and the city has been transformed. Major development projects such as Spinningfields and MediaCity have changed the face of the city and many others like Mayfield are in the pipeline.GL Hearn brought together a panel of experts to discuss the factors behind Manchester’s success, such as civic leadership, long-term planning and investment in public transport, and considered what valuable insights other cities could learn from it.The panel also discussed how to secure the continued success and growth of Manchester and the key challenges that city and town centres face today, including an over-reliance on retail. DM: It’s also about understanding the commercial world and its drivers. Not all places understand how the sector works. The city’s leaders always meet people and talk to them at great length to really understand where they are coming from and what their drivers are and the value they can add. It is something that’s pretty unique here.DS: Members have got to understand that the private sector has got to make a profit. When I first started that wasn’t there. If you wanted to do a joint venture, there was a view in local authorities that making a profit was a bad thing. That was what changed in Manchester in the 1980s – the acceptance that to get growth you needed partners and they weren’t going to invest unless there was a return there.How can regeneration be spread from the city centre to the suburbs and the surrounding towns?DM: At a local level, the tram system extending to the surrounding towns was a significant investment that is really starting to bring life to those town centres that have been struggling. It brings places much closer to the city centre. You will see those town centres getting more residential development and more regeneration. You can already see land values starting to increase.JB: There’s an opportunity to reshape the uses in those town centres. This needs a mix of residential and some commercial schemes that stack up. That’s not necessarily grade-A office space; in fact, it invariably won’t be. But it is about creating really interesting spaces that go with the grain of the businesses in those areas. It has to draw on all of Manchester’s ability to do partnerships.How do you tackle the oversupply of retail in a lot of city and town centres?JH: People are too slow to accept change. Some of the town centres around the city core are fantastic and have the most amazing buildings. Actually trying to focus on retail and trying to keep hold of that retail centre is probably wrong. Does it matter if you convert some of those old retail units into apartments and people come back and live there? That’s part of the city growing and maturing. If they are going home and spending money near home, that’s going to encourage the development of local cafés, breweries and bakeries. It becomes a virtuous circle.TH: I’m a great believer in town centres but they’ve lost their way. The much-trumpeted example is Altrincham. Now it’s not every town that can have a trendy food market but it does reflect a wider trend. Everything used to be about convenience. You would drive to your supermarket and do all your shopping in one place. But now it’s more about experience. Town centres can offer that experience, it is something they can capitalise on. PanellistsJessica Bowles, director of strategy, BruntwoodHarry Dhaliwal, managing director, First Step GroupJames Heather, development director, U&ITim Heatley, co-founder, Capital & CentricEddie Smith, strategic director of development, Manchester City CouncilDavid Smith-Milne, managing director, PlacefirstDuncan Sutherland, regeneration director, Sigma CapitalDeborah McLaughlin, managing director, GL HearnGuy Montague-Jones, deputy editor, PropertyWeek (chair) GL Hearn assembled a strong collection of speakers in ManchesterAnd the assets that we’ve got in the city; we didn’t knock all the mills down and build a new city. We’ve embraced the culture and the assets so that developers such as Tim are bringing back some of the most beautiful buildings in the city, respecting the heritage. Manchester has also been courageous in not accepting the first investment that lands on its lap but choosing investment that is really going to add value long term.TH: That’s something Manchester does well – ensuring those who are developing the city have a long-term horizon. Other cities could be accused of having poor-quality developers and architecture that’s not added much and actually puts other long-term developers off because they know they are going to be undercut by low-quality product.Is there a blueprint that other towns and cities can employ?TH: For me it was relatively straightforward because I’ve grown up here seeing great architects and great developers, people like Bruntwood, Urban Splash, Ask and Muse, delivering fantastic buildings. So when other places say ‘can you come to our city and bring some of that Manchester stuff you do?’ I say ‘sure, I’ll bring my little black book of Manchester rules’. But really, you can’t masterplan a swagger or an attitude. It’s in the spirit of the people here. It’s hard to say what the checklist is.But are there at least some elements that other places can learn from, such as having a clear long-term plan?DSM: The whole landscape of city development is littered with strategies and failed delivery. It’s not just about the vision, it’s the tenacity to squeeze the pips out of everything. That’s what the city council is pretty good at. You look at Oxford Road – there was huge investment in hospital infrastructure, huge investment in the university. The city council didn’t just observe and enjoy that happening. The city council put a strategy together and squeezed the benefits out, economically, socially, culturally and from a retail perspective. That’s what you don’t see in a lot of other cities.  Actually, you often see quite passive civic leadership.TH: When talking to chief executives of other cities about the black book of Manchester rules, one of things you’ve got to deliver is projects in areas where the pizza delivery man won’t go – places like Salford Quays. That’s where Manchester has been brave enough and bold enough to tackle.center_img Market House food hall in AltrinchamES: Altrincham is fascinating. You had the most affluent community living around it but it was dead. You get one individual who comes along with a brilliant idea and works with the council. The catalytic effect that one individual has had on the town centre can’t be understated. Other places like Ramsbottom are also thriving. But yes there are places that are suffering. They need to be fundamentally rethought. We need to think about the purpose of those places. For me it’s about living and work. You have to be brave and think long term.DM: You need agility as well. You can have your plan but have to be aware the way we work and live is changing so quickly you can’t set in stone what your town centre is going to look like in 20 years. For example, people work more flexibly than we ever thought – having more flexible workspace available would be a great use of under-occupied retail.What are the key challenges for Manchester going forward and how can the city ensure it remains successful?ES: There’s a brutal fact confronting Manchester – we are going to run out of land. The city is going to run out of land in 15 years. We think that by the end of the 2220s we will have close to 700,000 to 750,000 people living in the city so the surrounding towns will have to play a key role in sustaining the city regions growth trajectory. They need to ensure they’re creating the right employment opportunities that can no longer and should no longer be served from the city centre and provide places for people to live. The role of public transport systems in that cannot be underestimated.HD: Tech is going to be really important – everything from the rise of autonomous vehicles and electric cars to ways of working and shopping. The whole of modern living is on pendulum swing. The vision that we talk about in 1984 was 20 years ahead of its time. Whatever is written now has to be 20 years ahead again to keep Manchester and the surrounding region prospering.in association with 2 St Peters Square in the city centre is part of Manchester’s ever-changing skylineSource: Mosley Street VenturesWhat are the key factors behind Manchester’s regeneration?ES: I’ve lived here for 33 years and I’ve worked for the council for nearly 20 years. I came to Manchester from Northern Ireland to escape a war basically and back then Manchester was not a great place. In fact, I would say back in 1986 Belfast was a better city than Manchester. What’s happened in the past 32 years is the death and rebirth of a city.The essential DNA of that has been very strong civic leadership that has embedded itself in a collaborative partnership-based approach to transforming the fortunes of the city and clear recognition of what was required to change its trajectory.It all kicked off with the 1984 city centre plan, which was the most transformative document ever written about the city. It talked about things like the need for light rail systems and it talked about the need for residential growth within the city centre. That plan laid the foundations for so much of what you see today and people still reference that document in the town hall to see what was said about parts of the city we’ve yet to get to.“What’s happened in the past 32 years is the death and rebirth of a city”Eddie Smith, Manchester City CouncilDS: Manchester was a mess. I remember when I joined English Tourist Board in 1986 and one of the first things I did there was a joint venture with Sir Howard Bernstein and Ted Kitchen [at Manchester City Council], Trafford and Salford councils for Castlefield and up to Salford Quays. That was the first time I sensed there was a real move from the city to do things. You wouldn’t recognise Castlefield at the time. It was just scrap yards. Nobody would go there. In fact, very few people came to the city centre. So the move to change was because of the personalities at the time really wanting to move things forward. I’ve been involved with Manchester ever since and when you look at what’s happened it is about the personalities in the city and their willingness to drive things forward and work in partnership.So the way Manchester has developed over the past 30 years is definitely down to the work of individuals rather than product of economic forces?DSM: I think definitely leadership as opposed to broader economic forces. I met an econometrician from Oxford Economics who had a forecast model looking at Liverpool, Manchester and Hull in the 1980s. It was a forecast based upon underlying economic indicators in 1980 and predicted that Manchester and Hull were going to follow a very similar economic trajectory. The long-term infrastructural and economic ingredients were very similar, so it can’t just be about location or basic infrastructure. It’s about the quality of the plan and the leadership behind the plan.DM: What’s different here is the courage to be innovative such as leading the way in devolution to city regions. There is something about the culture of place. You can’t necessarily lift and replicate what happened in Manchester somewhere else because Manchester’s strength is around its culture, its innovation, its history and its heritage.last_img read more

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ASA Announces Two New Hires

first_imgI-CAR CEO & President John Van Alstyne said, “What a fantastic way to support an important cause. A couple I-CAR committees worked with CREF to innovate their normal golf outing fundraisers in the face of COVID earlier this year with great success, and the same can be expected here. I-CAR committees across the U.S. are increasingly focused on supporting career technical schools as our industry seeks more qualified and capable talent.  This event will be a fun and easy way to support that goal.”  Ford Performance Racing School has donated two passes, a $4,000 value, that will be awarded to the virtual gofer with the best score at the end of the tournament. NORTH RICHLAND HILLS, Texas – The Automotive Service Association (ASA) has announced two recent hires. Janie Jeffries has been named director of membership and John Clark has joined the organization as editor/content manager for AutoInc. Magazine.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementJeffries comes to ASA from Colorado Springs with experience in direct sales and corporate management at brands such as Sara Lee, Coca-Cola, Coors and Kellogg.“ASA has had a longstanding history of providing valuable membership benefits to automotive service and collision repair shops,” Jeffries says. “I’m looking forward to increasing that value and making our whole membership process more efficient.”Clark joins ASA after serving as the editor of in-flight magazines for American Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines. Most recently, he worked at the Boy Scouts of America as the managing editor of Scouting magazine. He says his priority is “to help evolve the magazine’s readability and relevance to further the association’s goals and to develop social media resources that provide useful tools for the ongoing success of automotive service businesses.”,To raise additional support for high school and college collision school programs, the Collision Repair Education Foundation (CREF) will be collaborating with 90 I-CAR volunteer committee groups nationwide on a winter virtual golf fundraiser, exclusively sponsored by PPG Automotive. This event will be a private tournament within TopGolf’s online game, which will be held from Friday, Nov. 20 through Sunday, Dec. 20. Golfers will be able to play an unlimited number of rounds of virtual golf during those 30 days, while viewing an in-game leaderboard to see how they are doing compared to others golfing from around the country. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement The 90 I-CAR volunteer committees will be promoting this fundraiser not only to their local industry members, but also the general public as the more local virtual golfers that participate, the more funding will be raised for their local collision school programs. Also, with the event being virtual, zero golfing skill is required, and golfers can play from the comfort of their home.Advertisement To help raise additional funds for local collision school programs, when paying their $25 registration fee online, golfers will be able to select one of the 90 participating I-CAR volunteer committees and $20 of their registration fee will be reinvested into collision schools in that specific market. center_img CREF Director of Development, Brandon Eckenrode noted, “We are excited about how this one event will bring together 90 I-CAR volunteer committees nationwide and through their local promotion of the event, the more support can be raised for collision schools. As collision instructors and students need the industry’s support now more than ever, we didn’t want the fact that in-person fundraisers not being possible to stop us from coming together for the future professionals of the industry.” Advertisement Tom Wolf, CREF board of trustees chair and PPG Automotive Refinish director of business development noted, “PPG is proud to continue supporting CREF’s efforts to help collision programs, students, and instructors and this is a creative way to get not only the industry, but general public supporting their local schools. While we are limited on the number of golfers that attend our annual CREF summer golf fundraiser, this virtual event allows for thousands to participate, knowing that their registration fee will be reinvested back into their local schools.” Registration is now open online. Industry members not located near one of the participating I-CAR Volunteer Committees can select “CREF General Fund” when registering and their registration fee will help CREF collision school programs, instructors and students nationwide. Registrants can download the free TopGolf online game to their phone, tablet, or desktop and start practicing their virtual golf swing prior to the Nov. 20 tee-off, when registered players will be given instructions on how to access the private in-game tournament. Questions regarding the fundraiser can be directed to CREF director of development  Brandon Eckenrode.last_img read more

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Intellectual Property

first_imgMedia and entertainment – Information technology – European Union R (on the application of (1) British Telecommunications Plc (2) Talktalk Telecom Group Plc) (Claimants) v Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (Defendant) and BPI (British Recorded Music Industry) Ltd and Nine Ors (Interested Parties) and (1) Open Rights Group (2) Article 19 and Consumer Focus (Interveners): QBD (Admin) (Mr Justice Parker): 20 April 2011 The claimant internet service providers (B) applied for judicial review of the online infringement of copyright provisions (the ‘contested provisions’) in the Digital Economy Act 2010. They also challenged the draft Copyright (Initial Obligations) (Sharing of Costs) Order 2011, which proposed to make service providers liable for 25% of the costs incurred by Ofcom in carrying out functions under the contested provisions. The 2010 act was designed to tackle unlawful file sharing. Under the contested provisions, B were obliged to send warning letters to those subscribers identified as unlawfully sharing copyright material and to compile a list of such subscribers. However, the industry code which brought those obligations into legal effect had not yet been introduced. It was B’s case that the contested provisions were incompatible with EU law. B submitted that the provisions: (1) constituted a technical regulation and/or rule on services within the meaning of Directive 98/34 and therefore should have been notified to the commission in draft; (2) were incompatible with articles 3(2), 12 and 15 of Directive 2000/31; (3) were incompatible with certain provisions of Directive 95/46 and Directive 2002/58; (4) were disproportionate in their impact on internet service providers, consumers, business subscribers and public intermediaries; (5) infringed Directive 2002/20. Held: (1) Notification allowed the commission and other member states to propose amendments that might remove or reduce any restrictions which a rule on services might create on the free movement of services or the freedom of establishment (see paragraph 60 of the judgment). However, the obligations were not yet legally enforceable against any individual and therefore did not have the ‘legal effect’ described in case law, Commission of the European Communities v Germany (C-317/92) (1994) ECR I-2039 ECJ, CIA Security International SA v Signalson SA (C194/94) (1996) All ER (EC) 557 ECJ and Sapod Audic v Eco-Emballages SA (C159/00) (2002) ECR I-5031 ECJ (5th Chamber) considered (paragraphs 64-78). It was the code that in strict legal terms would constitute the technical regulation and it was its enactment that would give legal life to the initial obligations (paragraphs 84-85, 88). (2) The provisions did not breach article 12 of Directive 2000/31 (paragraphs 99-108). Nor did they require service providers to ‘monitor’ the information they transmitted, in breach of article 15(1) (paragraph 110). Furthermore, the provisions did not fall ‘within the coordinated field’ for the purposes of article 3(2); article 3(3) and the Annex removed ‘copyright’ from the scope of article 3(1) and therefore the UK remained free to impose those provisions on internet service providers, established elsewhere in the EU, supplying the relevant services in the UK (paragraphs 119-131). (3) Under article 8(2) of Directive 95/46, processing would be necessary for the ‘establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims’. That was the precise purpose of the contested provisions: the copyright owner would be able to establish not only that there had been an infringement, but also who was responsible (paragraph 159). The fact that a copyright owner might not decide to pursue legal proceedings did not mean that the action he took under the act was not for the purposes of establishing or exercising such a claim (paragraph 160). Furthermore, if there was any doubt about the application of article 8(2)(e) to the relevant processing, the UK could, before the code came into legal effect, lay down an exemption under article 8(4), based upon a ‘substantial public interest’, namely, the better protection of the rights of copyright owners (paragraph 162). In relation to Directive 2002/58, the data processed was ‘traffic data’ for the purposes of article 2. However, it was indisputable that the contested provisions were intended to promote the protection of the right to property, namely copyright, and therefore fell within the derogation under article 15(1), as interpreted by the European Court of Justice in Productores de Musica de Espana (Promusicae) v Telefonica de Espana SAU (C-275/06) (2008) All ER (EC) 809 ECJ (Grand Chamber), Productores considered (paragraphs 163-166). (4) The contested provisions promoted the aim of judicial protection of copyright, and from the point of view of both copyright owner and subscriber, the act represented a more efficient, focused and fair system than the current arrangements (paragraphs 221, 228). There were good reasons for the court to attach substantial weight to the balance struck by parliament (paragraphs 210-212, 218). The fact that less than 40% of online copyright infringement was due to file sharing did not undermine the appropriateness of the contested provisions (paragraphs 230, 234). Furthermore, it was premature to conclude that any potential ‘chilling effect’, arising where the subscriber was not necessarily the copyright infringer, was likely to be such that the social costs of such measures plainly exceeded the likely benefits. Parliament had proceeded on the basis that existing procedures were inadequate and that legislative measures had to be specifically directed to, first, educating and, second, inhibiting unlawful copyright infringement at the level where it was occurring, namely through individuals. There was nothing disproportionate in that position. It could not be concluded from the evidence that the scale of the likely costs that would arise from the contested provisions would render disproportionate legislation aimed at substantially strengthening the protection of copyright material against unlawful file sharing (paragraphs 240-241, 262). (5) The contested provisions did not breach Directive 2002/20 (paragraphs 175-183). However, the draft cost order breached article 12 of the directive: charges to recover ‘qualifying costs’ from internet service providers would ordinarily be regarded as ‘administrative charges’ and would, in principle, appear to be administrative charges under article 12 (paragraph 195). Application granted in part. center_img Anthony White QC, Kieron Beal (instructed by in-house solicitors) for the claimants; James Eadie QC, Robert Palmer, Alan Bates (instructed by Treasury solicitor) for the defendant; Pushpinder Saini QC, James Strachan (instructed by Wiggin) for the interested parties.last_img read more

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We must balance noise and overheating in urban housing

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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OHT in big barge move

first_imgThe barges weighed around 518 tonnes each, with lengths of 70 m and heights of 8.95 m.OHT explained that the barges were loaded two at a time by crane onto the vessel and stacked in a unique two-layer arrangement. On arrival in Nigeria, the first layer of barges will be floated off the vessel, followed by the second layer.   www.oht.nolast_img

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Second launch for UECC

first_imgHLPFI reported on April 25 that the first of the two ships – Auto Eco – had been launched by the Chinese yard.The vessels, which were ordered in 2014, are 181 m long with a 30 m beam and Finnish/Swedish ice class 1A certification. Each ship is capable of carrying approximately 3,800 cars, with 6,000 sq m of space for high and heavy cargoes.Cargo can be loaded on ten separate decks, with a maximum load weight of 160 tonnes. The ships are able to run on LNG, heavy fuel oil and marine gas oil.Auto Energy will now undergo sea and gas trials, and is scheduled for delivery to UECC in November 2016.www.uecc.comlast_img read more

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Top-100 law firm Howard Kennedy and Finers Stephens Innocent to merge

first_imgUK top-100 law firm Howard Kennedy and Finers Stephens Innocent LLP (FSI) have agreed a deal to merge later this year. The London firms announced they have signed heads of agreement with a view to merging under the name of Howard Kennedy FSI by 1 November 2012. The move follows talks that began in February and will create a firm with 351 staff, including 87 partners and 125 fee-earners, with a turnover of £43m. Howard Kennedy FSI will be headed by chief executive Mark Dembovsky, who joined Howard Kennedy in January 2011. FSI’s current managing partner, Paul Millett, will join the combined firm’s management committee. The firm will continue to operate from the three current offices of the two firms while it looks to find new premises that will accommodate them all after the present leases expire. The firms have come together in a bid to become the pre-eminent legal advisers to entrepreneurs, wealthy individuals and families and their businesses and funders. FSI’s Millett said: ‘Our practices, people and client base are perfectly aligned, and we share a common vision as to how this combination differentiates us from the rest of the legal market.’ Howard Kennedy’s Mark Dembovsky added: ‘This merger will create a strong platform from which to meet the dynamic needs of our entrepreneurial client base, the critical mass from which to deliver the highest-quality services commensurate with a modern day top-100 law firm.’last_img read more

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Liberia’s President Weah makes his first appointments

first_imgBarely 24 hours after taking oath of office as new leader of Liberia, President George Weah hit the ground running by making his first appointments, the Premium Times reports.In his first batch of appointees, he named seven individuals including former Senate Pro-Tempore Gbezohngar Findley, who has been named Minister of Foreign Affairs.Findley is said to be a close ally of former President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf who was a staunch supporter of former Vice President Joseph Boakai of Unity Party (UP) at the initial stage of the campaign period. Findley reportedly dumped Bokai, fueling speculations that Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf had thrown her support behind President Weah.Daniel Ziankahn, a major general, was immediately retired as the Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) and appointed the Minister of National Defence, replacing Brownie Samukai at the defence ministry. His appointment is subject to Senate confirmation.Prince Johnson, a brigadier general, takes over from Mr. Ziankahn as the new Chief of Staff of the AFL.Chairman of the now ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC), Nathaniel McGill has now been named the Minister of State for Presidential Affairs.Samuel Tweh, a long-time member of the CDC, who until his appointment was an economic consultant at the Millennium Challenge Corporation under the Ministry of Finance, is to serve as Minister of Finance and Development Planning.The president appointed Charles Gibson as Minister of Justice, and Sam Mannah as Press Secretary with immediate effect.The President has directed the heads of other government ministries and agencies remain in place until further notice.In his first speech as president Mr. Weah renewed his promise to tackle endemic corruption especially in the public service while vowing to prosecute corrupt government officials “to the full extent of the law’’.“As officials of government, it is time to put the interest of our people above our own selfish interests. It is time to be honest with our people“For those who do not refrain from enriching themselves at the expense of the people, the law will take its course,’’ he said.last_img read more

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Tanzania Spokesperson: New Political Parties law to Enhance Political Governance, Party…

first_img75 political parties register to contest 2018 polls in Zimbabwe South Africa’s Political Parties Jostle for Votes Liberia president rejects her expulsion from political partycenter_img Tanzania’s parliament has passed amendments to legislation that the government says are meant to enhance the democratic operation of political parties in the East African country.The amendments “give administrative mandates to the Political Parties Registrar to oversee democracy, rule of law and accountability within the parties.”The government says the amendments are mainly meant to ensure openness in party affairs.In an exclusive interview with CGTN, Chief government spokesperson Dr. Hassan Abbasi said “The new amendments will see transparency in party internal elections, financial reporting and property registry.”Responding to opposition allegations that the amendments could  turn Tanzania into “a de facto one-party state”,  the spokesperson clarified “His powers are not sweeping because first there is a legal guide on what he can and cannot do in respect of party governance and finally his decisions, according to Tanzanian laws, are subject to court scrutiny through judicial review, so any aggrieved party can appeal to the court.”Tanzania has long been regarded as one of Africa’s most stable democracies.The spokesperson in his statement said “Tanzania will continue to enhance its democracy and political governance to remain the peaceful land and most investor friendly country.”Relatedlast_img read more

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Dominica Among First Two for G20 Debt Relief Deal

first_imgThe Paris Club, an informal group of government creditors, said in a statement that its members would continue to coordinate closely with other concerned parties, especially when the time comes to consider extending the suspension. 1183 Views   no discussions Share (Reuters)  The Paris Club of creditor nations have accepted suspending debt service payments from Mali and the Caribbean island of Dominica until the end of the year as part of a G20 debt relief deal, the group said on Monday. Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Tweet BusinessInternationalLocalNewsPolitics Dominica Among First Two for G20 Debt Relief Deal by: – May 19, 2020 Share The two countries thus become the first two to benefit from the deal after the Group of 20 countries and Paris Club agreed to freeze the debt payments of the 77 poorest countries from May 1 through to the end of the year to free up cash for the fight against the pandemic.last_img read more

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Farmington Schools officials to interview superintendent finalists

first_imgFinalists for the position of Farmington Public Schools superintendent will tour the district on Wednesday, May 29, before a second round of interviews that evening.Trustees will talk with Dr. Robert Herrera, CEO of Benton Harbor Area Schools, at 6:30 p.m., and Dr. Sarena Shivers, superintendent of Redford Union Schools, at 8:15 p.m.While officials will deliberate following the interviews, the selection process includes a second date in June if they are unable to reach consensus.Herrera was recruited by the Michigan Department of Education’s School Reform Office to lead turnaround efforts in Benton Harbor. He has also served as superintendent in South Haven Public Schools and Onsted Community Schools, and as assistant superintendent at Lenawee Intermediate School District and Adrian Public Schools. During his roughly 25 years in public education, he has also been a principal, teacher, coach, and classroom advisor.Shivers holds a doctorate degree from Indiana University and has nearly two decades of school administration experience, including five as Assistant Superintendent of Achievement for Washtenaw Intermediate School District and three as Director of Curriculum Instruction and Assessment for Southfield Public Schools. She has six years of teaching experience in Baltimore City, the United Kingdom, and Indiana.The interviews will be held at the Schulman Administrative Center, 32500 Shiawassee in Farmington, broadcast live on TV-10, and live-streamed at https://farmington.vod.castus.tv/vod.  Reported by Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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University of West Florida 2018 Fall Youth Clinic

first_img2018 Fall Youth Clinic RegistrationPENSACOLA, Fla.- The University of West Florida volleyball team is going to have their 2018 youth clinic to learn all the fundamentals of volleyball. The clinic will be this Sunday, December 9th from 5:00- 7:30 pm in the UWF Field House.The UWF volleyball team and staff will be coaching skills such as setting, hitting, passing, and serving. This is for ages in grades 4th – 8th. With 10 players and 3 coaches, the coaches to player ratio allows great opportunities for one-on-one training.The West Florida volleyball team finished their season nationally ranked at No. 24 and with much to be excited about. The Argos finished with a record of 25-8 overall and 15-1 in the Gulf South Conference. In postseason, the Argos hosted the GSC tournament where they won against West Alabama in five competitive sets.UWF won their eighth GSC tournament championship. Mackenzie Chrisman, Nadine Williams and Makila York all received All-Tournament team honors.The Argos went onto the NCAA Regionals hosted by Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, FL. The ladies faced Florida Southern where the season came to an end in four hard fought sets. Caleigh Morrison received All-Tournament team honors.In the postseason awards, Mackenzie Chrisman earned D2CCA All-South Region first team and Jordyn Poppen earned D2CCA All-South Region second team. For the AVCA, Jordyn Poppen received Division II All-South Region team Nadine Williams earned Division II All-South Region Honorable Mention. Finally, Jordyn Poppen was named an AVCA All-American. Poppen earned honorable mention AVCA All-American honors.The 2018 Fall Youth Clinic is a great opportunity full of learning, fun, and volleyball. The UWF volleyball team is full of wonderful young women who have a passion for the sport and are excited to teach what they know.To register now and hold a spot please click here: 2018 Fall Youth Clinic Registration.The clinic is 50 dollars a participant and walk ups are welcome, but pre-registration is strongly encouraged. Checks can be made out to ACE Volleyball.For more information contact Patricia Gandolfo at acevolleyballcamp@gmail.com, or visit acevolleyballcamps.com.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Leroy Sane: Germany midfielder close to joining Man City in £37m deal

first_imgLeroy Sane is close to completing a move to Manchester City from Schalke for a fee of £37m plus add-ons.The Bundesliga club announced on Monday that the midfielder was in Manchester and had not joined their pre-season training camp in Austria.City manager Pep Guardiola confirmed on 21 July he wanted to sign Sane.The 20-year-old helped Germany reach the semi-finals at Euro 2016, having made his international debut in November.He told Schalke sporting director Christian Heidel earlier this summer that he wanted to leave the clubSane, a product of the youth system at Schalke, made his senior debut for them in April 2014.He scored eight goals in 33 Bundesliga appearances last season as Schalke finished fifth, missing out on Champions League qualification for the second year in a rowlast_img read more

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Don’t miss out on derby day – tickets going fast!

first_imgBristol Bears play Bath in the Premiership’s curtain raiser clash on Friday, August 31st (7.45pm KO) and tickets are available to purchase online now by clicking here and Ashton Gate is close to a sell-out.This is a gold category fixture, with Forever Bristol members receiving the best possible price – a £5 discount on general sale rates and 2% Rewards cash for every home league ticket purchased.To find out more and to purchase a £20 Forever Bristol membership*, click here.The best way to guarantee your seat for what promises to be a fascinating season is by purchasing a season card for 2018/19 by clicking here.*Price does not include £1 postage and £1 booking fee.last_img read more