iqhrngmx

In 2019, video game projects on Kickstarter held steady

first_imgIn 2019, video game projects on Kickstarter held steadyIco Partners: Though tabletop drove segment’s rise, video games saw only minute growth in funded projects, money raised Rebekah ValentineSenior Staff WriterWednesday 15th January 2020Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleICO PartnersThe “games” category on Kickstarter once again saw significant year-over-year growth in 2019, but it wasn’t thanks to video games.Rather, it’s tabletop that’s continued to lead the games category charge according to Ico Partners analyst Thomas Bidaux in his annual blog post on gaming on Kickstarter. Per his analysis, across the games category, the number of funded projects continued to grow in 2019 faster than the number of submitted projects. That means the percentage of projects that got funded last year went up once again.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games But in video games specifically, only 28 more projects were funded in 2019 compared to 2018, and only $425,000 more was raised year over year. In fact, 2019 resembled 2018 in just about every way.In total, 2019 saw 1,428 submitted projects, and 380 projects funded. Six of those funded projects (one more than in 2018) brought in over $500,000. These were Subverse, Monster Prom 2: Holiday Season, R-Type Final 2, Day of Dragons, and Everspace 2.182 funded projects in 2019 brought in less than $10,000.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesRatio of successful Kickstarter projects at highest since Double Fine AdventureICO Partners breaks down ongoing maturation of crowdfunding projects with H1 2019 updateBy James Batchelor A year agoIco Partners: Video games see fewer crowdfunded projects, steady amount funded in 2018Trends indicates Kickstarter is stabilizing, with a higher percentage of quality projects as platform maturesBy Rebekah Valentine 2 years agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

iqhrngmx

Hoboken Councilwoman Fisher elected new Democratic committee chair

first_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter By John Heinis – June 13, 2017 2:48 pm 0 Bayonne Community Previous articleInnocent WNY man involved in fiery Jersey City crash seeking public’s helpNext articleFulop announces Jersey City dropping lawsuit against Friends of Loews John Heinis FBW says Prime Cycle’s new location violates state guidelines for Hoboken waterfront RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ElectionsHoboken TAGSannette chaparroanthony romanoDawn Zimmerhoboken democratic committeetiffanie fisher SHARE Hoboken Councilwoman Fisher elected new Democratic committee chair CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Facebook Twitter Hoboken 2nd Ward Councilwoman Tiffanie Fisher was elected the city’s new Democratic committee chair, with Mayor Dawn Zimmer, her chief of staff Vijay Chaudhuri and Assemblywoman Annette Chaparro (D-33) being named honorary chairs of the HDC. [fve]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pyuq78LThFQ&feature=youtu.be[/fve]Fisher, who was elected to the city council in November 2015, succeeds Freeholder Anthony Romano (D-5), who was elected as committee chair at a chaotic meeting two years ago.Zimmer backed 67 candidates for 80 seats in last week’s primary election and came away with a whopping 63 seats.Worth noting is that these committee members ran on the Hudson County Democratic Organization line with gubernatorial hopeful Phil Murphy, state Senator Brian Stack (D-33), also the Union City mayor), Chaparro and Romano.This roughly hour-long meeting was much more tame with few surprises or controversial moments as the HDC elected their executive board.“According to our bylaws, which everyone should have a copy of by now, we have an opportunity to have an executive committee of six people or eight people. I think eight people is better because I’m a big believer because more voices are better,” she said at the Hoboken Bar and Grill last night.Phil Cohen, Nora Martinez DeBenedetto and Mitch Fagen will serve as the 1st, 2nd and 3rd vice chairs, respectively, while Paul Kuehn was selected as treasurer and Kurt Gardiner takes over as sergeant-at-arms.Rounding out the eight-person executive board is Rachel Hodes as recording secretary and LaTrenda Ross (who was not present) as corresponding secretary.The only mildly tense exchange of the meeting came when Ines Garcia-Keim, a former vice chair of the HDC, opposed Chaudhuri being named as an honorary chair since he is not a committee member or local elected official.“I have a point of order that I’d like to air: honorary members, in article 1, section 4 honorary members. It says the following elected, Democratic members of the City of Hoboken shall be honorary members of the committee with all the rights of membership, accepting the right to vote, unless otherwise provided by the committee’s bylaws,” she began.“The Democratic, national and state Hudson County committee could be women, chairpersons of all standing, as defined in the article [being read] and all Democratic elected officials in Hudson County,” claiming that Chaudhuri did not fit the criteria.Fisher expectedly disagreed with Garcia-Keim’s interpretation of the bylaws.“The bylaws are clear,” Garcia-Keim said.“No, the bylaws [you cited] are different than an honorary chair. An honorary member is just people who can go to the meetings, period. That just says your an honorary member, you’re just non-voting. Those are the kind of people that are allowed to enter,” responded Fisher.“There isn’t anything explicit anything explicit about who can be named an honorary chair.”Garcia-Keim said she planned on reading up on the honorary chair appointment process further and Fisher stated she would be happy to revisit the matter at a later date.Speaking with Hudson County View after the meeting concluded, Fisher recalled her experiences with the committee, or lack thereof, before listing some key goals she hopes to accomplish.“Everyone has come together for a different reason. Some people are really focused locally on honest elections and doing what we can to minimize of eliminate voter fraud that happens in Hoboken and there’s some other people that are really just gunning and focused on the mid-term elections,” she explained.“As we look across the state and see a number of Republican seats maybe are at risk, what can we do as a committee to help go out and elect a Democrat in those seats.” Bayonne DeGise: Hudson County ‘determined’ to get out of ICE contract following Essex decisionlast_img read more

iqhrngmx

Para-Dressage Classification Hub Coming to Ottawa in May

first_imgEquestrian Canada (EC) is pleased to announce that a Para-Equestrian Classification Hub will be hosted in Ottawa, ON from May 17-20, 2018 in conjunction with the Ottawa Dressage Festival.What: Para-Equestrian Classification HubWhen: May 17-20, 2018Where: Ottawa Dressage Festival at Wesley Clover Parks – 401 Corkstown Rd., Nepean, ON, K2H 8G2Cost: $150Registration Deadline: May 1, 2018Classification is available to athletes who are actively competing at the EC Bronze level and are ready to progress to Silver and Gold. Athletes must have a recognized medical condition resulting in an impairment that can be measured objectively.Please note, not all athletes who have an impairment are eligible for classification. For example, a symptom such as lax ligaments, general pain, or an impairment that changes from day-to-day is not classifiable. In addition, riders must have more than a 15% loss of power, range or coordination in any limb or the trunk to be eligible for classification.Athletes are responsible for their own travel costs, and must bring one person with them into the classification session. It is strongly recommended that they bring their coach if they are available, so any compensating aids can be discussed with the classifier.Those interested in participating in the Classification Hub are encouraged to request a classification package. The package must be completed by the athlete, as well as their coach and medical doctor, and returned to EC no later than May 1, 2018. To request a package, contact:Jamie-Ann GoodfellowCoordinator, Para-Dressage1-866-282-8395 x [email protected] Classification Advisory Group will review the documentation and the athlete will be notified if they are eligible for classification.The next opportunity for athletes to receive classification in Ontario will be in the fall of 2018.For more information on para-equestrian classification, visit www.equestrian.ca/sport/para-equestrian/programs. Tags: Para-Equestrian Classification Hub, SIGN UP We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. Horse Sport Enews Email* Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition!last_img read more

iqhrngmx

Cologne to stay home of EHF CL Final4 until 2024

first_imgRecommended for you Related Items:Cologne, lanxess arena Click to comment Mamdouh Ashem Shebib believes in Montpellier at Final4: This team has winning mentality VELUX EHF CL FINAL4: Veszprem VS Kiel again! ShareTweetShareShareEmail ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsCologne has once again confirmed its status as the home of top-class international club handball.In a new deal signed by the European Handball Federation and EHF Marketing GmbH, organiser of the VELUX EHF FINAL4, with the City of Cologne, LANXESS arena and federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia it has been confirmed that the event will return for a further four events, starting in the 2020/21 season.Established in 2010, the VELUX EHF FINAL4 has developed to become the biggest and most successful indoor sports event on the indoor sports market. The current contract with Cologne runs through to the 2020 event.Its unique blend of top-class sports action and spectacular entertainment has made the two-day mega event a must-see meeting place for everybody connected to the sport.This season the event will also celebrate a major milestone with the tenth edition to be played on 1/2 June 2019.From the start of the 2020/21 season, the EHF and EHF Marketing will begin a new partnership with Infront and DAZN, which is set to transform the sport.And, as the federation’s flagship club event, the FINAL4 will continue to serve as the sport’s showcase event and culmination of the European club season.Source: EHF CONFUSION IN COLOGNE: Lanxess Arena mistake rearranges Germany-Denmark clash Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

iqhrngmx

In Aleppo, I saw why Assad is winning

first_imgOur Syrian hosts told us that the two dozen soldiers and another five or so plain clothes intelligence officers who accompanied us everywhere were necessary to protect us from the mortars rebels fire indiscriminately at civilian areas. But the Iranian and Russian journalists I saw close to the front lines did not merit the same VIP escort. Later, when I told one of my minders at the hotel that I wanted to go across the street to buy water at a kiosk, he demurred, urging me to return to my room. Minutes later, a hotel staffer brought me a frosty bottle. I was not sure whether to feel like a king in his castle or a prisoner in his dungeon.* * *The medieval stalls of the Old City where Venetian traders established the first European consulate in 1548 have been reduced to charred stone. Minarets still stand, but their pockmarked bricks tell the story of the quarter’s suffering. “We only used light weapons because to use heavy ones here would destroy our national treasures,” Colonel Abd al-Majid told me. There’s little evidence of such restraint. Outside observers have blamed both sides for the destruction that has obliterated pre-modern travelers’ inns, religious seminaries and mausoleums.Nearby lay the remains of the Carlton Hotel housed in a 19th century building. The rebels destroyed it in May 2014, tunneling several miles to plant underground explosives. An estimated 30 to 50 government forces were killed. The day before our visit to the Old City, Presbyterian Reverend Ibrahim Nseir told us how the rebels destroyed his church in 2012 using the same kind of munitions. Such tunnel bombs have proved to be one of the rebels’ most effective weapons in an asymmetrical war in which they face daily air bombardments.As I came out of the Suq al-Zarb near the Citadel, I glimpsed a stocky man with light skin and ruddy cheeks leaving a battle front area escorted by six Syrian soldiers. His gold necklace hinted that he was a foreigner. When one of our hosts told his retinue, “Get him out of here!” I understood he was a Russian. Another Russian in our group caught up with him, learning that he was from a base in the province of Samara on the Volga river. The soldier was likely from the city of Tolyatti which houses the 3rd Guards Special Forces Brigade, a contingent that has fought in Chechnya and Ukraine and is counted among Russia’s elite forces. Moscow has repeatedly denied that its ground forces are fighting the rebels and instead argued that they are only battling the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). But the soldier’s presence in Aleppo confirmed that Russia is willing to exhaust all its resources to prop up Assad.An eclectic group of foreigners are certainly keeping Assad in power even as he remonstrates against the foreign jihadists destroying his country. But Assad refuses to acknowledge the contribution they have made to keep him in power. Ten-year-old Muhammad Nur came four months ago from Bab al-Nayrab, an impoverished neighborhood filled with shoulder high garbage for a mile the last time I visited in 2012. “I stayed in the house because I was afraid of mortars and artillery,” he said, explaining why he didn’t play in the street. “I was happy when I came here because the army protects us.”With the heavy intelligence and military contingent meandering around the complex, it was difficult to ascertain where pre-rehearsed pro-government slogans ended and real sentiments began. Most regurgitated the government line that the rebels came from abroad and were backed by Qatar and Saudi Arabia. But their denunciations of the rebels were noteworthy if only because they are from the same destitute classes. The IDPs living in cramped wooden containers were not the wealthy business moguls with their polished English and European cut clothes who dined with us in posh establishments. The IDPs’ support of the government merely illustrates how maladroit the insurgents are and why their backers in the West were so woefully wrong in urging another intervention in the Muslim world.Our hosts did not have to do much to illustrate this. They merely took us to the al-Razi hospital to show us the rebels’ handiwork. An ambulance brought in a soldier whose bland camouflage uniform was covered in dark red around his left ankle. A trickle of others brought in more soldiers, casualties of a rebel offensive in Halab al-Jadida, replete with two suicide bombers and a barrage of mortars. But soon civilians inundated the hospital as well.One was Hazim Sharif, a 26-year-old doctor with a coin-sized hole full of shrapnel in the chest. When he was initially rushed to the emergency room, he was barely conscious, his eyes glazed over. His mother wailed, “Please do not cry for my son. Pray for the Messenger.” When I next saw him behind the hospital, he was covered with a blue cloth in the back of an ambulance. The EMS technician lifted the covering. His eyes were closed. On an elevated curb adjacent to a hospital entrance, a woman was grieving the loss of her husband. Inside was a makeshift morgue and seven bodies of those who died in the attack. Taxis and civilian cars periodically appeared to ferret away the dead. “These are the moderate rebels the media talks about,” al-Shehabi lectured me. “They don’t distinguish between soldiers and civilians. They want to kill us all.”We waited for several hours, but just like at Bustan al-Qasr, no one dared venture out of east Aleppo.The next day we were taken to humanitarian crossings, frontline posts the government has opened to allow rebels and civilians to leave besieged east Aleppo. At the Bustan al-Qasr crossing, a canal and piles of rusted car chassis divided the two sides. A captain told us the crossing was first opened five months ago. Twelve civilians had crossed to the government side for medical care before they returned. Two fighters did as well. But on the day of our visit, the streets were empty. The industrial sector of Layramun in northwest Aleppo tells the story of this war. Its 1,200 factories have been looted and destroyed. In their place are piles of concrete rubble filled with rusted metal. Collapsed water tanks peak through the ruins. Where bustling factories and the din of machines once churned out bundles of yarn, only the occasional explosion of distant artillery can be heard. In the weeks since I visited the besieged city in early November, the Syrian military along with its foreign backers and proxies have staged a massive offensive that is imminently close to retaking the eastern half of Aleppo held by rebels for more than four years. Relentless air strikes have driven some 20,000 civilians to flee the ravaged industrial city, Syria’s second largest.“Sixty percent of the companies here were textiles, like sewing. But we also had companies which made plastic and steel moldings,” explained Ziyad Berri, an owner of a pharmaceutical company located in rebel territory.Berri was one of a handful of industrialists and public figures who accompanied me and a dozen American and British journalists during our four-day trip inside a city that has dominated headlines for months but which few Western reporters have seen. What we saw, along with the devastation wrought by years of civil war, was evidence of how the Assad regime has maintained control over its most prosperous areas and why the rebels failed at capturing not only the city but the entire country. Though he waged an unpitying counterinsurgency campaign that has contributed to the deaths of 430,000, displaced half of his country’s population and leveled vast swaths of Syria’s major cities, President Bashar al-Assad managed to maintain the allegiance of a good portion of his citizens by offering them a thin veneer of normalcy. It is Assad’s people who are losing the war.When I met with Assad days earlier, he posited, “Let’s suppose that these allegations are correct, and this president was killing his own people and committed crimes…after five years and a half, who supported me?” From my brief visit to Aleppo, it was clear that it was not Syria’s silent majority.On the journey to the city, I saw a Hezbollah funeral procession outside Homs. In Aleppo, Kurdish fighters from the People’s Protection Units held positions in Bani Zayd, a neighborhood which houses no Kurds. Iranian backed Shi’i militias actively post their exploits on social media. And though the skies were quiet during my visit, Russian fighter jets have been pummeling rebel held areas of east Aleppo for months. Assad is winning this war because his backers have zealously embraced the use of overwhelming force while his adversaries, and their supporters, have not.But it is Assad’s people who are losing the war. Nearly 11 million Syrians have either fled the country or are internally displaced according to the United Nations. With a pre-war population of 21 million, that means about half have left their homes. In February, the Syrian Centre for Policy Research estimated that 11.5 percent of the population had been killed or injured through 2015.Dead bodies lined-up on the ground following air strikes by the Syrian government | Abd Doumany/AFP via Getty ImagesThe government has survived a failed revolution because it provides what the rebels can never do—a consistent wage and the promise of a modicum of governance. The regime deftly understood early on that it was necessary to preserve the façade of normalcy. The fate of Libyan leader Mu’amar al-Qadhafi provides a stark contrast. After Qadhafi lost the eastern half of his country in a matter of weeks in 2011, he severed rebel held areas from regime-held territory. He cut off the mobile telephone networks. He ceased providing government services there. Qadhafi was under attack and he ensured that all Libyans knew this.But Assad drew from a different playbook. He continued paying government salaries to civil servants in rebel territory. Utilities such as electricity and water were only cut off in the most besieged of territories. And the government tried its hardest to make residents forget a war was raging outside their cities. Assad has certainly starved out his enemies (food shortages have been a way of life in places like Aleppo for years and shipments of emergency rations have even been intercepted in rebel enclaves such as Daraya outside of Damascus) in ways reminiscent of World War II. But Assad has justified it to his supporters and fence sitters as a necessary move to stomp out the foreign jihadists threatening their existence. While his critics in the West scoff at such claims they resonate among a population that looks around the Middle East and only sees chaos when governments are toppled in the name of freedom and democracy.This explains why even some of the poorest, most beleaguered Syrians have not forsaken their leader and instead rail at the rebels, who claim to want to liberate them from a despot. At the Hafiz al-Assad mosque, internally displaced persons (IDPs) from rebel held east Aleppo were eager to tell us how wicked the fighters there are. “Bashar pays our monthly wages and utilities,” 72-year-old Salah Yassin said, struggling to enunciate words between his missing teeth. “The terrorists took our money and didn’t give us any food.”center_img For others, such as Aleppo’s industrialists, Assad bet smartly on the knowledge that most of their fortunes s are tied to his survival and prosperity. Some of them made their money from their contacts with the all-powerful intelligence services that control the country and well-placed civil servants who can navigate the complex bureaucracy. Others were cognizant that a revolution is never kind to the wealthy. When the Ba’ath took power in 1963, it nationalized factories and banks and imposed land reforms that severely restricted private holdings. Overnight, fortunes extending back centuries were wiped out.Syrian men carrying babies make their way through the rubble of destroyed buildings in Aleppo | Ameer Alhalbi/AFP via Getty ImagesIt was not only the businessmen’s wealth the rebels threatened, but their lifestyles as well. The Syrian rebellion in Aleppo was launched by the rural classes. They “came from Idlib and rural Aleppo,” parliamentarian Zayna Khawla told me, speaking in a contemptuous tone, as if the rebels were the Beverly Hillbillies descending on Rodeo Drive. “They are not like us,” industrialist Raf’at Shammeh explained. “Their values are different. We want to protect our country. They want to destroy it.”“This is commercial terrorism,” our host Fares al-Shehabi noted. His position as Chairman of the Chamber of Industry gave him an aura of gravitas. But in Syria, where titles and positions mean nothing, it is proximity to the halls of power that matter. Shehabi’s real influence derives from his late uncle who was the military chief of staff for 24 years. Shehabi showed us sacks filled with a substance he claimed was yellow sulfur used to make mortars. It was impossible to tell. The Chinese produced sacks were labeled dicalcium phosphate and titanium dioxide, two non-flammable substances.What was certain was that the narrative our government hosts spun us was only partially true. The rebels undoubtedly looted Layramun’s factories, stripping them of everything that could be moved to Turkey, where industrialists have been scooping up equipment at fire-sale prices. Indeed, during a 2012 visit to Aleppo’s most modern industrial complex, Sheikh Najjar, I saw rebels carting off heavy machinery.In Syria, there are no prizes for critical thinking or dissent.But the rebels lack the artillery to pancake buildings. That is the work of the Syrian and Russian forces, who have only stepped up airstrikes since the beginning of the recent offensive. I stopped two of our military escorts, pointing to a building that had obviously been destroyed by airstrikes. I asked if government fighter jets had demolished it. One of the escorts studied the building’s collapsed floors and was about to nod his head before his comrade blurted out “gas canister bomb,” a projectile popular with the rebels. The pensive soldier abruptly froze and agreed. In Syria, there are no prizes for critical thinking or dissent. The Castello road crossing was more of a carnival affair. Buses lined dirt mounds, ready to transport civilians to less imperiled locations. The government promised to relocate fighters to nearby Idlib where their position is much stronger. A dozen Russian soldiers from the Centre for Reconciliation beamed video from their drones to Moscow for Ministry of Defense press conferences. We waited for several hours, but just like at Bustan al-Qasr, no one dared venture out of east Aleppo. Either they were comfortable dodging fighter jets strikes as they waited out the siege with no food, or as is more likely, they were too afraid of the consequences of crossing into government territory. All we saw from the east side was a mortar which landed 200 hundred feet away.The government, supported by Russian fighter jets and Iranian backed Shi’i militias, is confident it can retake east Aleppo. But it has been slow to move into the remaining besieged areas which shelter between 5,000 to 15,000 rebels according to local activists and insurgent group leaders. Whether it can deploy the forces necessary to do so remains to be seen. But what is certain is that the pain of Aleppo’s civilians will endure long after the last mortar falls. Sectarian enmity and distrust will complicate a rebuilding process that is already estimated at more than $260 billion. If Assad wins, most Western observers will attribute the triumph to his use of naked force. But it his reliance on primordial loyalties, a fear of post-revolutionary chaos and appeal to the self-interest of Aleppo’s merchant class which will have been the real keys to his success. In the end it may well look like a victory that would have been better avoided.Barak Barfi is a fellow at the New America Foundation where he specializes in Arab and Islamic affairs. Also On POLITICO France calls for UN meeting on Aleppo By Esther King EU pushes for Aleppo emergency aid plan By Laurens Ceruluslast_img read more

iqhrngmx

2 PNG journalists qualify for state UIL academic meet

first_imgPORT NECHES — After winning gold medals at the Regional University Interscholastic League Academic Meet, two Port Neches-Groves High School journalists will compete at the State Meet in Austin on May 26.Senior Laurel Brittain and sophomore Madison Hamby advanced to the highest level of state competition after placing first in Feature Writing and News Writing, respectively, at the Regional UIL Meet held at Magnolia High School on April 11.Brittain will be making her second appearance at the state level, while the trip will mark Hamby’s first time to compete at the University of Texas campus. Brittain competed in 2014 in the News Writing contest after placing first in that category at the regional level“I was so surprised when I heard that I won the Feature Writing contest at regional,” Brittain said. “Throughout the duration of the UIL season, I wasn’t on my A-game. Because I hadn’t done that great, I was extremely nervous when the regional competition started. It was a tough story to compose, but I have been practicing since the district meet, so I guess my hard work paid off.”Hamby said that she is very excited about the contest, but admits to being a little nervous.“Being one of the youngest students in the competition has definitely been intimidating,” she said, “but it has helped my confidence in my writing grow a lot.”With the two journalists qualifying, 2015 marks the ninth consecutive year that PN-G will have had a journalism student competing at the state meet.“I couldn’t be more proud of these two,” journalism adviser Janis Ryan said. “They worked very hard throughout the UIL competitive season, placing at every invitational meet and winning at district. We tied with the Nederland team for the district title this year, and were the second place team at the regional level.”The UIL News Writing Contest requires that students write a complete news story from a “prompt,” which provides a situation, quotes from people involved, and necessary additional information needed in order to complete the story. Students have 45 minutes to write their stories, which are then evaluated by a team of judges.Hamby said that she likes the challenge.“The News Writing contest takes a lot of critical thinking,” she said. “I am excited to see the topic for state because I have a feeling that it will be difficult. I try to go into every competition having fun and doing the best that I can.”In the Feature Writing competition, the contest resembles News Writing, in that students are given a prompt from which to write a story. But, that all changes at the state level. A guest speaker is brought in and students are given a fact/bio sheet on the individual. Students must ask questions in a press conference and procure their own quotes needed for the story. They then have one hour to write.Ryan said she believes that both Brittain and Hamby are up for the challenge.“There’s a lot more pressure at state for Laurel because you really have to be on your toes and get your own quotes from the press conference,” Ryan said. “My students write self-generated feature stories all the time, so it’s not that different for them. Both Laurel and Madison are great writers and I know that they will do well. They do their best work when under pressure.”Brittain said she is ready for her return trip to Austin.“This time I’m taking the competition seriously,” Brittain said. “Last year, I wasn’t as prepared as I needed to be and I wasn’t completely focused on winning. But this year, my second round, I’m giving it my all.”last_img read more

iqhrngmx

Jessie Mueller Will Star as Carole King in the New Musical Beautiful; Broadway Dates Announced

first_img Mueller received a Tony nomination for her Broadway debut in On a Clear Day You Can See Forever. She went on to star in Broadway’s The Mystery of Edwin Drood (Broadway.com Audience Choice Award nomination) and then replaced Kelli O’Hara in the Tony-nominated musical Nice Work If You Can Get It. Her additional credits include Lincoln Center’s Carousel, the Public Theater’s Into the Woods and Chicago productions of Meet Me in St. Louis, Baby and She Loves Me. Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019 Click below to get to know Jessie Mueller better in a recent episode of Show People with Paul Wontorek. Related Shows View Comments Beautiful: The Carole King Musicalcenter_img Star Files Featuring songs written by Gerry Goffin, Carole King, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil and a book by Douglas McGrath, Beautiful tells the story of King from her early days as a Brooklyn teenager (named Carol Klein) struggling to enter the record business to her years spent as a chart-topping music legend. The production will feature choreography by Josh Prince. Additionally casting and creative team members will be announced shortly. Jessie Mueller will feel like a natural woman on Broadway this fall! The Tony nominee is set to headline Beautiful-The Carole King Musical, the new bio show about the early life and career of the famous singer/songwriter. The musical will receive its world premiere at San Francisco’s SHN Curran Theatre September 24 through October 20 before transferring to the Stephen Sondheim Theatre, where it will begin previews on November 21. Beautiful officially opens on Broadway on January 12, 2014, directed by Mark Bruni. Jessie Muellerlast_img read more

iqhrngmx

Musgrove family celebrates first ‘529 Day’ baby

first_imgBrattleboro Memorial Hospital,The Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems and Vermont Student Assistance Corp marked national 529 Day by starting a college savings account for Skyra Musgrove – the first baby born May 29 at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital. Baby Skyra, who weighed in at 7 pounds, 7 ounces, was born at 12:36 am in Brattleboro, one of the participating hospitals in 529 Day event.“We are so excited to be able to partner with VSAC and the Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan to award our ‘529 Baby’ with money for their college savings,” said Jill Olson, vice president of policy and legislative affairs for the hospital association. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for a family to receive money for college.”Scott Giles, VSAC President and CEO, said that 529 Day is an effort to remind parents that now is the time to start saving. “Skyra has a foundation for her future—what a great way to celebrate her birth,” said Giles. “We hope that other families will be inspired to start saving for their children, no matter how young or old—it’s never too early or too late to save.”Also, across the state during May, families of children of any age up to 18, have had an opportunity to enter to win one of two $529 VHEIP contributions. One boy and one girl will be selected in a random drawing. Families have until midnight on May 31, 2014 to enter at www.vheip.org(link is external).Proud parents Angela Musgrove and Scott Powers hold Skyra, Vermont’s 529 Baby, born at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital May 29 at 12:36 am. About VHEIPThe VHEIP 529 college savings plan was established in 1999 and is Vermont’s only state-sponsored 529 plan. VHEIP is administered by the Vermont Student Assistance Corp. and managed by TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing Inc. For more information about VHEIP, visit www.vheip.org(link is external) or call the customer service center at (800) 637-5860.About VAHHSVAHHS is a member-owned organization devoted to improving the health status of communities throughout Vermont. Its activities include advocacy, policy development, education and research. VAHHS works in partnership with dozens of Vermont health care organizations on a wide variety of issues, providing educational and research services for members and non-members alike. VAHHS supports coordination of our members’ health care services with other health or social service organizations. For more information, visit www.vahhs.org(link is external).About VSACVermont Student Assistance Corporation is a public, nonprofit corporation created by the Vermont Legislature in 1965 to help Vermonters plan and pay for education or training beyond high school. VSAC administers Vermont’s 529 college savings plan; outreach services to encourage low-income students to aspire to and complete college; college and career planning services for all Vermonters; need-based state grants for full-time, part-time and non-degree study; public and private scholarship programs; and private education loans. Find us at www.vsac.org(link is external) or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/VermontStudentAssistanceCorporation(link is external).Brattleboro — (May 30, 2014) – BMHlast_img read more

iqhrngmx

At State of the School District address, Shawnee Mission superintendent says district must help every child reach potential

first_imgSuperintendent Mike Fulton discussed the district’s recently completed strategic plan at Thursday’s State of the School District Luncheon, which was put on by the NEJC Chamber.Highlighting demographic trends that have the Shawnee Mission area seeing growing diversity, Shawnee Mission School District Superintendent Mike Fulton on Thursday laid out a vision for updating the district’s approach to teaching to provide every student with a path to meet their potential.Before a crowd of local elected officials, municipal government staff and business leaders at the Broadmoor Bistro in the district’s Center for Academic Achievement, Fulton’s annual State of the District address, which is put on by the NEJC Chamber, focused on the recently completed strategic planning process and how Shawnee Mission plans to prepare today’s students “for a world that doesn’t exist yet.”“As you look at this plan, it basically boils down to one sentence: Every child will have a personalized learning plan that helps them to become college and career ready, and to have the interpersonal skills they need to have life success,” Fulton said. “We’re challenging people to build on the past, but also look forward with a clean sheet of paper.”Fulton noted that this approach will include efforts to close the so-called achievement gap between minority students and the student population at-large. Although the gap in Shawnee Mission is less pronounced than at the state or national level, students of color here still do not score as high on tests like the ACT as their peers on average. Fulton noted that with growing racial diversity at Shawnee Mission schools — students of color now make up approximately 36 percent of total enrollment — the imperative to close the achievement gap will grow.“Sometimes in the past we’ve educated some kids extraordinarily well, but not necessarily every child well,” Fulton said. “We can’t afford to do that any more.”He reiterated a point that’s he made frequently in the past: That exposure to a variety of backgrounds and viewpoints is a benefit to the education of Johnson County students.“It’s important that as a society — not just locally here in Shawnee Mission, but across this country — that we begin to embrace this notion that we have a lot diversity in our community and our country and that diversity absolutely is a strength,” Fulton said.last_img read more

iqhrngmx

Susskind to highlight The Florida Bar’s 65th Annual Convention

first_imgSusskind to highlight The Florida Bar’s 65th Annual Convention March 1, 2015 Regular News Susskind to highlight The Florida Bar’s 65th Annual Conventioncenter_img The ‘legal futurist’ has worked on legal technology issues for more than 30 years Legal technology and innovation will take center stage at The Florida Bar’s 65th Annual Convention June 24-27 at the Boca Raton Resort and Club.“It is not practice as usual,” said Annual Convention Chair Sean Desmond of Tallahassee.Desmond said this year’s theme, “Charting a Course for the Future,” is in keeping with President Greg Coleman’s vision for his administration — to focus on the technology that is rapidly revolutionizing the profession.“Technology itself has just absolutely exploded and the impact on the profession is amazing,” said Desmond, adding with e-filing, e-discovery, e-service, and cloud- based practice management software, it is imperative that lawyers stay abreast of the fast-paced changes taking place.“You can see in the daily practice of law how technology is totally revolutionizing the way we do business,” he said.To help Florida lawyers stay on top of the changing legal landscape, Desmond said the Bar has teamed up with Clio, one of the leaders in cloud based practice management software, to put on an all-day seminar on Wednesday, June 24. While many of the details of the Clio seminar are still being worked out, Desmond said the programming will be “second to none” in terms of providing the latest insight on law and technology issues, with a keynote address provided by “legal futurist” Richard Susskind.Susskind is an author, speaker, and independent adviser to major professional firms and to national governments. Susskind’s main area of expertise is the future of professional service and, in particular, the way in which IT and the Internet are changing the way lawyers work. He has worked on legal technology for over 30 years. He has written and edited numerous books, including Expert Systems in Law (OUP, 1987), The Future of Law (OUP, 1996), Transforming the Law (OUP, 2000), The Susskind Interviews: Legal Experts in Changing Times (Sweet & Maxwell, 2005 ), The End of Lawyers? Rethinking the Nature of Legal Services (OUP, 2008), Tomorrow’s Lawyers (2013), and has written around 150 columns for The Times. His work has been translated into 10 languages.In his latest book, Susskind claims that legal institutions and lawyers are poised to change more radically over the next two decades than they have over the last two centuries. The future of legal service, he says, will be neither Grisham nor Rumpole. Instead, it will be a world of virtual courts, Internet-based global legal businesses, online document production, commoditized service, legal process outsourcing, and web-based simulated practice. Legal markets will be liberalized, with new jobs, and new employers, for lawyers . Tomorrow’s Lawyers is a guide to this future — for young and aspiring lawyers, and for all who want to modernize our legal and justice systems. It navigates the new legal terrain and offers practical guidance for those who intend to build careers and businesses in law.Past Clio seminars have touched on practicing in the post-information age; technology trends for law firms; virtual communication and collaboration; the paperless firm; digital marketing for law firms; entrepreneurship in law; and content marketing for lawyers, among others. Desmond said the Bar’s Annual Convention always provides the ultimate environment to network with colleagues and friends and the Clio seminar will also include a luncheon and reception.Members, he said, should also take advantage of other CLE seminars being offered this year, including:* “Don’t Crash on the Information Highway: What Every Lawyer Needs To Know About The Impact of Technology on Employment Law Issues,” presented as a Presidential Showcase Seminar by the Labor and Employment Law Section.* “Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence,” presented by the Business Law Section.* “Making a Big Impact in Consumer Protection: Analyzing Consumer Impact Cases,” presented by the Consumer Protection Law Committee.* “Counseling the Provocative Client: First Amendment, National Security, Ethics and Professionalism Concerns in Entertainment for the Globalized and Multicultural World,” presented by the Entertainment, Arts & Sports Law Section.* “International Trade: Legal Perspectives for Florida’s Future,” presented by the International Law Section.* “2015 Masters Seminar on Ethics,” presented by the Professional Ethics Committee.* “Setting the Course for Success in the Legal Environment,” presented by the Student Education and Admissions to the Bar Committee.For more information about the Annual Convention, visit www.floridabar.org/annualconvention.last_img read more

iqhrngmx

CDC cites some signs of ebbing US flu activity

first_imgNov 13, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Today’s weekly influenza reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) contain some hints that the fall wave of H1N1 flu may have crested, though cases are still widespread over most of the country.Visits to the CDC network of sentinel doctors for influenza-like illness (ILI) declined last week for the second week in a row, and the number of states with widespread flu activity dropped from 48 to 46, the agency reported.On the other hand, the percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia and flu both continued to climb, the CDC said. In addition, another 26 pediatric deaths linked to confirmed H1N1 cases were reported, bringing the total since April to 156.ILI-related visits last week made up 6.7% of all visits to doctors, which is down from 7.7% the week before, the CDC said in its detailed weekly FluView report. Visits dropped in all regions except New England.”This is the second week of national decreases in ILI after four consecutive weeks of sharp increases,” the agency said in its general H1N1 Situation Update. “While ILI declined nationally, visits to doctors for influenza-like illness remain higher than what is seen during the peak of many regular flu seasons,” the agency update said.The CDC says that all states except Hawaii, Mississippi, Nebraska, and Texas had widespread cases last week; those states had regional activity. Only two states had less-than-widespread activity the previous week.The proportion of deaths related to pneumonia and flu in the CDC’s 122-city mortality reporting system reached 7.7% last week, which was above the epidemic threshold of 6.8% for the week. The percentage has been above the threshold for 6 weeks in a row, the agency said.However, charts in the FluView report show that the numbers of hospitalizations and deaths related to influenza of all types both dropped last week compared with the week before. The charts indicate something in excess of 3,000 hospitalizations and between 100 and 150 deaths last week. The CDC says that more than 99% of viruses in circulation are the 2009 H1N1.Thirty-five children’s deaths related to flu were reported last week. Of those, 26 were linked to confirmed H1N1 infections, while 8 involved influenza A viruses that were not subtyped, and one involved type B, the CDC reported.The number of pediatric deaths attributed to confirmed H1N1 cases since April has reached 156; another 23 cases involved confirmed flu viruses that were not subtyped.The total of 156 is higher than the number for any seasonal flu epidemic of the past 5 years, according to numbers listed in today’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The article says the highest pediatric death toll in that span was 153, with an average of 82.The FluView report says deaths due to confirmed flu from Aug 30 to Nov 7 totaled 877, and there were 22,364 hospitalizations related to confirmed flu in that period.Those numbers include only confirmed flu cases. Yesterday the CDC presented a new estimation method, in part to allow for untested cases. Using that method, officials estimated total US H1N1 deaths since April at 3,900.The number of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 isolates found in the United States through October is 14, out of 256 isolates tested, according to the MMWR article. Twelve of the 14 patients had received the antiviral drug for treatment or prevention.See also: CDC H1N1 Situation Update pagehttp://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htmCDC’s weekly FluView reporthttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/CDC. Update: Influenza activity—United States, August 30–October 31, 2009. MMWR 2009 Nov 13;58(44):1236-41 [Full text]last_img read more

iqhrngmx

MANNM ​Diabetes 1 mile/ 3.2 mile Walk/Run Saturday

first_imgMANNM News:Medical Associates of Northern New Mexico (MANNM), ​http://www.mannm.com/​, invites all members of the public to join in its second ​Diabetes 1 mile/ 3.2 mile Walk/Run. The event is at ​9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 at Rover Park in White Rock​ to raise awareness for Diabetes while supporting two great causes – the ADA Camp 180 New Mexico program for kids with type 1 Diabetes and Self Help, Inc, ​http://selfhelpla.org​ as they celebrate their 50th year supporting people in need in Northern New MexicoThe ADA reports:1 in 11 Americans has diabetes today;Every 23 seconds someone in America is diagnosed with diabetes; andMore than 18,000 youth are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Type 2 diabetes, which occurs more commonly in adults, is where the pancreas produces insulin, however this is either not enough or the body develops resistance to it leading to a shortage of the hormone in the cells. Genetics and lifestyle play a big part in the development of this condition.“Lifestyle modifications play a big role in the management of the disease. This includes paying attention to nutrition and making exercise a habit,” MANNM Endocrinologist Dr. Garimella said. “I see several people who take this to heart and come back with great glucose numbers proving that it really does work. We hope that the event motivates people to come out and get moving to support their own health as well as contribute to two worthy causes.”Last year the event raised $1,990 with money disbursed equally between the ADA Camp 180 NM program for kids and the Los Alamos Auxiliary Fire Brigade http://laafb.wikidot.com/capabilities​​ as part of giving back to the community. The Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation Camp Challenge generously matched the donation for the diabetes camp doubling the amount donated.“We hope this year will be even bigger and better,” said Tonya Sprouse-Mullins, one of the chief organizers of the event. As part of the festivities the ​Los Alamos Co-op,​ ​http://losalamos.coop/​ ​will once again showcase healthy snacks and drinks available at their store to show that healthy eating choices are available locally and easily accessible. Registration forms can be printed from​ ​http://www.mannm.com/​. Completed registration forms with entry fee can be dropped off at the Walk in clinic or mailed to MANNM c/o Tonya Sprouse-Mullins, 3917 West Road, Los Alamos, NM 87544. Online registration is available at ​http://buytickets.at/mannmdiabetes.Same day registration starts at 8 a.m., Oct. 5. Swag bags will be given to the first 110 participants.last_img read more

iqhrngmx

Nautical Institute receives 2010 outstanding service award

first_imgThe winner for Outstanding Service by an Organisation is the London-based Nautical Institute. It was honoured for its support of the professional development of mariners and for its promotion of safety in the maritime industry.The awards are named after Samuel Plimsoll, a British Member of Parliament who strove to end the dangerous practice of overloading vessels. His efforts culminated in legislation passed in 1876 requiring load lines, or Plimsoll marks, to be visible on the hulls of seagoing ships. The awards honour those who, in the spirit of Samuel Plimsoll, make the world a better and safer place for mariners.The Nautical Institute demonstrably embodies that spirit in its work. Founded by a group of master mariners in 1971, the institute has striven to help mariners improve their performance by raising training standards and disseminating information crucial to greater operational efficiency and safety.For example, 20 years ago, the Institute recognized that no operational standards existed for what was then a new technology, dynamic positioning systems. In response, the institute developed a code of practice and a curriculum for training and certifying DP operators. Today schools around the world accredited by The Nautical Institute provide the certification training, while The Nautical Institute itself administers the logbook programme that verifies the mariner’s progress on the path to DP certification.One of the organisation’s most notable contributions to improved safety is the programme makes it possible for the industry to learn from dangerous incidents and implement changes to avoid accidents in the future. The system encourages mariners to report near misses in which they were involved without having their identities publicly revealed. Those reports are then analysed by The Nautical Institute and disseminated in its Seaways magazine.The Nautical Institute’s Chief Executive, Philip Wake, said: ‘We are delighted that our work to improve the safety and efficiency of shipping services through professional standards and development has been recognised by this prestigious Award. It is further encouragement for our members and staff to continue their dedicated efforts for the industry and the protection of the marine environment.’Pictured below is Bridget Hogan, director Publishing and Marketing from The Nautical Institute with left, Captain George Sandberg FNI, president of the Institute’s North East US branch and right, John Gormley, editor of Professional Mariner.last_img read more

iqhrngmx

Basra Gateway expansion moves forward

first_imgWhen fully developed, the new container and general cargo terminal area will comprise 600 m of quay and 50 ha of yard space. Total investment for the first phase of development is USD130 million.In addition to the acquisition of new equipment and IT systems, the terminal is investing heavily in the training of its workforce.”We are confident the new terminal area will boost efficiency and speed the movement of import and export cargo supporting the rapid growth in Iraq’s economy,” said Enrique K. Razon Jr, chairman and president of ICTSI.Although the terminal expansion is focused predominantly on the container business, the Basra Gateway Terminal also has general, ro-ro and project cargo handling capacity.Basra Gateway Terminal ceo Phillip Marsham said in February 2016: “Given the extensive terminal and supporting land areas we possess, we are keen to support our clients’ needs on specialised project cargo opportunities. We are already talking to a number of companies in this respect.” Enrique K. Razon Jr, chairman and president of ICTSI, cuts the ribbon symbolising the formal opening of the Basra Gateway Terminal expansion area – the first entirely foreign financed new port infrastructure in Iraq.www.ictsi.comwww.basragateway.comlast_img read more

iqhrngmx

Canadian truckers seek permit streamlining

first_imgLast summer the MTO confirmed the first round of changes were being implemented. This included changes to the duration of single trip permits from four to seven days, as well as the extension of weekend travel to include loads over current annual dimensions (excluding superloads).  It also included return empty permits being issued at the same time as the loaded permit. “There is no doubt these changes were welcomed by the industry and are making a difference for carriers,” said Jonathan Blackham, OTA’s policy and government affairs assistant. “In a recent meeting with MTO, we were also pleased to hear work will continue to streamline the permitting process in Ontario, which will benefit our carrier members and the overall supply chain.” Some of the 2017 projects being examined include the exploration of the options for electronic single trip permits; the expansion of online capabilities to include self-routing and self-issuance options for single trip permits and a review of the current annual, project and batch permit policies, to develop a better product (simplifying the permit to increase the speed of issuance for all permits).It was also confirmed that a delivery model for non-police escorting options (including necessary legislative changes as well as training and programme development) is underway. It is expected that much of the ground work in this area can be completed over 2017. OTA said it will be holding a meeting involving its heavy specialised division and MTO officials, so members can provide direct input.  www.ontruck.orgwww.mto.gov.on.calast_img read more