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Esports gambling could be good for game publishers – Zelnick

first_img 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyAbdulBasit Saliu Mechanic, Flowmotion Entertainment Inc2 years ago Take-Two was the first of the US Big 3 – Activision Blizzard and EA are the other two- to have it game made into film with Max Payne, and was the first to own a comic book publishing label with Double Take Comics (now defunct). So my first comment above is not so fantasied. Esports gambling could be good for game publishers – ZelnickTake-Two CEO cheers recent Supreme Court decision allowing states to legalize sports gambling, says its likely to intersect with games industry “in the relatively near future”Tom Mc SheaThursday 17th May 2018Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareThe specter of gambling has hung over the video game industry lately as loot boxes have been brought into question, but more traditional gambling may soon enter the scene. In a post-earnings investor call today, Take-Two Interactive CEO Strauss Zelnick talked about how the recent Supreme Court ruling allowing states to determine their own laws regarding sports gambling could have just as big an impact on esports.”We certainly think it’s a good decision. We think there may indeed be a meaningfully positive influence on our business,” Zelnick said.However, Zelnick was not able to share any detailed ideas about how esports gambling would be implemented or on how much impact it could have on future earnings, saying, “We don’t have any expectations right now. We’re simply observing that there are potential opportunities in the future and I’d be very surprised if sports gambling didn’t intersect with the industry at some point in the relatively near future.” According to ESPN, before the Supreme Court ruling lifted the federal ban on sports gambling, Take-Two’s partner in the NBA 2K eLeague, the National Basketball Association, said it would seek a 1% payout from every bet placed on the league. No further steps have been taken by the NBA to ensure it receives such a payout, but if that does become a standard practice across states and sports leagues, video game companies might also look for a payout of their own for bets made in esports competitions regarding their properties. As has been a common theme in investor calls, Fortnite was brought up on multiple occasions. Take-Two Interactive didn’t hint about its own entry into the soon-to-be-bustling battle royale genre, though. “I don’t think what one takes away from this properly is that a particular approach, a particular mode, has suddenly redefined the business,” Zelnick said. “I don’t believe that’s the case. I think if one changes one’s business to follow other people’s big hits, to constantly be playing catch up, and to say that you wouldn’t be in second place is an understatement. You might remain in last place. It’s our job to constantly innovate, and more often than not, that has led to success.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “Big hits, by their very nature, are unexpected and what drives a big hit is innovation and not derivation. That’s what we’re proud of around here. When we put out Red Dead Redemption, the conventional wisdom was that Western titles don’t work in the video game business. I think the fact that Fortnite surprised everyone is just a reflection of the fact that if you innovate and give consumers what they want, you can get an extraordinary result.”Elsewhere in the call, the prospect of Take-Two expanding beyond the video game space was brought up. “When you look at the quality of the intellectual property created and owned by ourselves and by some of our competitors, it’s hard to imagine that there wouldn’t be opportunities in other forms of entertainment,” Zelnick said.Even though such a partnership is possible (and was explored with the ill-fated BioShock film project), Zelnick may have soured on that idea. “If it makes sense to enter other forms of entertainment in which some traditional media companies are already experts, you would imagine that kind of consolidation would have some kind of industrial logic. But I would observe that not only has that not occurred but that some legacy entertainment companies have in fact exited interactive entertainment,” Zelnick said. Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesEA leans on Apex Legends and live services in fourth quarterQ4 and full year revenues close to flat and profits take a tumble, but publisher’s bookings still up double-digitsBy Brendan Sinclair 4 hours agoEA Play Live set for July 22Formerly E3-adjacent event moves to take place a month and half after the ESA’s showBy Jeffrey Rousseau 5 hours agoLatest comments (3)AbdulBasit Saliu Mechanic, Flowmotion Entertainment Inc2 years ago At one point, the company will become The Take-Two Group, and own it existing publishing labels and also Bethesda Softworks, own 9 Story Media, IDW, and Hollywood studio A24 films (i can see that happening even though it still a fantasy). Go TTWO! 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyAbdulBasit Saliu Mechanic, Flowmotion Entertainment Inc2 years ago From 1998-2008 they were the 2nd biggest video game company in the west by revenue until Activision merged with Blizzard to become the biggest taking them down to 3rd place. And in that time, Ubisoft continues to be 4th, THQ went bankrupt with a new company using it name, same was Midway Games and many more. Plus Take-Two are a cash machine so buying ZeniMax/Bethesda will let them retake their 2nd position again.center_img 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replySign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

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China Sunergy sees first-quarter revenue increase

first_imgChina Sunergy sees first-quarter revenue increaseChina Sunergy saw revenue rise 13.4% in the first quarter of 2013 as it continued to expand operations in emerging markets. The company is aiming for a return to net profit in 2013. July 1, 2013 Edgar Meza Finance Legal Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share China Sunergy Co., Ltd. posted a 13.4% increase in revenue in the first three months of 2013 as it continued to expand operations in emerging markets and managed to narrow its net loss from loss from $70.5 million in the fourth quarter of last year to $22.9million.The Nanjing-based module manufacturer said its shipments in the period totaled 102.5 MW, an increase of 30.7% from 78.4 MW a quarter ago. Module shipments represented 98.3 MW, or 95.9% of total shipments. The company said the average selling price for its modules was $0.59 per watt, a 7.8% decrease from the fourth quarter of 2012.The company saw its operating loss decrease from $42.4 million a quarter ago to $15 million while achieving a gross margin of 0.4%, compared to negative 3.7% in the final quarter of 2012.China Sunergy CEO Stephen Cai said, “We are pleased that despite the industry’s persistent oversupply, the company was able to grow revenue and returned to positive gross margin in the first quarter. We continued our geographic diversification, and took further steps to reduce operating expenses.”Popular content Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… iAbout these recommendations Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content pv magazine test: February 2021 results pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com We are pleased to report on the next batch of energy yield results from the outdoor test field in Xi’an, China. We prese… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Longi crowned king of solar with 24.5 GW of panels shipped in 2020 Vincent Shaw 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With production capacity expanded for solar wafers, cells and modules last year, and set to rise again in 2021, the gian… China’s Covid recovery saw green bond issuance rebound in second half of 2020 Max Hall 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The $18bn worth of sustainable finance instruments floated in the nation last year marked a retreat from previous highs … Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… African solar installers feel the pinch of rising panel prices Max Hall 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With Chinese manufacturers having warned they will pass on escalating component costs, and shipping expenses soaring sin… pv magazine test: February 2021 results pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com We are pleased to report on the next batch of energy yield results from the outdoor test field in Xi’an, China. We prese… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Longi crowned king of solar with 24.5 GW of panels shipped in 2020 Vincent Shaw 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With production capacity expanded for solar wafers, cells and modules last year, and set to rise again in 2021, the gian… China’s Covid recovery saw green bond issuance rebound in second half of 2020 Max Hall 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The $18bn worth of sustainable finance instruments floated in the nation last year marked a retreat from previous highs … Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… African solar installers feel the pinch of rising panel prices Max Hall 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With Chinese manufacturers having warned they will pass on escalating component costs, and shipping expenses soaring sin… pv magazine test: February 2021 results pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com We are pleased to report on the next batch of energy yield results from the outdoor test field in Xi’an, China. We prese… 123456Elsewhere on pv magazine… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. Any other transfer to third parties will not take place unless this is justified on the basis of applicable data protection regulations or if pv magazine is legally obliged to do so.You may revoke this consent at any time with effect for the future, in which case your personal data will be deleted immediately. Otherwise, your data will be deleted if pv magazine has processed your request or the purpose of data storage is fulfilled.Further information on data privacy can be found in our Data Protection Policy.iAbout these recommendationsKeep up to date pv magazine Global offers daily updates of the latest photovoltaics news. We also offer comprehensive global coverage of the most important solar markets worldwide. Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. 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We prese… China’s push for decarbonization Andreas Walstad 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The carbon market is finally a reality in China. After 10 years of delays, regional pilot schemes and general uncertaint… PV feed in, certified pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… Pretty stressful Cornelia Lichner 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com To find out whether a module is susceptible to potential-induced degradation, you can conduct stress tests in a climate chamber. The ideal format pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The speed at which manufacturers are introducing changes from one product generation to the next is accelerating – curre… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

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Chinese government attempts to shore up United PV share price

first_imgChinese government attempts to shore up United PV share priceState-owned investor pumps $710,000 into ailing Hong Kong developer. Shares stabilized at $0.13 this morning from year-high of $0.20 on June 2. July 10, 2015 Max Hall Finance Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share With the share price of Chinese solar companies following the rest of the market by tanking, Hong Kong-based developer United Photovoltaics Group has had a shot in the arm from its major shareholder – a state-owned company. An update on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange yesterday (Thursday) revealed United PV‘s major shareholder, China Merchants New Energy Group Ltd, had boosted its shareholding by an additional 6,306,000 shares. China Merchants New Energy (CMNE) is a subsidiary of the state-owned China Merchants Group which, according to United PV’s website, has a 24.09 per cent holding in the developer. It is not clear whether that figure includes the new shareholding, acquired for an average price of HK$0.87 ($0.11) per share. If not updated, the new acquisition, would account for an additional 4.2 per cent of the company. Reasons for the expanded shareholding A statement on United PV’s website outlined the reasons for its state-sponsored benefactor’s move, stating: “CMNE is positive towards United PV’s future development and revenue growth, given its low price-earnings ratio, high margin of safety and strong cash position. “It is believed that the gradual growth environment of this listed company has given its shareholders a precious opportunity to raise their stakes for better returns. “Upon completion of the increase in shareholdings, CMNE might seek to further increase its stake in United PV through a number of ways going through the Hong Kong Exchanges and clearing limited.” United PV’s share price has mirrored the woes of the wider Chinese market this month, rallying HK$0.09 ($0.01) this morning to HK$0.99 ($0.13) from a 52-week-high of HK$1.57 ($0.20), on June 2.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Solar 101: Attaching your PV system to your roof John Fitzgerald Weaver 23 April 2021 pv-magazine.com A solar racking system’s strength is determined in part by the metal racking, but it also depends on the roof’s underlying structure. Asia Pacific’s solarized digitization agenda Selva Ozelli, Esq. 23 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The virtual 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum was hosted in March by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment,… Longi crowned king of solar with 24.5 GW of panels shipped in 2020 Vincent Shaw 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With production capacity expanded for solar wafers, cells and modules last year, and set to rise again in 2021, the gian… Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… African solar installers feel the pinch of rising panel prices Max Hall 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com With Chinese manufacturers having warned they will pass on escalating component costs, and shipping expenses soaring sin… Korea shifts into top gear pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com There is a fresh sense of urgency and common purpose in South Korea toward combating climate change. In 2021, government… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. Any other transfer to third parties will not take place unless this is justified on the basis of applicable data protection regulations or if pv magazine is legally obliged to do so.You may revoke this consent at any time with effect for the future, in which case your personal data will be deleted immediately. Otherwise, your data will be deleted if pv magazine has processed your request or the purpose of data storage is fulfilled.Further information on data privacy can be found in our Data Protection Policy.iAbout these recommendationsKeep up to date pv magazine Global offers daily updates of the latest photovoltaics news. We also offer comprehensive global coverage of the most important solar markets worldwide. Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Out with the old… A guide to successful inverter replacement , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRoberto Arana-Gonzalez, Service Sales Manager EMEA, SungrowFranco Marino, Regional Service Mana… Insight @ Energy Storage North America 2020 11 November 2020 pv-magazine.com Developed and moderated by pv magazine, the panel sessions address a hot topic within the industry, from multiple angles. iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Korea shifts into top gear pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com There is a fresh sense of urgency and common purpose in South Korea toward combating climate change. In 2021, government… China’s push for decarbonization Andreas Walstad 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The carbon market is finally a reality in China. After 10 years of delays, regional pilot schemes and general uncertaint… Solar and silver price hikes pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The PV industry has experienced several rounds of price increases since the second half of 2020, from polysilicon to mat… Final thought: Solar ethics, forced labor pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)Issue 04 – 2021 April 7, 2021 pv maga… Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… pv magazine test: February 2021 results pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com We are pleased to report on the next batch of energy yield results from the outdoor test field in Xi’an, China. We prese… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

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Hugh Graham Wins Villarboit Grand Prix

first_imgIt all came down to experience Sunday at Halton Place as three veteran Canadian Equestrian Team members claimed the top three placings in the $40,000 Villarboit Grand Prix at the Canadian Country Classic.In a crowded jump-off field of 10 horses, Hugh Graham of King Ridge Stables (King,ON) guided grey Canadian Sport Horse gelding Executive Privilege 3E to victory in a time of 31.10 seconds; hot on his heels was Beth Underhill (King, ON) who went first in the jump-off and stopped the clock at 31.88 seconds.Finishing in third spot was Ainsley Vince of Milton who blazed around the course on Freida in the fastest time and seemed poised for victory until her mount Frieda, downed a heartbreak rail on the last fence of the course.“It was a tough enough course – I was surprised – and technical enough,” said Graham, who also took fourth place with Canadian Sport Horse gelding Fifth Estate 3E.The class was a showcase for the show jumping talent emerging from King Ridge Stables’ breeding operation: 10-year-old Executive Privilege 3E was the first foal born in the King Ridge program, out of Galaxy by Class Action, two horses that Graham previously rode.Fifth Estate 3E is also by Class Action, out of Alley Cat. Roberto Teran (King, ON) also made Sunday’s jump-off round with King Ridge’s Grand Finale 3E, a talented young Canadian Sport Horse mare that has dominated the Jump Canada Young Horse Development Series in the seven and eight year classes this year.“It’s been a long haul, a lot of work and a lot of training. It’s nice when you get results like today,” says Graham, who’ll return to Halton Place for next week’s $40,000 SWISSCAN Grand Prix on Sunday, September 5th.Beth Underhill was delighted with her mount Quelqu’un de la Musardiere’s second-place finish, as it was the 10-year-old gelding’s first grand prix.“He’s a horse owned by one of my students (Christopher Cullen, also of King. ON), who has been working and gave me the chance to ride him. It’s a great opportunity,” said Underhill. “He was very solid in his first round of the grand prix, the times were close and he did everything I asked of him. I couldn’t be more thrilled.”Underhill praised the course, designed by David Ballard, as offering a learning curve for young horses, while still presenting a challenge for more seasoned horses.Ainsley Vince said Frieda, a nine-year-old Sachsen-Anhaltiner mare by For Future “is very fast and good on the turns, but still a hair green.” As well as Sunday’s third place finish, Vince and the agile little (15.3 hand) mare claimed first place in Friday’s Open Welcome and Vince has high hopes for the horse, owned by the KMA Group. “This is the fifth year I’ve been riding Frieda, who was purchased as a youngster, and I’m very excited about her.”Second in the Open Welcome was Roberto Teran, (King, ON) on Grand Finale 3E and third was Chris Sorensen, (Caledon, ON) on SS Bobby.Halton Place owner Timur Leckebusch has been pleased with the response to Week One’s classes.“It’s been fantastic. We’re actually sold out of stalls,” said Leckebusch, who has devoted two decades to turning the 200-acre former hog farm into a premier European-style   show jumping venue. “It’s taken a lot longer than I thought it would, but Halton Place is at the point where it’s looking good enough for me to say I’m proud of it.”Although a World Cup Qualifier had originally been planned for the Canadian Country Classic, after a crowded schedule that included a new FEI class at Spruce Meadows, Alberta and a new $1 million grand prix in Saugerties, New York, Leckebusch decided to cancel the big class and instead increase prize money in the amateur and hunter divisions. He said the move to do so has been so positively received, he plans to do the same in the future, helping to build the development of the   sport below the elite level, concentrating on enriching the pot at the grassroots of the sport for rising talent – both rider and equine. Leckebusch also wants to create events that will be inviting to the general public, not just the equestrian crowd, to build greater awareness for horse sport.Highlights of Week Two of the Canadian Country Classic (Sept 1st – 5th) will include Saturday’s Team Charity Challenge at 1:30 p.m. and Sunday’s $40,000 SWISSCAN Grand Prix at 2 p.m.RESULTS$40,000 Villarboit Grand Prix (Aug 29th)Rider – Horse – Town – Results1. Hugh Graham – Executive Privilege – King. ON – 0: 0 – 31:10 secs2. Beth Underhill – Quelqu’un De La Musardiere – King. ON – 0: 0 – 31:88 secs3. Ainsley Vince – Frieda – Milton. ON – 0: 4 – 29:12 secs4. Hugh Graham – Fifth Estate 3E – King, ON – 0: 4 – 31:96 secs 5. Neil Babcock – Campino – King, ON – 0: 4 – 32:67 secs Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! SIGN UP We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. Horse Sport Enews Email*last_img read more

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School shooting suspect on FBI’s radar since 2013: Authorities

first_imgMarion County Sheriffâ??s Office(OCALA, Fla.) — The FBI had the suspect in a Florida school shooting last week on its radar since 2013, new documents show.Sky Bouche, 19, shot a student in the ankle at a high school in Ocala, according to the Marion County Sheriff’s Office.The victim, whose identity has not been released, suffered non-life threatening injuries.Approximately five years before that shooting, the Federal Bureau of Investigation contacted authorities in Florida after Bouche “[triggered] an internet alarm when he made inappropriate YouTube comments on Columbine school shooting videos,” according to a press release from the Ocala Police Department.According to the press release, Bouche posted comments such as: “I’m thinking about doing my school the same way, I have enough guns and ammo. I have been planning for months, but not sure when to do it.”Officials then interviewed Bouche, who admitted to making the comments but said he only did it to “gather attention because he felt hopeless,” according to the press release.Following the interview, officials searched Bouche’s home for firearms and located several replicas of guns, such as air-soft BB guns and pellet guns.No criminal charges were filed against Bouche in the 2013 incident, and he was referred to suicidal and violence risk assessments, according to Ocala Police.Bouche faces five charges last week’s shooting, including terrorism and aggravated assault with a firearm, according to the sheriff’s office.He is currently being held at the Marion County jail on no bond.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Lecturer

first_img* How did you hear about this employment opportunity?Advertisement/PublicationWebsitePublic Job Posting (auemployment.com site)Academic ConferenceAgency ReferralInternal Job PostingPersonal ReferralVeterans Assistance Services (Veteran Job Boards, Military BaseServices, State Vet Rep, etc.)Disability Assistance Services (Disability Job Boards, ABLENetwork, Voc-Rehab referral, etc.)Other Posting DetailsJob TitleLecturerPosting NumberP0181FJob Description SummaryThe Department of Aerospace Engineering at Auburn Universityinvites applications for a non-tenure-track Lecturer in AerospaceEngineering. The appointment will be for nine months and isrenewable annually. Additional teaching opportunities in the summermay also be available and are subject to the availability of funds.The primary responsibility of a successful candidate for thisposition is to teach a selection of undergraduate aerospaceengineering courses required of students of the Department ofAerospace Engineering. The successful candidate will be expected tobring experience, innovation, enthusiasm, technology, andleadership to the courses. Under typical circumstances, theteaching load will be three courses per semester, which includescourse and laboratory development and management activities. Inaddition to instructional duties, successful candidates willcontribute to the instructional mission of the department throughparticipation on faculty committees and be expected to mentorstudents through possible participation in student organizations,competition activities, and other mentoring and knowledgeenhancement opportunities.Auburn University is understanding of and sensitive to the familyneeds of faculty, including dual-career couples.http://www.auburn.edu/academic/provost/pdf/guidelines-dual-career-services.pdf * Please enter the specifics of the option you selectedabove:(Open Ended Question) Minimum QualificationsSuccessful applicants must possess a doctorate in aerospaceengineering or a closely related field from an ABET accreditedinstitution prior to the date of employment. We seek candidateswith already demonstrated effectiveness in working with aerospaceengineering students and professionals. In addition, applicantsmust have experience teaching at an ABET accredited institution ofhigher education in the area of aerospace structures. The candidatemust also have excellent interpersonal, written and communicationskills. The successful candidate must meet eligibility requirementsto work in the U.S. at the time the appointment is scheduled tobegin and continue working legally for the proposed term ofemployment. Salary will be commensurate with experience andqualifications.Desired QualificationsDemonstrated potential for excellence in teachingExcellent communication skillsSpecial Instructions to ApplicantsTo be considered, qualified candidates must submit a cover letter,resume, transcripts, statement of teaching philosophy, studentcourse evaluations, and contact information of three references tothe job postingOpen DateClose DateOpen Until FilledYesReferences required for this position?YesIf yes, minimum number requested3Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Optional & Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover LetterTranscriptsCurriculum VitaeStatement of Teaching PhilosophyStudent/Teacher/Course Evaluations/EffectivenessOptional DocumentsOther Documentationlast_img read more

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Bank of America will pay $300K to settle DOJ mortgage lending discrimination claim

first_imgActing US Attorney for Eastern District of New York Seth DuCharme and Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan (Getty, Twitter, iStock)Bank of America and the U.S. Department of Justice reached a settlement over allegations the bank denied mortgages and home equity loans to adults with disabilities who were under legal guardianship.The bank’s alleged actions relating to mortgages ran from 2010 to 2016, and violated the Fair Housing Act, according to the Justice Department. The government also said the bank’s practice regarding home equity loans lasted until 2017.Under the terms of Thursday’s settlement, Bank of America did not admit fault but will pay $4,000 to about 75 eligible loan applicants who “were affected by the bank’s prior discriminatory policies,” according to a DOJ news release. The total payment will amount to around $300,000, the government said. The settlement still must be approved by a judge.The Justice Department notified Bank of America as far back as 2016 that it was looking into its mortgage lending practices as possible violations of the Fair Housing Act.The civil complaint filed in federal court in New York alleged Bank of America denied loans even “where the applicants provided court orders that specifically granted the guardian or conservator the legal authority to the mortgaged property.”Seth D. DuCharme, acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, said the settlement “ensures that Bank of America will no longer discriminate against people with disabilities when issuing mortgage and home equity loans, and compensates the victims for their losses.”According to the settlement, Bank of America said it “did not unlawfully discriminate against any person based on a disability,” but has since changed its guidelines. The bank said it entered into the settlement “solely for the purpose of avoiding costly litigation with the United States.”As part of the settlement, Bank of America agreed to maintain its new loan processing and underwriting guidelines and continue training its employees about those guidelines.The settlement comes less than two weeks after a news report showed that a separate federal investigation into discriminatory lending at Bank of America in Philadelphia stalled in late 2018, after complaints from the bank. The report, from ProPublica and The Capitol Forum revealed that the scuttled Bank of America inquiry was “part of a larger, previously unreported pattern in which the Trump administration has pulled back on civil rights enforcement as a part of its overall relaxation of bank oversight.” This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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A divided suburbia: Race, class, and the endless struggle for affordable housing

first_img(Illustration by Sarah Hanson)This story was originally published in March 2020.Last November, a 40-year fight over an affordable housing development in Long Island — a legal battle that had gone all the way to the Supreme Court — finally came to a vote.Despite locals arguing for decades that it would cause traffic and crowd schools, Suffolk County legislators allocated $2.4 million to the 146-unit project in East Northport, a hamlet in the town of Huntington.For many proponents, the issue boiled down to a largely white community trying to shut minorities out. Indeed, the Supreme Court in 1988 let stand a court ruling that Huntington had violated the Fair Housing Act with racially discriminatory zoning — essentially restricting multifamily development to the town’s urban renewal area, where more than half of residents were minorities. In the white parts of town, expensive single-family homes prevailed.ADVERTISEMENT“We will no longer perpetuate the segregation of our communities,” said Suffolk County Executive Steven Bellone after November’s vote. “Everyone deserves access to fair housing in every corner of Suffolk.”The same polarized debate is playing out in a host of suburbs surrounding New York City, including Westchester, northern New Jersey and Connecticut, as the shortage of affordable housing grows increasingly urgent.Many developers say community opposition, byzantine local zoning laws and the economics of affordable housing have prevented them from building more in the suburbs. But Elaine Gross, who runs regional civil rights group ERASE Racism, said the problem is not bureaucracy so much as an undercurrent of racism — particularly on Long Island, where her organization is based.“They say that this is going to raise our taxes, make our schools crowded,” Gross said. “But if this is a community that is mostly white, they’re really saying, ‘Well, we really don’t want black or brown people.’”In 2015, the Obama administration introduced the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule, requiring local governments to take steps to address segregation in their housing systems. But the Trump administration has worked to unravel the policy.The rollback has been a major blow for advocates who say stripping away oversight and accountability will only empower NIMBYism in areas where affordable dwellings are sorely needed and development can be a fraught process.“Outside of the five boroughs, everyone is fending for themselves,” said George Zayas, principal of Alma Realty, a New York-based landlord and developer with projects in Peekskill, Hempstead, Yonkers and Westchester. Each municipality is its own “little fiefdom,” he added, with layers of unique rules and approval processes.Community opposition — often coded discrimination — also comes into play. “Affordable housing is taboo,” Zayas said. “There’s this idea of ‘Not here. We don’t want that.’”A developer who worked in the suburbs said he had also witnessed it. “I definitely think that in some communities there’s a racial dimension to it,” he said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “There’s also a class dimension.”ERASE Racism’s Gross noted that just one week before the Huntington vote, Newsday had published a startling account of Long Island brokerages steering minority home shoppers away from white neighborhoods. The exposé, which triggered outrage and put the real estate industry on notice, undoubtedly put pressure on local legislators too. State lawmakers are now subpoenaing brokers to testify after 67 of 68 industry representatives failed to show up to a December hearing.“There’s a lot of talk about realtors right now because of Newsday’s investigation and that’s a good thing,” she said. “But it’s not just about the realtors — it’s about the municipalities, local governments and what they’re doing and not doing.”The federal Fair Housing Act more than a half century ago made it illegal to refuse to sell or rent a home to anyone because of race, disability, religion, sex, family status or national origin.Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, in an interview with The Real Deal late last year, defended his shift away from the Obama-era measures. “I expect criticisms,” he said. “People are creatures of habit. They don’t like change.”What that change will look like, though, is hard to determine — the policy is still new. But Moses Gates, vice president for housing and neighborhood planning at the Regional Plan Association, said he believes slashing the Obama fair-housing rule will allow local governments to claim they are doing a good job on affordable housing without being held accountable by Washington.The Beacon at Garvies Point in Glen Cove, New York“Where municipalities don’t want [affordable housing] at all, the HUD rule changes kind of reinforced that mentality and makes them a little more secure in it,” he said.Westchester’s 11th hourIn Westchester County, the threat of drawn-out timelines works against affordable housing projects, said Compass broker Francie Malina, who leads a seven-person team specializing in new development.“It’s unaffordable to build affordable because, by the time you get approved, you’ve got to charge such a high rent or price for your condo in order to make the money back,” she said.In recent years, Malina said she has noticed a shift in the shoppers coming to her for homes in Westchester County. “It used to be Manhattanites,” she said. “Now it’s Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens.”Most prospective buyers and renters are drawn to the area because they want more space, Malina said, or to send their kids to the public schools.But diversity in Westchester remains minimal. Just 16.6 percent of residents in the county are African-American and 6.4 percent are of Asian descent, according to recent census estimates. Often minorities are concentrated in certain neighborhoods, leaving others with precious few persons of color.The county has also faced scrutiny over the years for its poor record on fair housing. In 2006, the Anti-Discrimination Center filed a lawsuit against the county arguing that to obtain $52 million in federal funds, Westchester had fraudulently certified paperwork to show it complied with fair-housing laws. As part of a 2009 settlement, Westchester agreed to build 750 affordable units in 30 mostly white communities.In the years that followed, the county submitted 10 zoning analyses to the Obama administration to prove it had solved its exclusionary housing problem. Every single one was rejected.Then, in 2017, the fight appeared to abruptly end: Just one day after the county’s 11th attempt, the Trump administration gave it the green light.A spokesman for the Democratic Caucus of the Westchester County Board of Legislators told The New York Times that the only difference between the 10 rejected analyses and the one that got through was “the administration who approved it.” A HUD spokesman dismissed the idea of governmental bias as “horse hockey.”Decades before, communities had been designed and constructed without any federal intervention — laying the foundation for modern housing segregation.Perhaps most infamously, in 1947, Long Island developer William Levitt embarked on a project that would cement his vision of the New York City suburb and become a model the rest of the nation would emulate: white, middle to upper class and conservative.At the height of the mass-manufacture of Levittown, which sits on a seven-square-mile tract in Nassau County near the village of Hempstead, a house was completed every 16 minutes. The 17,000-home development was a haven for returning World War II veterans, who were incentivized to buy property with inexpensive mortgages and no down payment.But deed covenants restricted sales to white buyers only. At its launch, Levittown was 100 percent white.In 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law, but segregated housing remains widespread across the country. In few places is it more pronounced than in Nassau County.“People have known on Long Island for decades that we weren’t doing the right thing,” Gross said, noting that too much emphasis has been placed on single-family homes, which are no longer inexpensive options.Six miles west of Levittown sits the multicultural, working-class town of Hempstead. The median income is $58,476, and its population is 51 percent black and 32 percent Hispanic. But in Levittown itself, change has been slow.The town was 89 percent white with a median household income of $150,900, according to the 2015 American Community Survey. Some blocks remained 98 percent white.Labyrinthine localities While development in New York City is governed by the City Council, in the greater New York metro region, some 782 municipalities control their own land use, according to the Regional Plan Association. Long Island alone has 175 zoning and planning districts, including 126 in Nassau County. Westchester has 89 zoning and planning districts, and 396 localities in New Jersey and 76 in Connecticut control their own land use.Getting zoning variances in the five boroughs can be complicated, but many housing projects don’t require them. In the suburbs, however, nearly every development must get the blessing of local zoning officials, sometimes in the face of fierce opposition from residents.“It all depends on the town and what you’re building,” Zayas said. “If someone really wants affordable housing, they’ll get it done but not if it’s a homeless shelter or 100 percent affordable. If it’s 20 percent set aside for lower-income families, you’ll get comments on the design, but no one has a pitchfork.”An investigation last year by the Connecticut Mirror and ProPublica showed that dozens of towns in Connecticut had blocked the construction of any privately developed apartments in their communities for decades. In Westport, a traditionally Democratic area, only 65 affordable units had been approved for construction in 30 years, the report noted.In Long Island, the mass production of cheap, single-family homes on Long Island accelerated white flight, which had lasting effects. A 2002 study from ERASE Racism ranked Nassau County as the most segregated in the nation. Census data from 2010 showed the county ranked the highest in segregation compared with counties of similar size.“Having done civil rights work nationwide, and in the Deep South, the level of negative reaction you get [on Long Island] to an affordable housing proposal is very visceral, comparable to or more intense than anything I’ve seen anywhere in the country,” said Thomas Silverstein, an attorney who specializes in fair housing at the D.C.-based Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “People moved out to the suburbs, defining their lives and existence in opposition to what they perceive to be wrong with the city, which is racially coded in a lot of ways.”The Obama administration’s AFFH rule required local governments to track patterns of poverty and segregation with a checklist of 92 questions to gain access to federal housing funds. Intended to boost enforcement of the Fair Housing Act, its implementation was just getting started when the Trump administration reversed it.“What are we trying to accomplish with Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing?” Carson posited in his sit-down with TRD. “[Critics] are trying to stop segregation and, in order to do so, create these massive surveys. They come up with all kinds of statistics but nothing changes. We are saying, Why is there segregation?”Asked about the scale of the problem, Carson said, “I don’t know if I would say [housing segregation] is widespread. Does it exist? Of course.”Silverstein sees things differently. “The 2015 rule created a process for addressing opposition to affordable housing development that would disproportionately serve people of color and people with disabilities and other protected classes in white suburbs,” he said. “The new proposed rule does away with that process.”One Park Place in Peekskill, New YorkInstead, municipalities can choose to implement any three measures of 16 that HUD has defined as barriers to desegregating housing, Silverstein said.“Some are low-hanging fruit, and others are not relevant at all,” he added.But he cautioned that the Obama rule was not a panacea. “It would be naive to suggest that, since 2015, wealthier white suburbs have dramatically started changing their behavior,” he said. “If you have a HUD requirement, HUD still has to enforce it, exercise real oversight, and this 2015 rule was really only being very seriously implemented for a very short period of time. Some jurisdictions hadn’t even implemented it.”Still, such measures can be the difference between action and inaction, according to Gates. “For municipalities that don’t value affordable housing, you need more of a stick, quite honestly,” he said. “In New Jersey, there’s a real judicial stick to create affordable housing in municipalities that don’t value it.”One of the most racially diverse states in the country, New Jersey still remains highly segregated. While 44 percent of the state’s residents are non-white, 22 percent of the municipalities there are more than 90 percent white, according to the American Community Survey.A 2017 ruling by the state’s Supreme Court — the “judicial stick” Moses was referring to — determined that towns would be held accountable for a 16-year “gap period” where fair-housing laws were not being properly adhered to. The court mandated that towns across the state zone for 100,000 additional units of affordable housing over the next decade.“We have fair housing settlements in place with more than 300 towns in New Jersey right now,” said Anthony Campisi, a spokesman for the Fair Share Housing Center, a public-interest organization based in New Jersey. He said the litigation, which kicked off in 2015, had “opened the floodgates” for getting towns on board with aggressive fair-housing measures.As a result, he said, “we think we have the strongest fair-housing framework of any state in history.”Approval migrainesScott Rechler’s RXR Realty and a previous developer spent a decade to gain approval for twin condo and rental developments in Long Island’s Garvies Point. Closings at the luxury Beacon condo are expected to begin this year, while the Harbor Landing rental building has just opened its doors. Along the way, the developer battled staunch community opposition, including five Article 78 lawsuits, said Joseph Graziose, an RXR vice president.The Garvies Point projects have affordable units — a minimum of 10 percent is mandated by the Long Island Workforce Housing Act, a state law passed in 2008 — and Graziose said the community welcomed it. But if the challenges of building a more affordable project would render it unprofitable, it likely will not happen.“We want to do good in communities, and if an affordable housing component is what’s needed, we’re going to figure out a way to do it,” he said. “But at the end of the day, one plus one has got to equal two, right? Developers, investors, people aren’t going to go into something that is a loss.”Jon Vogel, senior vice president of the publicly traded real estate investment trust AvalonBay Communities, said the need to address housing supply — in Long Island, in particular — is urgent.“Long Island has nothing,” he said. “There is no one in Long Island saying, ‘Hey, we need more affordable housing,’ other than a couple of smart planners.”Housing stock, in general, is in short supply, he added, a point that’s particularly pressing as younger people try to enter the market.What’s the sticking point holding up more development? “I think the answers range from misunderstanding of what is being offered in terms of high-quality rental housing … to more nefarious instincts related to race and other concerns,” Vogel said. “It’s an unfortunate situation, but I think it’s mostly a combination of misunderstanding and misplaced fear.”Near the Long Island Rail Road’s Huntington Station, a high-density rental development from AvalonBay was stalled for years because of opposition from residents. It finally opened in 2014.David Pennetta, the director of Cushman & Wakefield’s Long Island office, said community members had initially complained about people coming from “Brooklyn and the Bronx” to fill the project’s 379 units. But in the past five years, he said, two thirds of the residents in those apartments come from within a half a mile of the building.The project’s rental units go for as much as $3,435, according to the developer. Nearby, a residential complex that was purchased by private equity firm Eagle Rock Advisors in 2008 and renovated is advertising a two-bedroom unit for about $2,500 per month, according to the company’s website.Some developers are trying novel approaches to get approval for residential projects in the suburbs. “A development in Smithtown, Suffolk County, is doing all the infrastructure work, which helps to convince the village to get on board,” a person familiar with the development said. “[The developer] is working to gentrify the neighborhood, bring more housing to the neighborhood, but not every village or township wants that.”In Peekskill, on Metro-North’s Hudson Line, Alma Realty decided to build a 183-unit luxury development, which it expected would be more welcomed by local government than low-income housing.“A lot of these towns want to attract higher-earning residents to increase their tax rate. They want to bring in more well-heeled people with more disposable income,” Zayas said. “There was zero interest in affordable housing.”Even so, the firm — which primarily owns rent-regulated multifamily buildings in New York City but has recently been doing more ground-up development — also spent years gaining approval, during which time “two or three mayors” cycled through, according to Zayas, who said the project ended up being the largest in Peekskill’s history.Seth Pinsky, a former RXR executive, said more attention should be paid to where elected officials are creating affordable units, and for whom.“In a world of limited resources, governments can create many more units for middle-income households with a fixed amount of money than they can for lower-income households,” he said. “It should not be surprising, therefore, that this is often the part of the market that elected officials target.”Moving the needleSince the Newsday investigation came out in November, sparking condemnation of race-based steering from the public and the wider industry, brokers have been on high alert, particularly on Long Island.The National Association of Realtors has also overhauled its approach with plans to review state licensing laws, conduct anti-bias training and offer a fair-housing testing program.But developers say potential changes from New York’s State Legislature, going forward, could make constructing affordable projects more difficult. AvalonBay’s Vogel said the cost of building housing outside of New York City would be greatly increased if legislation mandating prevailing wage for workers on some developments — a bill that was left off last year’s raft of progressive reforms — were to pass.The plan, which was included in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s January state budget proposal, would require developers to pay a “prevailing wage” on projects where government subsidies cover 30 percent of the total cost if it exceeds $5 million. But such legislation would, in effect, force developers to pay union wages in many cases.As such, Vogel said he is keeping a close watch as the bill gains traction in Albany. The potential increase in construction costs for developing housing could be 25 to 50 percent, he said.“At that point the value proposition isn’t there to invest in housing,” Vogel said. “Not all our projects have [tax abatements], but many in Westchester and Long Island do.”Unlike the rent-reform measures passed last year, which only affected existing housing stock, a prevailing-wage bill could change the financial calculus for future affordable housing projects in the suburbs.Like last year’s version of the bill, some existing projects that receive tax exemptions would be exempt, and multifamily developments where 30 percent of units are affordable would also be spared.On the heels of HUD’s fair housing rollback and continuing local opposition to large development, a prevailing-wage bill that does not exempt affordable housing could hinder developers’ projects — and also stymie efforts to diversify New York’s suburbs.“Setting the threshold at 30 percent will probably allow most of these projects to move forward without setting prevailing wage,” said one developer who asked to not be named, citing the sensitivity of the negotiations. “If not, it would grind them to a halt.”last_img read more

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Austin Travel adds a Beulas Glory interdecker

first_imgAustin Travel, trading as Scotline Tours, has taken delivery of an MAN RR4 with wheelchair-accessible Beulas Glory interdecker body, supplied by Moseley (PCV) (01977 609000).The 13.2m coach has 59 Sege VIP passenger seats with leather inserts and piping, drop down tables, footrests and magazine nets. Entertainment is from a Bosch Professional Line system, and a toilet, fridge and drinks machine are all fitted.Sound proofing has been added around the engine bay, and an integrated coach wash including a water tank and pump facility is fitted. Power is from a 480bhp, 12.4-litre engine.last_img read more

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FORS launches new tyre management guide

first_imgFORS has released a tyre management guide to advise members on how best practice can help improve tyre wear, increase vehicle safety and reduce a vehicle’s environmental impact.The new guide is available to FORS members online.It highlights how robust tyre management policy can improve fleet safety as well as fuel efficiency.FORS Bronze membership stipulates that members must have a tyre management policy and supporting procedures in place to help ensure tyres are correctly managed.The guide includes a range of practical advice to help FORS members build their tyre management policy.Sonia Hayward, FORS Manager, says: “Correctly and accurately managed and maintained tyres make fleets safer and can lead to reduced emissions and real fuel savings for operators.“Over-inflated tyres present a safety issue, as tread contact with the road is decreased, which can affect braking distances and overall handling.“Conversely under-inflated tyres contribute towards increases in emissions of carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide, and for every 10% of decreased tyre pressure, fuel consumption increases by 2%.“This guide offers a wealth of information and with its handy policy and procedures checklists, it will help members meet FORS Bronze requirement ‘V7 Tyre management’.”last_img read more

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‘Higher’ – An EDM-Comedy Coming to HBO ft. Calvin Harris w/ Jay Z & Will Smith Producing

first_imgAccording to Deadline, HBO and DJ Calvin Harris are developing an EDM-comedy series entitled “Higher.” The show will focus on the wacky world of Electronic Dance Music, and, while it’s still in the early stages of production, one can only imagine the possibilities.So far, details are scarce, but particularly intriguing. The show will be produced by Jay-Z, Will Smith, and Jada Pinkett Smith. Will Smith and Jay-Z recently teamed up to produce the musical Annie, so this only furthers their  successful collaborative efforts.Higher will be written by Irvine Welsh, author of “Trainspotting,” a novel and subsequent cult classic film that highlights drug use in the UK. With Welsh’s tongue-in-cheek style, Harris’s familiarity with the EDM scene, and the brains of Smith and Jay-Z, “Higher” seems poised for success.We’ll be sure to post more details about “Higher” when they are announced, so stay tuned to L4LM!-David Melamed (@DMelamz)last_img read more

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TX Ambulance Transporting Toddler Who Nearly Drowned Involved in Crash

first_imgFile Photo Related The ambulance carrying him to the hospital somehow became involved in a crash with another vehicle. He was taken to the hospital in a different ambulance, where he was listed in critical condition. Efficacy of Statewide Workshops in Implementing Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator in EMS AgenciesPreparing for Pediatric EmergenciesTreating Pediatric Summertime Emergencies A toddler who nearly drowned was in an ambulance that was involvedin a crash on the way to the hospital.center_img Police continue to investigate. Watch the report below. Details on the circumstances surrounding the ambulance crashand the boy being found in the hot tub were not released. The 20-month-old was found floating face down in a hot tub on Monday in the city of Magnolia, about an hour north west of Houston, KTRK-TV reports. A deputy arrived first and performed life-saving measures on the boy until medical personnel showed up.last_img read more

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Coccia reflects on Rhodes Scholarship, Notre Dame years

first_imgBrian Lach I The Observer After a term defined by social inclusion initiatives, Coccia and Joyce were succeeded by Lauren Vidal and Matthew Devine as student body president and vice president last spring.Plans for the futureCoccia said his work at the Department of Health and Human Services has given him broad exposure to public policy and shown him firsthand how public social and economic policies are interwoven.“It’s easy to silo things, but it’s taught me that a holistic framework for government is what’s important in terms of addressing an agenda and what we owe to each other as human beings and citizens,” he said. “I’ve been working on projects that are within my interest areas and that expand my interests.”The comparative social policy program at Oxford appeals to him because “it’s a good balance between theory and the nuts and bolts of how to make policies work,” Coccia said.“Social inclusion as a policy framework is being discussed in the United Kingdom and France, and it’s a stated part of the comparative social policy curriculum [at Oxford],” he said. “I’ve been interested in the theoretical foundations for policy and policymaking, and from what I’ve read, the comparative degree does a great job showing the implications of how we approach public policy and how it gets shaped.”The past few years have given him a “much greater clarity” for his future plans, Coccia said, and he hopes to get involved in public policy at some level in the future. Looking at public policy from a social inclusion perspective is productive because “it’s a holistic and multidimensional account of the policy, and it takes into account all kinds of factors in terms of wellbeing and how policies influence each other,” he said.The leadership strategy he developed at Notre Dame will continue to be part of his future approach, he said. As student body president, he developed a reputation for scheduling nonstop personal meetings with hundreds of students, faculty members and administrators as he worked to develop initiatives.“I’ll still try to meet with as many people as possible,” he said with a laugh. “I will very much look forward to being a student again, but given my nature, I’ll be wanting to be involved in other ways as much as possible too.”Fellowships at Notre DameAt Notre Dame, students who apply for the Rhodes Scholarship or dozens of other national fellowships, including the Fulbright program and the Marshall/Mitchell scholarships, work with the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE).“Alex did what we hope all students will do as undergraduates at Notre Dame,” said Deb Rotman, director of CUSE. “He took his learning experience beyond the classroom and took full advantage of all the resources on campus to discern his path, cultivate his gifts and serve as a transformational leader.”Rotman said students interested in applying for the Rhodes Scholarship or any of the other national fellowships should visit fellows.nd.edu for preliminary information and contact CUSE for more details about the application process.Tags: Alex Coccia, Alumni, public policy, Rhodes, social inclusion, Student government MICHAEL YU | The Observer Nancy Joyce, Alex Coccia and Fr. Pete McCormick lead a prayer service Sept. 22, 2013, in response to a sexual assault report. Coccia, a 2014 graduate,  is one of  32 Rhodes Scholars from the U.S. this year and will begin studying at the University of Oxford in October 2015.Coccia is one of 32 Rhodes Scholars from the U.S. this year and will begin a two-year Masters in Comparative Social Policy program at the University of Oxford in October.Rhodes ScholarshipsAccording to the Rhodes Trust website, 80 scholars from across the world are selected annually according to criteria outlined by the will of Cecil Rhodes. The scholarship provides funding for students to enroll in a program of their choice at the University of Oxford in England.The website lists the four criteria from Rhodes’ will as: “literary and scholastic attainments; energy to use one’s talents to the full, as exemplified by fondness for and success in sports; truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship; moral force of character and instincts to lead, and to take an interest in one’s fellow beings.”“What I proposed for my program of study as a Rhodes Scholar was that I really wanted to engage in social and economic policy with a framework of social inclusion,” Coccia said. “I applied for Rhodes last year as well as this year, and both years have just felt like there was an immense team supporting me.“I had faculty mentors who took time out of their schedules to prep me or write recommendation letters and my fellow students who helped me articulate what I wanted to do with the scholarship, so it feels like it’s really been a team effort.”Formative time at Notre DameCoccia said his interest in social policy is “a natural trajectory” from his work at Notre Dame, which focused on inclusion in many forms.“My academic experience in Africana Studies and Peace Studies helped me begin to ask the right questions that I could apply to my work in the [Progressive Student Alliance] or in student government,” he said.Nancy Joyce, a 2014 graduate and student body vice president for 2013-14, said she witnessed firsthand how Coccia embodies the Rhodes criteria.“During the time that Alex and I worked together, it was always very clear to me that Alex was – and is – motivated by the stories and experiences of those without a voice, and is willing to take up the fight for those individuals and groups,” she said. “Whether working for the establishment of Notre Dame’s first [Gay-Straight Alliance], for the healing of those affected by sexual violence, for the welcoming of undocumented students at Notre Dame or for the support of socioeconomically disadvantaged students on our campus, Alex has always been a champion of those who need one.”Ernesto Verdeja, director of undergraduate studies for the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies said he was “delighted, but not surprised” by the news.“In his time here as a Peace Studies student at the Kroc Institute, he excelled in his studies and became a noted leader on campus,” Verdeja said. “He has distinguished himself as a scholar and a leader, and I wish him all the best at Oxford.”Joyce said watching both of Coccia’s Rhodes application processes makes her “genuinely thrilled and incredibly excited for him.”“Winning the Rhodes is such a well-deserved opportunity and will only serve to better enable Alex to continue championing the causes and people that most need his truth, courage, devotion, leadership and moral force of character,” she said. By the time he graduated in May 2014, Alex Coccia was one of the most recognizable people at Notre Dame.He earned two monograms with the varsity fencing team, which won the 2011 NCAA title when he was a freshman.He majored in Africana Studies and Peace Studies, conducted research in Rwanda, served as a three-year FIRE starter peer educator in the Gender Relations Center and founded the 4 to 5 Movement to educate and empower LGBTQ allies on campus.While serving as the 2013-14 student body president, he led the “One is Too Many” campaign against campus sexual assault, helped change admissions policies so undocumented students could attend Notre Dame and worked to improve the campus climate for LGBTQ students.He earned a Truman-Albright Fellowship and currently works in the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington D.C., addressing issues from climate change to domestic violence prevention.And, as of last weekend, he became Notre Dame’s 15th Rhodes Scholar, the first since 2002.“It’s a big honor, and I’m very thankful,” Coccia said. “I see it as a team effort, though, so I wish I could be celebrating with people on campus.”last_img read more

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EB18: Shiny (and colorful) new 12-speed chains from KMC, Connex & Taya

first_imgThe12-speed versions bring all of the hollow pin, four-corner ramped shaping and other features as their 11s chains. This Ti-Black Gold uses a highly corrosion resistant coating that they’ve proven in industrial settings, but it’s environmentally friendly to produce! Check them out at TayaChain.com.(Update: We originally mistakenly listed the above products as Connex, but they are from Taya and available now)Connex goes greenThe new CKS chain lube if biodegradable and comes with a thin dropper to make application easy and avoid overuse. When it comes time to wash it off, the formula won’t pollute the water supply, either. Now you just have to find an equally clean degreaser…Check them out at ConnexChain.com.2019 KMC 12-speed & eBike chainsKMC has also moved to a 12-speed design, which also gets their top-level “X” plate shaping for crisp, quiet shifts.It’ll come in the gold version shown up top and with DLC-coated inner links and pins in your choice of blue, red, green or yellow. Outer links remain black to keep the color hit subdued, but visible.We’re seeing more and more e-bike specific drivetrain products now that the market is becoming so big and brands are seeing the downsides of using people-powered parts for bikes with motor assistance. KMC is solving the problem by making their first sprockets, available for front and rear, along with a chain specifically for them.What’s unique about them is the width…they use a wider tooth profile and chain, along with much larger diameter pins and rollers, to handle the increased torque. Check them out at KMCchain.com. Taya was showing off colorful new coatings for their 11-speed chains, which adds a bit of variety to the nickel-coated outer links, leaving the stainless steel inner links to contrast the color. Shown above and directly below, the blue Galaxy finish is the top level of their DHT (Diamond Hard Tech) chains that promise extended durability and quiet performance. And, now, 12-speed SRAM Eagle compatibility!last_img read more

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Slave Play Tony Nominee James Cusati-Moyer Tapped for Shonda Rhimes Series

first_img James Cusati-Moyer, who was Tony-nominated for his performance in Jeremy O. Harris’ Slave Play, has landed a recurring role on Shonda Rhimes’ Netflix series Inventing Anna. According to The Wrap, the 10-episode series adapts the New York Magazine article by Jessica Pressler about Anna Sorokin, a.k.a. Anna Delvey, the 28-year-old who faked being a German heiress to swindle New York elite out of more than $200,000. Cusati-Moyer will play Val, a stylist and fashion director who experiences the whiplash of a whirlwind friendship with Anna.David Frankel will direct the cast, which also includes Julia Garner in the title role, Anna Chlumsky, Laverne Cox, Katie Lowes and Alexis Floyd. A production schedule will be announced later.In addition to Slave Play (which he also appeared in off-Broadway), Cusati-Moyer has been seen on Broadway in the Trip Cullman-helmed revival of Six Degrees of Separation. Off-Broadway, he has appeared in Terrence McNally’s Fire and Air and The Devil in The Soldier’s Tale. His screen credits include False Positive, Prodigal Son, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, The Path, Red Oaks, Blue Bloods and Time After Time. View Comments Star Files James Cusati-Moyer(Photo: Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com) James Cusati-Moyerlast_img read more

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Segmentation sparks growth and member loyalty

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Data analysis tailors marketing messages to the most receptive members.Data analytics is a long-term strategy, according to a white paper from The Members Group (TMG), Des Moines, Iowa.Analysis aids segmentation, which has quickly become the magic word in credit card marketing.The goal is to get the right offer to the right cardholder at the right time, in a manner that’s most profitable for the portfolio and creates long-term loyalty among cardholders.Data analytics isn’t reinventing the wheel, but rather reshaping it among credit unions such as $1.7 billion asset Spokane (Wash.) Teachers Credit Union (STCU).Russell Palmer, STCU’s card services manager, became a proponent of business intelligence while working at a national bank. But he entered his new position without an instinct for card management, which made him keener to understand the credit union’s portfolio.“Data analytics was my answer to getting up to speed quickly, and it has worked extremely well,” Palmer says. “We’ve learned more about our cardholders and our portfolio than we’ve ever known.” continue reading »last_img read more